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Benefit Impact Analysis
– Complex Systems Approach
(or: ‘How I Learned To Stop Worrying
And Love All This Big Scary
Digita...
Hi.
(Yeah, nowadays
I do look a bit older...)
I’m Tom.
These days
I’d describe myself as
a maker of tools for change
– all sorts of tools...
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0).
To view ...
…and this…
…and this…
Sales-
pitch!
https://leanpub.com/tb-changes/
New
book!
Anyway, on with the show...
It’s all about
the money!
...and if we think it is,
that’s when we get into trouble...
Actually, no, it isn’t...
‘Economy’ literally means
‘management of the household’...
...and yes, managing the money
is important in a household,
and...
...but maybe not so hard as the rest?
So in business,
why do we obsess so much
about the money
and yet so much (much) less
about everything else?
Hmm…
CC-BY-ND-SA ores2k via Flickr
…gonna hafta think about this one…
CC-BY-ND alexsemenzato via Flickr
How should we
track the money
across the organisation?
Perhaps split everything
into profit-centres
and cost-centres?
Where IT is viewed
only as a ‘cost-centre’,
it’s often subject to
ruthless cost-cutting…
...which leads to headlines like this:
Do government
and non-profits
only have cost-centres?
Is that why the endless
cost-cutting?
“The only
profit-centre
is a customer
whose cheque
hasn’t bounced”
Distinctions between profit-centre
and cost-centre are ...
A useful suggestion:
Every enterprise
is ‘for-profit’.
(We need to think of ‘profit’ in a much
broader sense than money al...
Hmm…
CC-BY-ND-SA ores2k via Flickr
…gonna hafta think about this one…
CC-BY-ND alexsemenzato via Flickr
Shave a few corners
here and there...
...what could possibly go wrong!
(...again and again and again and again...)
Is your industry
playing a game
of pass-the-
grenade?
Understanding kurtosis-risk...
‘United Breaks Guitars’
Dave Carroll: ‘United Breaks Guitars’ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YGc4zOqozo
‘United Breaks People’?
‘Video shows passenger forcibly dragged off United Airlines plane’ https://youtu.be/VrDWY6C1178
(it’s actually a Photoshopped parody, by Nick Nicotera)...
“Bad timing on your update, @united!”
(though the real one isn’t much better, if you think about it...)
“Bad timing on your update, @united!”
and then you get the memes...
Hmm…
CC-BY-ND-SA ores2k via Flickr
…defnatly hafta think about that…
CC-BY-ND alexsemenzato via Flickr
In short:
We really need a rethink
about money, cost and business
We also need
to think differently
about opportunity and risk
Digital-transformation is…
risk
opportunity
risk
opportunity
Opportunity always includes risk, risk always includes opport...
Digital transformation
is far more political
than digital
– Ian Alexander
Digital transformation:
“It’s not not about the technology”
...but it’s also mostly not about
the technology.
See post ‘Di...
Everyone wants to sell us
ready-made answers...
...yet the real challenge is in
finding the right questions
...“solutions!”
Finding the right questions
can be even more important
than finding the right answers
(in part because questions
tend to s...
Scope and
stakeholders
A business is a construct, an association of
human beings combining capital and labor
to make something.
That business has...
“An organisation is bounded by
rules, roles and responsibilities;
an enterprise is bounded by
vision, values and commitmen...
Perspectives across the boundary
We need to understand each of these perspectives
See post ‘Digital-transformation – it’s ...
Outside-in…
CC-BY Fretro via Flickr
“Customers
do not appear
in our processes,
we appear in
their experiences.”
Chris Pott...
‘User experience’
is more than the behavior
of your product or service;
it covers all interactions
your customers have
wit...
If the organisation says it ‘is’ the enterprise,
there’s no shared-story - and often, no story at all.
Whose story?
The minimum real enterprise is the supply-chain
- a story of shared interactions and transactions.
Whose story?
The organisation and enterprise of the supply-chain take
place within a broader organisation of the market.
Whose story?
The market itself exists within a context of ‘intangible’
interactions with the broader shared-enterprise story.
Whose sto...
Enterprise is…
Every point in the architecture includes every other point
...fractal!
The story is not solely at the whole-of-business level
- we can generalise it to any type or level of context
Whose story?
Stories within stories…
enacted in any way we need…
Every service has its own myriad of stakeholders
Whose story?
A stakeholder
is anyone
who can wield
a sharp-pointed
stake
in our direction…
CC-BY-NC-SA evilpeacock via Flickr
Who are t...
