Successfully reported this slideshow.
We use your LinkedIn profile and activity data to personalize ads and to show you more relevant ads. You can change your ad preferences anytime.

Анализ количества сотрудников антимонопольных органов (2016)

131 views

Published on

частный английский юридический журнал Global Competition Review

Published in: Business
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

Анализ количества сотрудников антимонопольных органов (2016)

  1. 1. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 1/21 RATING ENFORCEMENT 2016 ANALYSIS: PART 1 Wednesday, 6 July 2016 (2 weeks ago) Buy PDF Share via e­mail Rating Enforcement: Analysis Part 1 It remained the case, throughout 2015, that the authorities with the biggest staff are among the best in the world; however, there are some notable outliers in that simple analysis. Year after year, the biggest authority is always Russia’s Federal Antimonopoly Service, which covers enormous territory and delves into even small mergers. Other agencies that have responsibility for more than antitrust show high total staff numbers. For example, Colombia, which is new to Rating Enforcement, tasks its Superintendence of Industry and Commerce with protecting consumers and intellectual property as well as competition. The US Federal Trade Commission, Japan’s Fair Trade Commission, and the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission also look after consumer protection in addition to their antitrust mandate. Meanwhile some authorities, notably in Germany and France, perform excellently despite not having a huge staff. But in general, the large workforces being at the top of the table makes sense, as they are policing some of the world’s biggest economies.
  2. 2. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 2/21 For new entrant Romania, a sizeable staff has not necessarily translated to effectiveness, even though it sits in the top half of the table. Singapore, another new entrant, debuts as one of the better authorities in the world, despite having just 62 total staff. Chile’s authority is still an example of an agency that punches above its weight, remaining one of the best enforcers in Latin America despite having only 120 staff. Table 1: Size by number of staff Authority No. of staff Russia 3,260 Colombia 1,200 US (FTC) 1,162 Japan 838 Australia 780 DG Comp 752 US (DOJ) 697 UK 599 Netherlands 54 Korea 535 Spain 515 Poland 464 Canada 394 Mexico 384 Brazil 349 Germany 347 Turkey 340 Romania 313 Italy 287 Denmark 254 Czech Republic 226 New Zealand 209 France 194 Sweden 177 Pakistan 145 Finland 123
  3. 3. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 3/21 Israel 121 Chile 120 Norway 101 Greece 94 Ireland 86 Portugal 82 Switzerland 76 Lithuania 66 Singapore 62 Latvia 46 Belgium 41 Austria 34 (Click for larger image) Table 2: Proportion of competition staff Authority No. of staff Chile 100 DG Comp 100 India 100 Latvia 100 Norway 100 Switzerland 100 US (DOJ) 100 Belgium 95 Japan 93 Korea 89 Israel 88 France 87 Austria 79
  4. 4. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 4/21 Austria 79 Russia 78 Portugal 77 Sweden 73 Germany 71 Greece 68 Lithuania 68 Canada 67 Singapore 66 Mexico 65 Romania 63 Brazil 45 Finland 45 New Zealand 44 UK 44 Italy 42 Australia 41 Turkey 36 Denmark 34 Netherlands 32 Spain 32 Poland 31 US (FTC) 30 Czech Republic 26 Ireland 26 Pakistan 21 Colombia 8 There is little correlation between the percentage of total staff focusing on competition and the performance of the agencies, at least for the top enforcers. Three of the weaker competition enforcers in our rankings – Ireland, the Czech Republic and Pakistan – have some of the lowest percentages of total staff working on competition, as many instead are devoted to consumer protection. The main outliers are India and Belgium: countries that struggle with competition enforcement despite having 100% and 95% respectively of their staff focused on it.
  5. 5. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 5/21 Regarding the best enforcers in the world, there is much less correlation – while the DoJ’s antitrust division has 100% of its staff focus on competition, the FTC only has 30%, with France and Germany falling in between. Any attempt to determine whether a purely competition­oriented versus a mixed mission that includes consumer protection is better has to contend with the two US antitrust agencies representing both models and performing well year after year. Table 3: Net employee gain/loss Authority Competition Staff 2014 Competition Staff 2013 No. gained Russia 705 514 191 US (DOJ) 130 66 64 Mexico 87 36 51 US (FTC) 81 54 27 DG Comp 83 62 21 India 36 20 16 UK 37 22 15 Australia 41 28 13 Colombia 19 7 12 Denmark 20 8 12 Netherlands 12 4 8 Pakistan 12 4 8 Canada 29 25 4 Singapore 6 2 4 Israel 17 14 3 New Zealand 21 18 3 Norway 9 6 3 Poland 13 10 3 Latvia 9 7 2 Romania 9 7 2 Austria 3 2 1 Brazil 33 32 1 Switzerland 3 2 1 Germany 4 4 0 Spain 8 8 0
