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How to build continuous-learning
into architecture practice
Tom Graves, Tetradian Consulting
BCS EASG Conference, London, ...
Hi.
(Yeah, nowadays
I do look a bit older...)
I’m Tom.
These days
I’d describe myself as
a maker of tools for change
(more on that in a moment...)
Sales-
pitch!
https://leanpub.com/tb-changes/
New
book!
Anyway, that’s enough intro
– let’s get on with the show...
If architecture
is a skill...
...how do we get better
at doing that skill?
A two-part answer:
...linked with
continuous review / learning
Practice, practice, practice!
Perhaps I can’t help much
on the fine-details of practice...
...but I can help
with the continuous learning
The architecture-cycle
(Start here)
The architecture-cycle
architecture is
always centred
on people
there is sequence
to the work
(though with some
back-and-f...
…closes the loop
from Performance back to Purpose
and onward to the next iteration
Continuous learning…
Architecture-cycle: Performance
linking
Performance
back to Purpose
Performance
…is on benefits-realised
and lessons-learned.
Focus for Performance phase…
We can do this via a practice based on
US Army ...
After-Action Review: precursors
How?
(plan,
preparation)
What?
(actions,
action-
records)
Outcomes
(benefits-
realised, le...
After-Action Review: sequence
1: What was
supposed to
happen?
2: What
actually
happened?
3: What was
the source of
the dif...
2: “Pin your stripes at the door”
– everyone had their own part to play,
everyone has equal ‘response-ability’
Three rules...
AAR 1: review initial plan
1: What
was
supposed
to happen?
Performance
“What was supposed to happen?”
Step 1…
Derive this from the Preparation stage
of the cycle
(should be ~10% of allotted tim...
AAR 2: review real-world action
1: What
was
supposed
to happen?
2: What
actually
happened?
Performance
“What actually happened?”
Step 2…
Derive this from the Process stage
of the cycle
(should be ~10% of allotted review-time)
AAR 3: assess variances
1: What
was
supposed
to happen?
2: What
actually
happened?
3: What was
the source of
the differenc...
“What caused the differences?”
Step 3…
Discuss the differences between plan
and actual outcomes – look for what
worked une...
AAR 4: personal change
1: What
was
supposed
to happen?
2: What
actually
happened?
3: What was
the source of
the difference...
“What can I do differently?”
Step 4…
Discuss options to improve individuals’
skills, knowledge, experience and
engagement ...
AAR 5: collective change
1: What
was
supposed
to happen?
2: What
actually
happened?
3: What was
the source of
the differen...
“What can we do differently?”
Step 5…
Discuss options to improve working
together as a team or collective – and
commitment...
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0).
To view ...
This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0).
To view ...
Practice: After Action Review
Do an After Action Review on anything:
• What was supposed (expected) to happen?
• What actu...
What have you learnt
from this?
...what will you do differently
for continuous-learning
in your architecture-work?
Thank you!
Contact: Tom Graves
Company: Tetradian Consulting
Email: tom@tetradian.com
Twitter: @tetradian ( http://twitter.com/tetrad...
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How to build continuous-learning into architecture-practice

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Presentation/workshop for British Computer Society (BCS) Enterprise-Architecture Special-Interest Group conference, London, 17 July 2017.

A simple step-by-step process to build a habit of reviewing benefits-realisation and lessons-learned from each iteration of architecture, with further actions to develop individual skills and shared-skills for teams. As shown in the workshop part of the session, the process can take as little as ten minutes, to deliver real, usable insights on a team's architecture-practice.

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How to build continuous-learning into architecture-practice

