Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Анализ по размерам бюджета

108 views

Published on

Частный английский юридический журнал Global Competition Review

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Анализ по размерам бюджета

  1. 1. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 1/20 RATING ENFORCEMENT 2016 ANALYSIS: PART 2 Wednesday, 6 July 2016 (2 weeks ago) Buy PDF Share via e­mail Rating Enforcement: Analysis Part 2 Table 12: Budget Authority Budget in millions of euros US (DOJ) 144 US (FTC) 112.6 DG Comp 97.7 Japan 85.5 Korea 80.4 Russia 67.4 Australia 48 Italy 46.8 UK 35 Germany 28.8 Canada 28.3 Mexico 24.3 India 24 Spain 22.9 Turkey 20.3 France 19.9 Sweden 15
  2. 2. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 2/20 Netherlands 14.6 Ireland 12 Denmark 11.6 Chile 10.5 Norway 10.5 Switzerland 10.3 Singapore 10 Brazil 9.1 Romania 9.1 Czech Republic 8.5 Belgium 8.4 Israel 8 New Zealand 8 Greece 7.7 Portugal 7.3 Colombia 6.8 Finland 6 Austria 2.84 Poland 2.8 Pakistan 1.7 Lithuania 1 Latvia 1 The DoJ’s antitrust division is both a civil and criminal enforcer of competition law in the US – and with regard to its cartel enforcement against foreign companies, some criticise it as the world’s would­be policeman. It has a €144 million budget to fit the task, topping the table once again with a small increase over 2014. This contrasts with the US FTC’s downtick from €115.5 million in fiscal year 2014 to €112.6 million in 2015. Korea’s Fair Trade Commission showed that much can be done even if belts are being taken in a notch. Despite a year­on­year budget decline from €95.2 million to €80.4 million, the KFTC turned in a five­ star performance, drawing high praise from practitioners and hitting every note of cartel, merger, unilateral conduct and advocacy work.
  3. 3. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 3/20 Meanwhile, Japan’s Fair Trade Commission barely hung on to the four­and­a­half stars it has held for several editions of Rating Enforcement, despite what Baker & McKenzie partner Junya Ae says was an increase in its competition enforcement budget. He adds that Japanese practitioners are wondering why the JFTC is less active when enforcing against international cartels. Belgium illustrates another difficulty for an antitrust enforcer: a decent budget for the size of the private­sector economy, but the authority is being held back from spending it as it would like. While only 51% of the agency’s budget actually went to salary last year, 70% had been allocated for that purpose. A recent reorganisation as an independent agency, and resulting confusion about the status of the authority’s employees, impedes the hiring of new staff. This in turns affects the ability of Belgium’s competition authority to promptly handle leniency applications and big deals such as Delhaize/Ahold. Table 13: Proportion of budget spent on salary Authority Per cent spent on salary Netherlands 93 Latvia 91 Switzerland 88 DG Comp 86.5 Romania 85 UK 84 Germany 81 Mexico 80 France 79 Norway 78 Italy 75 Japan 75 Portugal 75 Sweden 75 Austria 74 Russia 70
  4. 4. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 4/20 Russia 70 Singapore 69 Denmark 65 US (FTC) 65 Canada 64 Israel 62.5 Ireland 60 Pakistan 60 US (DOJ) 60 Lithuania 59 Finland 58 Chile 55 Belgium 51 Poland 51 Turkey 51 Greece 48 Czech Republic 41 Australia 39 Spain 38 Korea 35 New Zealand 34 Brazil 28 Colombia 27 India 9.5 A record €3.45 trillion was spent on global mergers and acquisitions in 2015 according to data compiled by Bloomberg. It is no surprise that the majority of jurisdictions participating in Rating Enforcement saw a bump in the number of merger filings they received during 2015. As in 2014, Russia, the US DoJ, the US FTC, Germany and Korea all received the largest number of notifications. The latter four all reported spikes in merger filings compared to 2014, as did Australia, the EU, France and the UK. Russia continues to handle significantly more mergers than any other authority, although the number of mergers filed in 2015 was down