  6. 6. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 6/21 Belgium 1 2 ­1 Chile 16 17 ­1 Lithuania 7 8 ­1 Czech Republic 1 3 ­2 France 17 19 ­2 Italy 0 2 ­2 Sweden 12 14 ­2 Finland 4 9 ­5 Greece 0 5 ­5 Ireland 0 6 ­6 Portugal 1 7 ­6 Korea 21 36 ­15 Turkey 0 15 ­15 Japan 63 84 ­21 Last year demonstrated again that massive fluctuations in staff size are rare at competition authorities. In general, 2015 was a good year for the authorities’ hiring, with most staffs growing in size. Six antitrust agencies had new employees represent double­digit percentages of their staff – most notably Pakistan, which grew 27% to 30 competition enforcers, and Mexico, which added 51 workers to an already robust agency for a 20% growth. But it was not a good year for everyone. The Turkish Competition Authority lost about 10% of its staff, and some of the smaller authorities also lost close to that amount. In those agencies, the effects of gaining or losing even a few people are felt much more than somewhere like the Russian authority, which constantly has a competition staff of at least 2,000 workers. Notably, the US Department of Justice and Federal Trade Commission continue to grow – each of the agencies’ competition enforcement staffs grew by almost 10% in fiscal year 2015, as they continued to rebound from the budget cuts and hiring freezes of what antitrust division chief Bill Baer called the “inexplicable” government
  7. 7. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 7/21 shutdown in 2013. Obviously there is a glaring hole in the FTC’s upper echelon, with only three of the five commissioners present. No signs indicate that Joshua Wright’s and Julie Brill’s seats will be filled in the midst of a presidential election and Democrat Barack Obama’s final year facing a majority­Republican Senate. The numbers continue to defy logic in terms of keeping agencies lean and employing a small percentage of administrative staff in a competition authority (see table 4). At the top of the list – where in some cases the agency has no administrative competition staff – are India, Ireland and Turkey, three authorities that have had a tough time with competition enforcement. At the other end of the list – the agencies that have the highest percentage of administrative staff – are some world­class enforcers, including the DoJ and DG Comp, as well as Germany and Spain. As was the case in last year’s Rating Enforcement, Japan remains the outlier in this analysis, with 96% of its 777 competition employees working in a non­administrative role. Of particular note, however, is the FTC’s effort to become leaner. In 2014 a whopping 42% of the competition staff was administrative; in 2015 that number fell to 10%. Table 4: Percentage of non­administrative staff Authority Per cent of competition staff Per cent of total staff who are NAC staff (enforcers) India 100 100 Japan 93 89 Israel 88 83 Latvia 100 83 Chile 100 82 Belgium 95 80 Switzerland 100 80 US (DOJ) 100 78 Norway 100 75
  8. 8. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 8/21 Austria 79 74 France 87 69 Korea 89 68 Sweden 73 67 Russia 78 65 Lithuania 68 64 Portugal 77 64 Singapore 66 64 DG Comp 100 63 Greece 68 61 Romania 63 61 Canada 67 55 Mexico 65 54 Germany 71 43 Finland 45 41 New Zealand 44 40 Australia 41 38 UK 44 38 Turkey 36 36 Brazil 45 35 Italy 42 34 Denmark 34 32 Netherlands 32 28 Poland 31 28 US (FTC) 30 27 Ireland 26 26 Czech Republic 26 24 Spain 32 21 Pakistan 21 16 Colombia 8 7 Statistics show that very often, less established authorities have a higher percentage of women working on competition enforcement matters than those authorities that top our table. For the second year in a row, Greece, Lithuania and Latvia have the highest percentages of women enforcers compared to other enforcers. Additionally, the Lithuanian Competition Council’s proportion of women to men