And, to use a certain
four-letter word…
GDPR!
Boundary of identity vs control
Outsourcing does not outsource responsibility!
See post ‘Boundary of identity, boundary of...
The boundary-of-control
delimits what the managers
think the organisation is…
the boundary-of-identity
delimits what every...
...we need a whole-context model like this.
To make sense of GDPR...
Enterprise
and business-model
Enterprise as
“the animal-spirits of
the entrepreneur”
CC-BY-ND archaeon via Flickr
‘Business-model mechanics’
Strategyzer: ‘Why Some Business Models Are Better Than Others’
http://blog.strategyzer.com/post...
(includes Value Proposition Canvas to link organisation and customer)
Business Model Canvas
supplier stuff stuff we do cus...
Four dimensions described for Business Model Canvas
Business-model context
...it provides overview of business-model as a whole
BMCanvas is whole-org only...
Example implementation-detail shown – needs to be fractal
...we need to flesh out the detail!
“Real-world detail can break
the best-looking business-model
without even breaking out a sweat.
“We need to have a better ...
Market rules and interactions impact on customer-relations
Need to expand out to market...
...out to entire shared-enterprise
Model all aspects of context
Don’t try to ‘boil the ocean’!
Always aim for ‘Just Enough Detail’
And remember, it’s fractal…
…fractality provides simplicity, protection against overload
CC-BY-NC-SA gjshepherd via Flickr
Enterprise
as a system
...or, to be more pedantic,
system-of-systems interacting and intersecting
with other systems-as-sy...
Start with an assertion:
Everything in the enterprise
is or represents a service.
(If so, we can describe everything
in th...
A tension exists between what is, and what we want.
The vision describes the desired-ends for action;
values guide action,...
A service represents a means toward an end
– ultimately, the desired-ends of the enterprise-vision.
The nature of service
Services serve.
(That’s why they’re called ‘services’…)
What they serve is the story,
via exchange of value.
(And if we ge...
Services exchange value with each other, to help each
service reach toward their respective vision and outcome.
Relations ...
Value-flow is ‘horizontal’, but connection is first made by
‘vertical’ connection to shared-value and value-proposition
Ho...
Each service sits at an intersection of values (vertical)
and exchanges of value (horizontal)
Values and value
Each service sits at an intersection of values (vertical)
and exchanges of value (horizontal)
Values and value-flow
Services link together in chains or webs, as structured
and/or unstructured processes, to deliver more complex and
versati...
Many different forms of
value, investment, benefit
– where the meaning of ‘value’
arises from the enterprise-story
Dimensions of value
Most real-world entities encapsulate composites of dimensions
No distinct dimension for money?
No need: money is a composite of
‘conceptual + aspirational’
– an arbitrary number
associ...
Always remember
the human elements:
skills, knowledge, commitment
and much much more...
Enterprise Canvas visual-checklist (aka ‘the robot-chicken’?)
Value, structure, system, story
Keeping on-track: value-proposition
See post ‘What is a value-proposition?’
http://weblog.tetradian.com/what-is-a-value-pr...
Value-proposition is not
“the fancy name
for your product or service”
– it’s how you
propose to deliver value
to the entir...
Keeping on-track: value-balance
See post ‘Services and Enterprise Canvas review – 3D: Investors’
http://weblog.tetradian.c...
We need to consider
investments and returns
of every applicable type,
to and from
every type of stakeholder.
(‘Applicable ...
Keeping on-track: validation
See post ‘Services and Enterprise Canvas review – 3C: Validation’
http://weblog.tetradian.com...
Validation-services:
for each enterprise-value:
- build awareness of the value
- build capability to enact support
- enact...
How does value flow across
the shared-enterprise?
What drives value-transitions
and value-transforms?
How does each intera...
The service-cycle
(transactions depend on (reaffirmed) reputation and trust)
Identify the elements that help to pull from one phase to the next
Five Elements and service-cycle
Performance
Purpose
Peo...
Service-cycle and story-cycle
(Start here)
Every instance of service is also a project in its own right
Project-cycle and service-cycle
Performance
(adjourning)
repo...
Similar exchanges apply across every interchange and flow
Exchanges everywhere…
The service-cycle applies across all of these connections
Enterprise and service-cycles
shared-enterprise
market
procureme...
BUT…
if we try to take short-cuts,
the cycles will break down…
(short-cuts give seemingly-better results in short-term,
gu...