  5. 5. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 5/20 compared to 2014, from 2,246 to 1958 – likely because of Russia’s weakening economy. In 2014, it handled 600 more notifications than the US DoJ, but that difference has now dropped below 200. Meanwhile, the DoJ’s filings rose by more than 150 and the US FTC’s by more than 100. Only 10 other authorities experienced a decline in merger notifications, seven of which were European. Brazil, New Zealand and Canada also saw reduced merger activity, with filings at the latter down by almost 20%, potentially because slightly higher notification thresholds were introduced in early 2015. Table 14: Number of mergers filed Authority Merger filings Population* US (DOJ) 1,801 (jointly with FTC) 321,368,864 Russia 1,958 142,423,773 US (FTC) 1,754 321,368,864 Germany 1,219 80,854,408 Korea 669 49,115,196 Brazil 404 204,259,812 Austria 366 8,665,550 Australia 350 22,751,014 DG Comp 337 513,949,445 Japan 296 126,919,659 Poland 228 38,562,189 France 218 66,553,766 Turkey 205 79,414,269 Canada 204 35,099,836 Israel 159 8,049,314 Mexico 141 121,736,809 India 127 1,251,695,584 Norway 96 5,207,689 Spain 93 48,146,134 Netherlands 89 16,947,904 Pakistan 83 199,085,847 Ireland 78 4,892,305
  6. 6. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 6/20 UK 71 64,088,222 Sweden 61 9,801,616 Portugal 60 10,825,309 Colombia 51 46,736,728 Italy 51 61,855,120 Denmark 42 5,581,503 Romania 40 21,666,350 Lithuania 38 2,884,433 Belgium 32 11,323,973 Czech Republic 31 10,644,842 Switzerland 29 8,121,830 Finland 26 5,476,922 Latvia 18 1,986,705 New Zealand 12 4,438,393 Greece 8 10,775,643 Chile 6 17,508,260 Singapore 5 5,674,472 * Source: CIA World Factbook Table 15: Mergers that led to in­depth review Authority No. of mergers that led to an in­depth review Per cent of mergers that led to an in­depth review New Zealand 12 100 Pakistan 68 82 Latvia 10 56 Colombia 26 50.98 Greece 3 38 Singapore 1 20 Italy 7 18 Canada 33 16 Belgium 5 15.50 Brazil 61 15 UK 11 15 Lithuania 5 13 Switzerland 3 10 Israel 15 9
  7. 7. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 7/20 Israel 15 9 Norway 9 9 Russia 185 9 Finland 2 8 Denmark 3 7 Mexico 10 7 Sweden 4 7 Netherlands 5 6 Korea 32 5 Australia 13 4 Ireland 3 4 Portugal 2 3.33 DG Comp 11 3 US (DOJ) 32 3 Poland 7 2.50 US (FTC) 20 2.28 Japan 6 2 Austria 5 1.40 Germany 13 1 Spain 1 1 Turkey 2 1 India 1 0.80 Czech Republic 0 0 France 0 0 Romania 0 0 Chile 16 (voluntary MR) Not available It takes experience to assess if a deal warrants further scrutiny, so historically, younger enforcers have tended to send a larger proportion of filed mergers to an in­depth review compared to their more mature counterparts. It is the first time Pakistan has featured in the Rating Enforcement survey and it jumps straight to second in the table, having sent a whopping 82% of its 83 mergers to an in­depth review. It sits only behind New Zealand, which unsurprisingly tops the list, because its voluntary regime subjects all filed mergers to thorough scrutiny. The proportion
  8. 8. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 8/20 of Latvia’s Phase II reviews rose from 36% to 56%, the third­highest in the table, while Colombia and new entrant Singapore scrutinised 51% and 20% of all mergers respectively. Meanwhile, the number of Phase II’s in Greece dropped from 50% to 38%. The European Commission and other leading agencies in the US, Germany, France, Japan and Korea continued to register single digits, sending 5% or less of all filed mergers to Phase II. Elsewhere, the Czech Republic slashed the proportion of in­depth probes from 11% to zero, while Poland, which previously subjected all mergers to further scrutiny, sent only 2.5% of mergers to Phase II, following the introduction of a new regime at the beginning of the year. Table 16: Number of mergers challenged Authority No. of mergers challenged Per cent of mergers challenged Chile 3 50 Singapore 2 40 Greece 3 38 UK 11 15 Italy 5 10 New Zealand 1 8.25 Portugal 4 6.66 DG Comp 22 6.5 Belgium 2 6 Latvia 1 6 Russia 119 6 Norway 5 5 Denmark 2 4.75 Canada 9 4.5 Colombia 2 4 Finland 1 4 Pakistan 3 4 Israel 6 3.75 Mexico 4 3 Netherlands 3 3