  9. 9. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 9/21 increased by 7% from 2014 to 2015, moving it to the top of the list. It’s important to note that Lithuania and Latvia are two of the smallest agencies in our survey; both have fewer than 50 total competition enforcement staff. Meanwhile, Korea and Japan appear at the bottom of our list; each boast staff of more than 400 and 700 people, respectively. Table 5: Proportion of female staff Authority Per cent female staff Per cent male staff Lithuania 19 81 Latvia 22 78 Greece 25 75 Russia 38 62 Italy 39 61 Portugal 39 61 Canada 41 59 Colombia 41 59 UK 41 59 Australia 42 58 Spain 42 58 US (FTC) 42 58 Denmark 43 57 Romania 43 57 France 48 52 Poland 48 52 Chile 49 51 Czech Republic 49 51 Norway 49 51 Sweden 49 51 DG Comp 51 49 Finland 51 49 Belgium 52 48 Singapore 52 48 US (DOJ) 55 45 Brazil 56 44 Germany 56 44 Mexico 56 44
  10. 10. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 10/21 Mexico 56 44 Turkey 56 44 Netherlands 57 43 New Zealand 57 43 Pakistan 57 43 Israel 60 40 Austria 64 36 India 64 36 Switzerland 65 35 Korea 68 32 Japan 80 20 Table 6: Average age of competition enforcers Authority Average age of non­ admin staff Korea 45 Belgium 44 Portugal 44 Romania 44 Germany 44 Italy 43.6 Spain 43 Canada 42 Japan 42 Netherlands 42 New Zealand 42 US (FTC) 42 Greece 41 Sweden 41 UK 41 DG Comp 40.5 Finland 40 France 39.4 Austria 39 Poland 39 Switzerland 37.5 Australia 37 Denmark 37 Norway 37
  11. 11. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 11/21 Norway 37 Chile 36 Colombia 36 Lithuania 36 Russia 36 Czech Republic 35 Israel 35 Latvia 35 Turkey 33.4 Singapore 33 Mexico 32 Pakistan 32 Brazil 31 Practitioners interviewed by GCR frequently commented on the professionalism of staff that conduct merger reviews, cartel cases and abuse of dominance investigations. Lawyers tended to give higher praise to authorities’ units with more experienced enforcers, as they tend to handle cases more efficiently. There also appears to be a clear correlation between the average age of competition enforcers and the average tenure of enforcers’ staff; authorities with the highest average age of employees also tend to have the longest average tenures. For the second year in a row, Korea’s Fair Trade Commission (KFTC) came in first in both categories. Japan, Germany and Italy have also consistently placed high on the two tables, although the Korean authority significantly outpaces its peers with an average tenure of 25 years. Meanwhile, Mexico and Brazil once again remained at the bottom of the pair of lists. Spain, however, seems to not follow the pattern – the average age of the authority’s staff was 43, while the average tenure is relatively low at four­and­a­half years, lagging behind several peer agencies. The majority of authorities reported an average staff member age of less than 40, and more than two­thirds
  12. 12. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 12/21 of the countries surveyed had employees with an average tenure of fewer than 10 years. Overall, the average tenure of staff at authorities remained relatively consistent from 2014 to 2015, with only minor changes. The means at agencies including Switzerland, Italy and the European Union decreased by a year or less, while Sweden’s and Australia’s averages held steady at six and seven years, respectively. Belgium, Germany and Poland saw modest increases of only a year. Table 7: Average tenure of enforcers’ staff Authority Average tenure of non­ admin staff (years) Korea 25 Japan 16.8 Germany 12 Belgium 11 US (FTC) 11 Canada 10 Italy 10 Poland 10 Romania 10 Finland 9.5 Netherlands 8.5 Turkey 8.4 Portugal 7.9 Australia 7 DG Comp 7 Lithuania 7 New Zealand 7 Greece 6.5 Latvia 6.5 Switzerland 6.5 Sweden 6 Denmark 5.8 Norway 5.5 Chile 5.2
  13. 13. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 13/21 Chile 5.2 France 5.1 Pakistan 5 Czech Republic 5 Russia 4.5 Spain 4.5 Israel 4 Singapore 3.6 Brazil 3 Colombia 3 UK 1.25 Mexico 1 Table 8: Proportion of enforcers’ staff with more than five years’ experience in the private sector Authority No. of staff with more than 5 years in private sector No. of non­ admin staff Per cent non­admin staff with more than 5 years' private sector experience Portugal 28 63 44 Italy 38 121 31 Latvia 14 46 30 Sweden 35 130 27 France 35 168 21 Greece 12 64 19 Netherlands 33 176 19 Belgium 7 39 18 Russia 423 2553 17 India 16 103 16 Norway 14 101 14 Singapore 5 41 12 Austria 3 27 11 Denmark 8 87 9 Finland 5 55 9 Israel 6 106 6 UK 12 264 5 Lithuania 2 45 4 Chile 5 120 4 Korea 15 475 3 Spain 4 163 2