“Quick-money’ service-cycle
(transactions eventually fail from loss of reputation and trust)
‘Quick-money’ failure-cycle
(incomplete short-cut
after transaction-profit
slowly erodes trust / respect,
breaks continuit...
Service Canvas model, inverted
(“Our strategy is last plus 10%” - breaks integration with enterprise)
Enterprise
and money
Yes, we need to get it right
on managing the money
– yet also on managing
all other forms of value as well
“The NHS, though it needs to
run efficiently, is not a business.
“It is about diagnosing, treating and
caring for patients...
“The NHS, though it needs to
run efficiently, is not a business”
...neither are most businesses!
See post ‘The Demoralised...
value-flow
(‘how’,
‘with-what’)
value-flow
(‘how’,
‘with-what’)
These are distinct flows – don’t mix them up!
values
(‘why...
Values-first enables full connection with shared-enterprise
Doing it right: values-first…
Money-first causes disconnect from shared-enterprise
Doing it wrong: money-first…
The core metric
of all business is
trust
Trust that we will keep our promises
Trust that we will keep on-track to our valu...
Making money
is a side-effect of
staying on-track to values
Simple.
(though rarely easy...)
Saving money
is a side-effect ...
If we focus too much on money,
we lose track of value.
If we focus on the ‘how’ of value,
we lose track of the ‘why’ of va...
Whenever we explore
questions about money
always start from the values
– not the money!
Thank you!
Contact: Tom Graves
Company: Tetradian Consulting
Email: tom@tetradian.com
Twitter: @tetradian ( http://twitter.com/tetrad...
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ICS/IASA Conference 'How I learned to stop worrying...'

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Slidedeck for IASA / Irish Computer Society IT-architecture conference 'Show me the money!'

(Don't worry too much about the title - the talk is actually about the relation between money and value, and why value, values and trust are actually the core concerns for any enterprise-architecture.)

Published in: Business
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ICS/IASA Conference 'How I learned to stop worrying...'

  1. 1. Benefit Impact Analysis – Complex Systems Approach (or: ‘How I Learned To Stop Worrying And Love All This Big Scary Digital-Transformation Stuff’) Tom Graves, Tetradian Consulting IASA, Dublin, June 2017
  2. 2. Hi. (Yeah, nowadays I do look a bit older...) I’m Tom.
  3. 3. These days I’d describe myself as a maker of tools for change – all sorts of tools...
  4. 4. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0). To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ Tetradian www.tetradian.com Project By Date VersionHolomap shared-enterprise / indirect-context includes community, government, non-clients, anticlients, others includes investors, beneficiaries market / direct-context includes competitors, regulators, recruiters, trainers, journals, others transactional-context includes suppliers / providers, customers / consumers, transactional partners prospect prospectsupplier / provider partner client / consumer partner organisation service-in-focus …such as this…
  5. 5. …and this…
  6. 6. …and this…
  7. 7. Sales- pitch! https://leanpub.com/tb-changes/ New book!
  8. 8. Anyway, on with the show...
  9. 9. It’s all about the money! ...and if we think it is, that’s when we get into trouble... Actually, no, it isn’t...
  10. 10. ‘Economy’ literally means ‘management of the household’... ...and yes, managing the money is important in a household, and yes, it’s often hard...
  11. 11. ...but maybe not so hard as the rest?
  12. 12. So in business, why do we obsess so much about the money and yet so much (much) less about everything else?
  13. 13. Hmm… CC-BY-ND-SA ores2k via Flickr
  14. 14. …gonna hafta think about this one… CC-BY-ND alexsemenzato via Flickr
  15. 15. How should we track the money across the organisation? Perhaps split everything into profit-centres and cost-centres?
  16. 16. Where IT is viewed only as a ‘cost-centre’, it’s often subject to ruthless cost-cutting…
  17. 17. ...which leads to headlines like this:
  18. 18. Do government and non-profits only have cost-centres? Is that why the endless cost-cutting?
  19. 19. “The only profit-centre is a customer whose cheque hasn’t bounced” Distinctions between profit-centre and cost-centre are misleading...
  20. 20. A useful suggestion: Every enterprise is ‘for-profit’. (We need to think of ‘profit’ in a much broader sense than money alone.)
  21. 21. Hmm… CC-BY-ND-SA ores2k via Flickr
  22. 22. …gonna hafta think about this one… CC-BY-ND alexsemenzato via Flickr
  23. 23. Shave a few corners here and there... ...what could possibly go wrong! (...again and again and again and again...)