  9. 9. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 9/20 France 7 2.75 Lithuania 1 2.6 Australia 8 2.25 Brazil 8 2 Japan 6 2 Sweden 1 2 Turkey 4 2 US (FTC) 22 1.25 Korea 8 1 US (DoJ) 20 1 Austria 3 0.82 Poland 1 0.4 Germany 4 0.33 Czech 0 0 India 0 0 Romania 0 0 Spain 0 0 Switzerland 0 0 Ireland Not a proper answer Not a proper answer Table 17: Proportion of challenged mergers blocked Authority No. of challenged mergers blocked Per cent of challenged mergers blocked Ireland Not available Not available Lithuania 1 100 New Zealand 1 100 Sweden 1 100 Colombia 1 50 Singapore 1 50 Russia 54 45 Netherlands 1 33 Germany 1 25 Mexico 1 25 Turkey 1 25 Canada 2 22 Brazil 1 13 US (FTC) 2 9 Australia 0 0
  10. 10. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 10/20 Austria 0 0 Belgium 0 0 Chile 0 0 Czech Republic 0 0 Denmark 0 0 DG Comp 0 0 Finland 0 0 France 0 0 Greece 0 0 India 0 0 Israel 0 0 Italy 0 0 Japan 0 0 Korea 0 0 Latvia 0 0 Norway 0 0 Pakistan 0 0 Poland 0 0 Portugal 0 0 Romania 0 0 Spain 0 0 Switzerland 0 0 UK 0 0 US (DOJ) 0 0 Chile once again tops the list of challenged mergers table (see table 16), having contested 50% of all mergers that were filed in 2015, although this figure is half the 100% record it maintained in 2014. Pre­merger notification is voluntary under Chile’s merger regime, and of the deals it challenged, zero were blocked. New entrant Singapore challenged 40% of the five mergers that were filed in 2015, blocking half of the deals it contested, while Greece also challenged nearly two­fifths of the eight mergers that were filed in Athens – the same percentage as in 2014, but half the actual number of deals. Of the 10 authorities who topped the table in 2014, none challenged
  11. 11. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 11/20 a higher proportion of deals in 2015. Indeed, only nine enforcers overall posted more aggressive figures in 2015, and of those, only Latvia and Italy saw more than a 5% spike – from zero to 6%, and 2% to 10% respectively. Elsewhere, the number of deals challenged in the Czech Republic dropped to zero, down from 11% in 2014, moving the enforcer from fourth in the table to joint bottom alongside India, Ireland, Romania, Spain and Switzerland, all of which failed to contest a merger. Russia once again challenged the largest number of deals, contesting 119 in total, six times more than its closest competitors, the US FTC, US DoJ and the EU. It wasn’t a noteworthy year for many of the world’s leading enforcers, based on this metric. None of DG Comp, France, Japan, Korea or Australia blocked any deals. The US DoJ and FTC challenged 1% of all mergers, with the latter blocking 9%, but the former didn’t reject any. Fewer than half of the survey’s participating authorities reported any challenged mergers that were subsequently abandoned by the parties during 2015. Israel very much bucked this trend, as 83% of the six mergers challenged by its Antitrust Authority were abandoned. This is not just a huge increase on last year – when zero mergers were abandoned – but also marks a stark swing away from its record of resolving most of its challenged mergers with remedies. In 2014, four out of five deals were resolved with remedies, but in 2015 figure this dropped below 20%. Japan and Mexico also reported a sharp increase in abandoned
  12. 12. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 12/20 mergers, with 50% of all challenged deals abandoned in each jurisdiction – both up from zero in 2014. Meanwhile the proportion of mergers abandoned in Germany dropped from 84% to 50% – from 10 to two overall. Elsewhere, the US DoJ challenged 20 mergers, half of which were subsequently abandoned – the largest number in the survey and the only enforcer to report double digits in this field. It is also double what it reported in 2014. Many of the world’s leading enforcers continued to strike fear into the companies whose deals they contested, with at least one deal collapsing following a challenge in Japan, Germany, Australia, the US, France and Korea. Three­quarters of all jurisdictions resolved at least one merger with remedies, while more than half of all jurisdictions resolved at least 50% of all challenged mergers. Once again Russia topped the table, although the