  1. 1. How to build continuous-learning into architecture practice Tom Graves, Tetradian Consulting BCS EASG Conference, London, 2017
  2. 2. Hi. (Yeah, nowadays I do look a bit older...) I’m Tom.
  3. 3. These days I’d describe myself as a maker of tools for change (more on that in a moment...)
  4. 4. Sales- pitch! https://leanpub.com/tb-changes/ New book!
  5. 5. Anyway, that’s enough intro – let’s get on with the show...
  6. 6. If architecture is a skill... ...how do we get better at doing that skill?
  7. 7. A two-part answer: ...linked with continuous review / learning Practice, practice, practice!
  8. 8. Perhaps I can’t help much on the fine-details of practice... ...but I can help with the continuous learning
  9. 9. The architecture-cycle (Start here)
  10. 10. The architecture-cycle architecture is always centred on people there is sequence to the work (though with some back-and-forth) each iteration begins with its own business-question cycles may be nested within other cycles, recursively, fractally
  11. 11. …closes the loop from Performance back to Purpose and onward to the next iteration Continuous learning…
  12. 12. Architecture-cycle: Performance linking Performance back to Purpose Performance
  13. 13. …is on benefits-realised and lessons-learned. Focus for Performance phase… We can do this via a practice based on US Army After Action Review… https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/After-action_review
  14. 14. After-Action Review: precursors How? (plan, preparation) What? (actions, action- records) Outcomes (benefits- realised, lessons- learned) Why? (aims, criteria for success) Who? (team, stakeholders) Performance
  15. 15. After-Action Review: sequence 1: What was supposed to happen? 2: What actually happened? 3: What was the source of the difference? 4: What can I learn to do differently? 5: What can we learn to do differently? Performance
  16. 16. 2: “Pin your stripes at the door” – everyone had their own part to play, everyone has equal ‘response-ability’ Three rules… 1: “Aim to learn how to do it better” – we can always do it better… 3: “No blame!” – blame only gets in the way - it blocks us from learning how to do it better
  17. 17. AAR 1: review initial plan 1: What was supposed to happen? Performance
  18. 18. “What was supposed to happen?” Step 1… Derive this from the Preparation stage of the cycle (should be ~10% of allotted time for review)
  19. 19. AAR 2: review real-world action 1: What was supposed to happen? 2: What actually happened? Performance
  20. 20. “What actually happened?” Step 2… Derive this from the Process stage of the cycle (should be ~10% of allotted review-time)
  21. 21. AAR 3: assess variances 1: What was supposed to happen? 2: What actually happened? 3: What was the source of the difference? Performance
  22. 22. “What caused the differences?” Step 3… Discuss the differences between plan and actual outcomes – look for what worked unexpectedly-well as much as for what ‘went wrong’ (should be ~20% of allotted review-time)
  23. 23. AAR 4: personal change 1: What was supposed to happen? 2: What actually happened? 3: What was the source of the difference? 4: What can I learn to do differently? Performance
  24. 24. “What can I do differently?” Step 4… Discuss options to improve individuals’ skills, knowledge, experience and engagement in shared-purpose – and commitments to changes that would be needed to implement those options (should be ~20-30% of allotted review-time)
  25. 25. AAR 5: collective change 1: What was supposed to happen? 2: What actually happened? 3: What was the source of the difference? 4: What can I learn to do differently? 5: What can we learn to do differently? Performance
  26. 26. “What can we do differently?” Step 5… Discuss options to improve working together as a team or collective – and commitments to changes that would be needed to implement those options (should be ~20-30% of allotted review-time)
  27. 27. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0). To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ Tetradian www.tetradian.com Project By Date Version 5E-Outcomes (Performance) Core question and criteria for success what is the core-question for this iteration? how will we know when we succeed? [from 5E-Why worksheet] Difference what were the sources of difference between Intent and Action? [from 5E-AAR worksheet} Action what actually happened? [from 5E-What worksheet] Intent what was supposed to happen? [from 5E-How worksheet] Actors and stakeholders who are the key players for this iteration in this context? [from 5E-Who worksheet] Learnings and action - personal what did we each learn from this? what could we each do differently next time? [from 5E-AAR worksheet} Learnings and action - group what did we learn from this, as a group? what could we do differently as a group? [from 5E-AAR worksheet}
  28. 28. This work is licensed under the Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike 4.0 International License (CC BY-SA 4.0). To view a copy of this license, visit https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0/ Tetradian www.tetradian.com Project By Date Version what caused the difference? (Performance) what can I change to do it better next time? (Purpose) what can we change to do it better next time? (People) what was supposed to happen? (Preparation) what actually happened? (Process) 5E-AAR (After Action Review) (Start here)
  29. 29. Practice: After Action Review Do an After Action Review on anything: • What was supposed (expected) to happen? • What actually happened? • What were sources or causes of difference? • For each of us, what can I learn from this, to do differently next time? • What can we learn from this, as a group, to do differently next time? …put those commitments into practice!
  30. 30. What have you learnt from this? ...what will you do differently for continuous-learning in your architecture-work?
  31. 31. Thank you!
  32. 32. Contact: Tom Graves Company: Tetradian Consulting Email: tom@tetradian.com Twitter: @tetradian ( http://twitter.com/tetradian ) Weblog: http://weblog.tetradian.com Slidedecks: http://www.slideshare.net/tetradian Publications: http://tetradianbooks.com and http://leanpub.com/u/tetradian Books: • The enterprise as story: the role of narrative in enterprise- architecture (2012) • Mapping the enterprise: modelling the enterprise as services with the Enterprise Canvas (2010) • Everyday enterprise-architecture: sensemaking, strategy, structures and solutions (2010) • Doing enterprise-architecture: process and practice in the real enterprise (2009) Further information:

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