  24. 24. Is your industry playing a game of pass-the- grenade? Understanding kurtosis-risk...
  25. 25. ‘United Breaks Guitars’ Dave Carroll: ‘United Breaks Guitars’ http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5YGc4zOqozo
  26. 26. ‘United Breaks People’? ‘Video shows passenger forcibly dragged off United Airlines plane’ https://youtu.be/VrDWY6C1178
  27. 27. (it’s actually a Photoshopped parody, by Nick Nicotera)... “Bad timing on your update, @united!”
  28. 28. (though the real one isn’t much better, if you think about it...) “Bad timing on your update, @united!”
  29. 29. and then you get the memes...
  30. 30. Hmm… CC-BY-ND-SA ores2k via Flickr
  31. 31. …defnatly hafta think about that… CC-BY-ND alexsemenzato via Flickr
  32. 32. In short: We really need a rethink about money, cost and business
  33. 33. We also need to think differently about opportunity and risk
  34. 34. Digital-transformation is… risk opportunity risk opportunity Opportunity always includes risk, risk always includes opportunity
  35. 35. Digital transformation is far more political than digital – Ian Alexander
  36. 36. Digital transformation: “It’s not not about the technology” ...but it’s also mostly not about the technology. See post ‘Digital-transformation – it’s about (much) more than just digital’: http://weblog.tetradian.com/digital-transformation-its-about-much-more-than-just-digital/ – Andrew McAfee
  37. 37. Everyone wants to sell us ready-made answers... ...yet the real challenge is in finding the right questions ...“solutions!”
  38. 38. Finding the right questions can be even more important than finding the right answers (in part because questions tend to stay the same, whereas answers will change with time and context)
  39. 39. Scope and stakeholders
  40. 40. A business is a construct, an association of human beings combining capital and labor to make something. That business has precisely the same social responsibilities as the people it consists of. The responsibility to play fairly ... and to create value for all those it engages with. – Seth Godin Seth Godin: ‘Off the hook with Milton Friedman’ http://sethgodin.typepad.com/seths_blog/2017/06/off-the-hook-with-milton-friedman.html
  41. 41. “An organisation is bounded by rules, roles and responsibilities; an enterprise is bounded by vision, values and commitments.” “An organisation is bounded by rules, roles and responsibilities; an enterprise is bounded by vision, values and commitments.” Tom Graves, Mapping the Enterprise, Tetradian, 2010 Enterprise as story Organisation aligns with structure, enterprise with story. We need a balance of both for the architecture to work.
  42. 42. Perspectives across the boundary We need to understand each of these perspectives See post ‘Digital-transformation – it’s about (much) more than just digital’: http://weblog.tetradian.com/digital-transformation-its-about-much-more-than-just-digital/
  43. 43. Outside-in… CC-BY Fretro via Flickr “Customers do not appear in our processes, we appear in their experiences.” Chris Potts, recrEAtion, Technics, 2010
  44. 44. ‘User experience’ is more than the behavior of your product or service; it covers all interactions your customers have with your company. – Bard Papegaaij See post ‘The whole experience’ http://weblog.tetradian.com/the-whole-experience/
  45. 45. If the organisation says it ‘is’ the enterprise, there’s no shared-story - and often, no story at all. Whose story?
  46. 46. The minimum real enterprise is the supply-chain - a story of shared interactions and transactions. Whose story?
  47. 47. The organisation and enterprise of the supply-chain take place within a broader organisation of the market. Whose story?
  48. 48. The market itself exists within a context of ‘intangible’ interactions with the broader shared-enterprise story. Whose story?
  49. 49. Enterprise is… Every point in the architecture includes every other point ...fractal!
  50. 50. The story is not solely at the whole-of-business level - we can generalise it to any type or level of context Whose story?
  51. 51. Stories within stories…
  52. 52. enacted in any way we need…
  53. 53. Every service has its own myriad of stakeholders Whose story?
  54. 54. A stakeholder is anyone who can wield a sharp-pointed stake in our direction… CC-BY-NC-SA evilpeacock via Flickr Who are the stakeholders? (Hint: there are a lot more of them than we might at first think…)
  55. 55. And, to use a certain four-letter word… GDPR!
  56. 56. Boundary of identity vs control Outsourcing does not outsource responsibility! See post ‘Boundary of identity, boundary of control’: http://weblog.tetradian.com/boundary-of-identity-vs-control/
  57. 57. The boundary-of-control delimits what the managers think the organisation is… the boundary-of-identity delimits what everyone else thinks the organisation is. See post ‘More on boundary of identity versus control’: http://weblog.tetradian.com/more-on-identity-versus-control/ Outsourcing does not outsource responsibility!
