Table of Content




                                                                            Page


Abstract          ...
Performance Management System for Teachers
1.


     Since the dawn of capitalism, when the factors of production were cle...
consultants to establish performance management systems (Jones and
    George, 2003).


    It must be noted that, “one si...
Creating a Performance Management Process
2.


     The management of employee performance begins before a new teacher
   ...
engaged, is to hire the candidates with the talent, skills, behavioural
characteristics and drive required because “a pers...
Individual Effectiveness
3.


     There is no doubt that the business of teaching is a labour intensive activity.
     Th...
is a step in the right direction. The results from the new appraisal system
should be the basis of empirical data used for...
Table1

ACCOUNTABILITY MATRIX FOR NATIONAL LITERACY PLAN IMPLEMENTATION

ACTION          AUTHORIZATION        PROCESS     ...
Table 1 (Cont’d)

ACTION              AUTHORIZATION         PROCESS         IMPLEMENTATION TEAM TARGET
                   ...
References


Asthon-Warner, Sylvia (1963) Teacher      –    Sylvia    Asthon-Warner:
Middlesex, England: Penguin Books Ltd...
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Education Ruel Reid Performance Management

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Education Ruel Reid Performance Management

  1. 1. Table of Content Page Abstract i-ii Performance Management System for Teachers 4-5 Creating a Performance Management Process 6-7 Individual Effectiveness 8-9 Accountability Matrix Table 1 – Accountability Matrix for National Literacy Plan Implementation 10-11 Reference 12
  2. 2. Performance Management System for Teachers 1. Since the dawn of capitalism, when the factors of production were clearly defined and combined to maximise profits, the management and motivation of labour has been a key consideration. Henri Taylor’s Scientific Management Theory helped to revolutionize how we organise resources in order to achieve maximum output. Performance Management is the process of creating a work environment, or setting, in which people are enabled to perform to the best of their abilities. Performance Management is an entire work system that begins when a job is defined, as needed, and when an employee leaves the organization, or in an educational institution, when the teacher leaves the school (Heathfield, 2005). Management has evolved into a very scientific activity; the modern paradigm speaks to a balanced scorecard approach. This means that in order to develop good management and accountability there needs to be clarity in the critical success factors and key performance indicators (Jones and George, 2003). These are quantified and measured using various metrics (Laudon and Laudon, 2004). It is from this data that one can construct an efficient performance management system. In the context of a competitive global environment, it is critical that firms adopt best practices that will allow them to stay ahead of the competition. It is against this background, that there is significant room for management 4
  3. 3. consultants to establish performance management systems (Jones and George, 2003). It must be noted that, “one size does not fit all”. The performance management system devised for a sugar manufacturing company is necessarily different from that suitable for a school. In this presentation we will seek to provide practical examples of how to construct a performance management system for a school. An effective performance management system for a school must involve the following actions:  Development of clear job descriptions.  Selection of appropriate teachers through a suitable recruitment and selection process.  Negotiation of requirements and accomplishment-based performance standards, outcomes and measures.  Provision of effective orientation, education, and training.  Provision of on-going coaching, in-service training and feedback.  Conducting quarterly performance development discussions.  Designing of effective compensation and recognition systems that reward teachers for their contributions.  Provision for promotion/career development opportunities for teachers – this is now very limited in education.  Assisting with exit interviews to understand why valued teachers leave the school. 5
  4. 4. Creating a Performance Management Process 2. The management of employee performance begins before a new teacher walks through the doors of the school. Applicants and candidates form opinions of the school throughout the interview process (Heathfield, 2005). Applicants to a school, who never receive a response, form an opinion about you, as an employer. This negative experience may colour the interaction that the ignored applicant goes on to have with other people regarding your school (Heathfield, 2005). First impressions are very important; the goal must be to hire and keep the best teachers. Equipped with the best teachers and support staff, one can develop and manage performance to focus critical contribution on accomplishing the given purpose. Teacher performance must be managed, beginning with the teacher’s first day on the job. In the private sector, a functioning workstation, a prepared, positive orientation experience, initial job expectations and a training plan have a lasting impact on the employee’s attitude about performance (Heathfield, 2005). Of course, some governments believe that once it is education anything goes, but at the same time we want to maximise productivity. Clarity about goals (SMART goals) and direction, frequent feedback, the chance to grow and develop skills create “engaged” employees (Gallup 2001). The most effective way to manage performance and keep employees 6