number of deals it resolved dropped by more than half. The UK, DG Comp, the US FTC and US DoJ were the only enforcers to approve 10 or more deals with remedies. The UK improved its remedies record, which jumped from zero to 84% of all challenged mergers. Seven agencies meanwhile cleared all of their challenged deals with remedies. Of those authorities who experienced a drop in remedies decisions, Ireland’s was the starkest, declining from 100% to zero, although the actual numbers dropped from just one to zero. Lithuania, Spain and New Zealand witnessed drops from 67% and 50% respectively. Table 18: Proportion of challenged mergers abandoned No. of challenged Per cent of challenged
  13. 13. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 13/20 Authority mergers abandoned mergers abandoned Russia Not available Not available Ireland Not available Not available Israel 5 83 Germany 2 50 Japan 3 50 Mexico 2 50 Portugal 2 50 Singapore 1 50 US (DOJ) 10 50 Chile 1 33 UK 3 27 Australia 2 25 Italy 1 20 US (FTC) 4 18 France 1 14 Greece 1 12.5 Korea 1 12.5 DG Comp 2 9 Austria 0 0 Belgium 0 0 Brazil 0 0 Canada 0 0 Colombia 0 0 Czech Republic 0 0 Denmark 0 0 Finland 0 0 India 0 0 Latvia 0 0 Lithuania 0 0 Netherlands 0 0 New Zealand 0 0 Norway 0 0 Pakistan 0 0 Poland 0 0 Romania 0 0 Spain 0 0 Sweden 0 0
  14. 14. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 14/20 Switzerland 0 0 Turkey 0 0 Table 19: Proportion of mergers resolved with remedies Authority No. of challenged mergers resolved with remedies Per cent of challenged mergers resolved with remedies Ireland Not available Not available Belgium 2 100 Denmark 2 100 Finland 1 100 Latvia 1 100 Norway 5 100 Poland 1 100 UK 11 100 DG Comp 20 91 Brazil 7 88 Korea 7 87.5 France 6 86 Italy 4 80 Canada 7 78 US (FTC) 17 77 Australia 6 75 Mexico 3 75 Turkey 3 75 Chile 2 67 Austria 2 66 Pakistan 2 66 Russia 65 55 Colombia 1 50 Japan 3 50 Portugal 2 50 US (DOJ) 10 50 Netherlands 1 33 Germany 1 25 Israel 1 17 Czech Republic 0 0 Greece 0 0
  15. 15. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 15/20 India 0 0 Lithuania 0 0 New Zealand 0 0 Romania 0 0 Singapore 0 0 Spain 0 0 Sweden 0 0 Switzerland 0 0 Table 20: Average length of an in­depth merger review Authority Average length of in­ depth merger review (in days) Portugal 225 Chile 199 Netherlands 194 Spain 180 UK 180 Poland 162 Turkey 155 Ireland 150 Norway 150 Colombia 144 Denmark 135 Singapore 120 Germany 117 Sweden 115 DG Comp 112.5 Austria 105 Latvia 96 Finland 90 Greece 90 Japan 90 Mexico 87 Switzerland 75­90 Brazil 82 Australia 77 Israel 74.5 New Zealand 64
  16. 16. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 16/20 New Zealand 64 Lithuania 63 Italy 62 Canada 48 Belgium 46 Korea 26.5 Pakistan 14­21 US (FTC) Not available Czech Republic Not available France Not available India Not available Romania Not available Russia Not available US (DOJ) Not available For the third year in a row, we asked competition enforcers how long it took, on average, to conclude an in­depth merger review. Although the statistics can be skewed depending on how many in­depth investigations are opened in one given year and when a merger’s clock officially begins, the data gives some indication of the general timing of a Phase II review in these jurisdictions. The majority of enforcers take between three and five months to review a complex deal and decide on a course of action. Portugal and the Netherlands once again appear at the top of the table – this time alongside Chile – in taking the longest amount of time to complete a review. The Netherlands, however, dropped from first to third, after shaving 45 days off of an average review. Portugal now tops the list: its reviews in 2015 on average took seven­and­a­half months to conclude, despite launching only two Phase II investigations last year. In Pakistan and Korea, in­depth reviews last less than a month. Korea usually takes 26 days to complete a review, while Pakistan ordinarily completes an in­depth merger investigation within two to