  58. 58. ...we need a whole-context model like this. To make sense of GDPR...
  59. 59. Enterprise and business-model
  60. 60. Enterprise as “the animal-spirits of the entrepreneur” CC-BY-ND archaeon via Flickr
  61. 61. ‘Business-model mechanics’ Strategyzer: ‘Why Some Business Models Are Better Than Others’ http://blog.strategyzer.com/posts/2015/4/7/why-are-some-business-models-better-than-others
  62. 62. (includes Value Proposition Canvas to link organisation and customer) Business Model Canvas supplier stuff stuff we do customer stuff money stuff Strategyzer: https://strategyzer.com/canvas/business-model-canvas
  63. 63. Four dimensions described for Business Model Canvas Business-model context
  64. 64. ...it provides overview of business-model as a whole BMCanvas is whole-org only...
  65. 65. Example implementation-detail shown – needs to be fractal ...we need to flesh out the detail!
  66. 66. “Real-world detail can break the best-looking business-model without even breaking out a sweat. “We need to have a better sense of that detail before committing ourselves to a lot of hard work and ultimate heartache.” See post ‘Hidden risks in business-model design’ http://weblog.tetradian.com/hidden-risks-in-business-model-design/
  67. 67. Market rules and interactions impact on customer-relations Need to expand out to market...
  68. 68. ...out to entire shared-enterprise
  69. 69. Model all aspects of context
  70. 70. Don’t try to ‘boil the ocean’! Always aim for ‘Just Enough Detail’
  71. 71. And remember, it’s fractal… …fractality provides simplicity, protection against overload CC-BY-NC-SA gjshepherd via Flickr
  72. 72. Enterprise as a system ...or, to be more pedantic, system-of-systems interacting and intersecting with other systems-as-systems-of-systems, but we won’t worry about that just yet...
  73. 73. Start with an assertion: Everything in the enterprise is or represents a service. (If so, we can describe everything in the same consistent way.)
  74. 74. A tension exists between what is, and what we want. The vision describes the desired-ends for action; values guide action, describing how success would feel. Why anything happens
  75. 75. A service represents a means toward an end – ultimately, the desired-ends of the enterprise-vision. The nature of service
  76. 76. Services serve. (That’s why they’re called ‘services’…) What they serve is the story, via exchange of value. (And if we get that right, they can sometimes make money, too.)
  77. 77. Services exchange value with each other, to help each service reach toward their respective vision and outcome. Relations between services
  78. 78. Value-flow is ‘horizontal’, but connection is first made by ‘vertical’ connection to shared-value and value-proposition How connection happens
  79. 79. Each service sits at an intersection of values (vertical) and exchanges of value (horizontal) Values and value
  80. 80. Each service sits at an intersection of values (vertical) and exchanges of value (horizontal) Values and value-flow
  81. 81. Services link together in chains or webs, as structured and/or unstructured processes, to deliver more complex and versatile composite-services. Supply-chain or value-web
  82. 82. Many different forms of value, investment, benefit – where the meaning of ‘value’ arises from the enterprise-story
  83. 83. Dimensions of value Most real-world entities encapsulate composites of dimensions
  84. 84. No distinct dimension for money? No need: money is a composite of ‘conceptual + aspirational’ – an arbitrary number associated with a brand (Money-as-cash is ‘physical + conceptual + aspirational’ – but that’s another whole story...)
  85. 85. Always remember the human elements: skills, knowledge, commitment and much much more...
  86. 86. Enterprise Canvas visual-checklist (aka ‘the robot-chicken’?) Value, structure, system, story
  87. 87. Keeping on-track: value-proposition See post ‘What is a value-proposition?’ http://weblog.tetradian.com/what-is-a-value-proposition/
  88. 88. Value-proposition is not “the fancy name for your product or service” – it’s how you propose to deliver value to the entire shared-enterprise. (Value-proposition provides the link between why, how and with-what.)
  89. 89. Keeping on-track: value-balance See post ‘Services and Enterprise Canvas review – 3D: Investors’ http://weblog.tetradian.com/services-and-ecanvas-3d-investors/
  90. 90. We need to consider investments and returns of every applicable type, to and from every type of stakeholder. (‘Applicable type’ is determined by the shared-enterprise values.)