  5. 5. engaged, is to hire the candidates with the talent, skills, behavioural characteristics and drive required because “a person’s talents do not change much after he or she is hired, and … a person will improve the most in his areas of greatest talent” (Heathfield, 2005). We must insist that our teachers’ colleges attract the best talent for the teaching profession. A successful organization selects talented workers, holds them accountable for performance outcomes, challenges them to realize these outcomes by capitalizing on their greatest talents, and uproots the Peter Principle by offering workers an opportunity to build their careers by building on their greatest talents (Gallup, 2005). This is the challenge for the transformation of the education system. While much has been said about infrastructural improvement, not much has been said about accountability in education. Based on research, The Gallup Organization suggests that there are four disciplines necessary for effective performance management:  Hold all employees accountable for their local performance outcomes;  Teach all employees to identify, deploy, and develop their strengths;  Align all performance appraisal and review systems around identifying, deploying, and developing employee strengths;  Design and build each role to create world class performers in the role. 7
  6. 6. Individual Effectiveness 3. There is no doubt that the business of teaching is a labour intensive activity. There is a call, locally, regionally and internationally, for improved performance of the education system. One of the weaknesses of these discussions is the lack of consensus on how learning takes place, the modalities of assessing learning outcomes and whether, or not, teachers are really responsible for students’ academic achievement. Since it is the predominant view that teachers are the main factors in facilitating student learning, empowerment of teachers is critical to the maximization of performance. Teachers should be facilitated in continuous upgrading and should have available resource persons and specialist help for children with special needs. The performance of teachers is limited in a teaching-learning environment comprising a group of students with too much diversity in ability or achievement (Asthon-Warner, 1963). As the saying goes “he who feels it knows it,” principals and supervisors must engage themselves with teachers, and facilitate them in resolving learning difficulties; they must provide support for innovation and unconventional methods of teaching. A society, such as Jamaica, that has a major deficit in Standard English requires a more organic approach to the business of formal education at the early stages (Asthon-Warner, 1963). In this regard, the training and upgrading process in subject specialization and methodology should be complemented with empowerment training programs. The introduction of a system-wide standardised appraisal system 8
  7. 7. is a step in the right direction. The results from the new appraisal system should be the basis of empirical data used for needs assessment and strategic interventions to facilitate development and empowerment of our Jamaican teachers (Harvey and Brown, 2001). 9
  8. 8. Table1 ACCOUNTABILITY MATRIX FOR NATIONAL LITERACY PLAN IMPLEMENTATION ACTION AUTHORIZATION PROCESS IMPLEMENTATION TEAM TARGET NATIONAL OWNER LEADER AUDIENCE LITERACY TARGET Development of Minister of Education Chief Education Deputy Chief Education Students in National Literacy and Permanent Officer (CEO) Officer-Curriculum Support primary and Policy Secretary Services (DCEO-CSS) and lower 100% National Literacy Coordinator secondary schools (grades 1- 9) Development of CEO DCEO-CSS, Regional Directors, Regional Education National Literacy DCEO- Literacy Coordinators, Officers Plan Operations, Principals (Eos), 100% National Literacy Curriculum Coordinator Officers, Principals, Literacy Specialists Professional DCEO-CSS, DCEO- DCEO- Professional Development Principals Development Operations Operations, Unit for in-service, Teachers Teachers, Training in Regional Colleges for pre-service, CoreSpecialists 100% Literacy Directors Curriculum Unit, National Programme Literacy Coordinator Lesson Delivery CEO, DCEO- Regional Principals, Teachers, School Students at Operations Directors, Based Literacy Specialists Grades 1-9 Education (SBLS) Officers, 100% Regional Literacy Coordinators (RLCs) 10
  9. 9. Table 1 (Cont’d) ACTION AUTHORIZATION PROCESS IMPLEMENTATION TEAM TARGET OWNER LEADER AUDIENCE Evaluation and CEO, Chief Inspector, Head Student SBACs, Teachers, Eos, Principals, Assessment of Regional Directors Assessment Principals, SBLCs, RLCs, Teachers, performance Unit, PME&U Officers, Inspectors Students Programme Monitoring & Evaluation Unit (PME&U), Head Core Curriculum Unit, National Literacy Coordinator Feedback & CEO, Chief Inspector DCEO- Eos, RLCs, SBLCs, Principals Teachers, response Operations, Students PME&U Head, Regional Directors, National Literacy Coordinator Notes: Responsibility flows along the lines of action (row) from the level of the action At each level where the process is authorized, owned and or implemented an accountability matr developed to track and account for performance of tasks.
  10. 10. References Asthon-Warner, Sylvia (1963) Teacher – Sylvia Asthon-Warner: Middlesex, England: Penguin Books Ltd Davis, Honourable, Dr. Rae (2004). Task Force on Education Report Gallup Management Journal (2005).Retrieved on August 31, 2005 at: http://gmj.gallup.com/ Gordon, Winsome. Licensing of Teachers in Jamaica. Draft Procedures for implementation. Heathfield, S. (2005). About: Performance Management. Retrieved July 19, 2005: http: //humanresources.about.com/od/glossaryp/g/perform_mgmt_p.htm Jones, G. & George, J. (2003). Contemporary Management. New York: McGraw-Hill. Laudon, K, & Laudon, J. (2004). Management Information Systems: Managing the Digital Firm. New Jersey: Prentice Hall. The Jamaica Teaching Council. Kingston, Jamaica. 12

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