  17. 17. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 17/20 three weeks – perhaps unsurprising given that the enforcer scrutinised 82% of the 83 mergers filed in 2015, with only 30 competition enforcement staffers. Enforcers must be efficient when examining deals to prevent a backlog of cases. Broadly speaking, those enforcers who initiate the most in­depth reviews tend to take less time completing their investigations. Elsewhere, Canada and Belgium continue to keep their Phase II reviews shorter than two months on average. A number of authorities trimmed the amount of time it took to review complex deals in 2015, with Austria, Germany, Belgium and the EU all taking between 35 and 45 days less on average to conclude their investigations; the European Commission saw the average duration of an in­depth review return to 2013 levels after witnessing a steep climb in 2014. The average wait time in Poland jumped from two months to 162 days. Poland previously subjected all mergers to in­depth scrutiny, but in 2015 it sent only 2.5% of mergers to Phase II, following the introduction of a new regime at the beginning of the year. Turkey meanwhile extended the average length of an in­depth merger investigation from just 16 days to five months – nearly a tenfold increase.
  18. 18. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 18/20 (Click for larger image) Table 21: Number of first­in leniency applications Authority No. of first­in leniency applications Russia 35 Canada 33 Germany 28 Brazil 22 UK 22 Australia 17 Austria 12 France 8 Mexico 8
  19. 19. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 19/20 Mexico 8 Singapore 6 Romania 5 New Zealand 3 Norway 3 Chile 1 India 1 Latvia 1 Portugal 1 Turkey 1 Belgium 0 Israel 0 Lithuania 0 Pakistan 0 South Africa was, by some distance, the top enforcer for first­in leniency applications last year, breaking into triple figures with an impressive 115 filings. This year, however, the agency declined to take part in Rating Enforcement, so whether this year saw a repeat of that spike in applications – caused by the agency’s Construction Settlements Project – is unknown. We also are unable to report whether its unusual presence at the top of the leniency applications table was also repeated this year, but it seems unlikely. Broadly, things are back to normal on the first­in scene, with the ever­ hyperactive Russia bagging the top spot. Coming right in afterwards are Canada, which took third place last year, Germany, the UK and Brazil, and Australia. The top five is more or less business as usual. The UK and Brazil are new entrants. Otherwise, Canada, Germany and Australia roughly maintain their positions from last year’s survey, and while the Federal Cartel Office has dipped from 42 to 33 filings, the numbers are for the most part steady. Lower down the table, it’s clear that Belgium had a poor year for attracting whistleblowers: from six applications in 2014 to zero new
  20. 20. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 2 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41412/analysis­part­2 20/20 Copyright © 2016 Law Business Research Ltd. All rights reserved. | http://www.lbresearch.com 87 Lancaster Road, London, W11 1QQ, UK | Tel: +44 207 908 1188 / Fax: +44 207 229 6910 http://www.globcompetitionreview.com | editorial@globalcompetitionreview.com leniency files last year. Israel, Lithuania and Pakistan join the agency at the bottom, having received no first­in applications. The Pakistani authority appears in Rating Enforcement for the first time; it’s worth noting that the authority had a quiet year in 2014 and handed down only €1.18 million in cartel fines last year. If the number of first­in applications Germany received sagged in 2015, the broader leniency picture looks much healthier: it received only four fewer applications last year than in 2014, coming to a total of 76. And once again, the absence of South Africa has evened things out a little in the top ranks of the leniency applications table: usual suspects like Japan, Canada, Russia, DG Comp and Australia return to the top of our list, with Brazil a new entrant in second place. Meanwhile, it was an exceptionally good year for Mexico, which saw a tripling of its number of applications from six to 18 – that’s one fewer than Australia, and only six fewer than the UK.

×