  91. 91. Keeping on-track: validation See post ‘Services and Enterprise Canvas review – 3C: Validation’ http://weblog.tetradian.com/services-and-ecanvas-review-3c-validation/
  92. 92. Validation-services: for each enterprise-value: - build awareness of the value - build capability to enact support - enact in practice at run-time - assess and review (for continual improvement)
  93. 93. How does value flow across the shared-enterprise? What drives value-transitions and value-transforms? How does each interaction help to build and maintain trust?
  94. 94. The service-cycle (transactions depend on (reaffirmed) reputation and trust)
  95. 95. Identify the elements that help to pull from one phase to the next Five Elements and service-cycle Performance Purpose People Preparation Process PoliciesValues Events Completions Success (start here) Trust / Commitment (Initiating-Events) (Completion-Events)
  96. 96. Service-cycle and story-cycle (Start here)
  97. 97. Every instance of service is also a project in its own right Project-cycle and service-cycle Performance (adjourning) reporting etc Purpose (forming) strategy etc People (storming) HR etc Preparation (norming) scheduling etc Process (performing) production etc
  98. 98. Similar exchanges apply across every interchange and flow Exchanges everywhere…
  99. 99. The service-cycle applies across all of these connections Enterprise and service-cycles shared-enterprise market procurement product- development + marketing receive materials to inventory make shoes store and ready shoes for shipment sales and service accounts payable manage budget, operations accounts receivable identify and support suppliers obtain materials pay for materials identify and support customers deliver shoes be paid for shoes supplier customer gain supplier respect gain customer respect verify supplier satisfaction verify customer satisfaction gain / maintain market respect gain / maintain enterprise reputation verify market satisfaction verify enterprise satisfaction
  100. 100. BUT… if we try to take short-cuts, the cycles will break down… (short-cuts give seemingly-better results in short-term, guaranteed-failure in the longer-term…)
  101. 101. “Quick-money’ service-cycle (transactions eventually fail from loss of reputation and trust)
  102. 102. ‘Quick-money’ failure-cycle (incomplete short-cut after transaction-profit slowly erodes trust / respect, breaks continuity of service-cycle)
  103. 103. Service Canvas model, inverted (“Our strategy is last plus 10%” - breaks integration with enterprise)
  104. 104. Enterprise and money
  105. 105. Yes, we need to get it right on managing the money – yet also on managing all other forms of value as well
  106. 106. “The NHS, though it needs to run efficiently, is not a business. “It is about diagnosing, treating and caring for patients in the best way. See post ‘The Demoralised Man’ http://weblog.tetradian.com/the-demoralised-man/ “All its other functions should be subservient to that.” – Heather Wood
  107. 107. “The NHS, though it needs to run efficiently, is not a business” ...neither are most businesses! See post ‘The Demoralised Man’ http://weblog.tetradian.com/the-demoralised-man/ Always start from the values, not the money
  108. 108. value-flow (‘how’, ‘with-what’) value-flow (‘how’, ‘with-what’) These are distinct flows – don’t mix them up! values (‘why’) values (‘why’) profit (money and more) profit (money and more) Values, value-flow, money
  109. 109. Values-first enables full connection with shared-enterprise Doing it right: values-first…
  110. 110. Money-first causes disconnect from shared-enterprise Doing it wrong: money-first…
  111. 111. The core metric of all business is trust Trust that we will keep our promises Trust that we will keep on-track to our values
  112. 112. Making money is a side-effect of staying on-track to values Simple. (though rarely easy...) Saving money is a side-effect of being effective on-purpose
  113. 113. If we focus too much on money, we lose track of value. If we focus on the ‘how’ of value, we lose track of the ‘why’ of values. Always start from the values. (Not the money.)
  114. 114. Whenever we explore questions about money always start from the values – not the money!
  115. 115. Thank you!
  116. 116. Contact: Tom Graves Company: Tetradian Consulting Email: tom@tetradian.com Twitter: @tetradian ( http://twitter.com/tetradian ) Weblog: http://weblog.tetradian.com Slidedecks: http://www.slideshare.net/tetradian Publications: http://tetradianbooks.com and http://leanpub.com/u/tetradian Books: • The enterprise as story: the role of narrative in enterprise- architecture (2012) • Mapping the enterprise: modelling the enterprise as services with the Enterprise Canvas (2010) • Everyday enterprise-architecture: sensemaking, strategy, structures and solutions (2010) • Doing enterprise-architecture: process and practice in the real enterprise (2009) Further information:

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