  14. 14. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 14/21 Japan 18 777 2 Poland 3 142 2 Germany 5 247 2 Czech Republic 0 58 0 Pakistan 0 30 0 Romania 0 197 0 Turkey 0 122 0 Similar to staff experience at an authority, the number of attorneys with exposure to the private sector can also improve the competency and effectiveness of a competition enforcer. Attorneys who have worked on both sides of the aisle are often better at communicating with opposing counsel, particularly when it comes to merger reviews. Several authorities surveyed by GCR declined to report their number of staff with more than five years of private practice experience. But many countries did, and those that sit atop the table – Portugal, Italy and Latvia – all saw significant declines in their percentages of non­ administrative staff with more than five years’ private sector experience. Portugal’s Competition Authority dropped from 51% last year, but remains at the top. Meanwhile, the Latvian and Italian agencies declined from 48% and 40%, respectively. Several other authorities – France, Greece, Belgium and Russia, for example – also reported decreases in their numbers. Meanwhile, India, Israel and Sweden saw noteworthy growth in staff with five­plus years of private sector experience. While only having one such staff member last year, Israel now has six employees with a meaningful amount of private bar experience. It is important to note that although there are benefits for authorities to employ attorneys that have worked in private practice, many well­ established agencies do not have large numbers of private­sector savvy staff. Both Korea and Japan have consistently had the highest
  15. 15. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 15/21 amount of tenured competition staff over the past few years, but only three percent or less of their attorneys have worked in the private sector for a notable period of time. Overall, a majority of the enforcers reporting to GCR said less than one­tenth of their staff has significant private practice experience. Table 9: Highest levels of attrition Authority No. of staff who left Per cent of NAC staff who left Russia 514 29 Brazil 32 27 Ireland 6 27 Pakistan 4 27 Chile 17 23 New Zealand 18 22 India 20 19 Lithuania 8 19 Finland 9 18 Latvia 7 18 US (FTC) 54 17 Mexico 36 16 France 19 14.1 Israel 14 14 DG Comp 62 13 Portugal 7 13 US (DOJ) 66 12.2 Canada 25 12 Japan 84 11.3 Sweden 14 11 Turkey 15 10 UK 22 10 Australia 28 9 Denmark 8 9 Greece 5 9 Korea 36 9 Norway 6 8 Poland 10 8
  16. 16. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 16/21 Colombia 7 7.2 Spain 8 7 Austria 2 6 Belgium 2 6 Czech Republic 3 5 Singapore 2 5 Romania 7 4 Germany 4 3 Switzerland 2 3 Italy 2 2.1 Netherlands 4 0.7 Due partly to the sheer size of the staff, Russia always has the highest rate of attrition in our survey. This year it also topped the table for the proportion of non­administrative competition staff to depart, relative to total staff. The move from second to first came not because attrition at Russia’s Federal Antimonopoly Service has worsened – it actually fell by 1% – but because the authority that had the highest percentage of leavers in 2014 improved significantly. After a year in which nearly a third of competition enforcers quit Chile’s National Economic Prosecutor’s Office, the agency in 2015 reduced its level of attrition to 23%. Admittedly, at a smaller authority such as the FNE, a few people can make a big difference: the number of staff departing the agency dropped from 23 in 2014 to 17 in 2015, but it brought Chile from first to fifth. Given that relatively minor changes in staff can appear to make an outsized difference at smaller agencies, one should be cautious about reading too much into the 27% attrition rates at Pakistan’s and Ireland’s competition authorities – they lost four and six staffers respectively in 2015. On the other hand, these also are agencies that have suffered destabilisation recently: Ireland, through the merger of its Competition Authority into a dual­role Competition and Consumer Protection Commission; and Pakistan through a year and a half spent
  17. 17. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 17/21 without a chairperson. Mexico’s Federal Economic Competition Commission continues to show ever more success in retaining its well­respected staff. Aziz & Kaye partner Luis Alberto Aziz says the authority offers “really high wages compared to private practice.” The workload at COFECE is lighter than at the telecommunications regulator, he adds. After cutting attrition from 40% in 2013 to 24% in 2014, COFECE brought the rate in 2015 all the way down to 16% – a figure historically more typical of its five­star neighbours to the north. Speaking of the US antitrust agencies, the Federal Trade Commission coincidentally had exactly the same number of departures (54) and percentage (17) in 2015 that it did the year before, but the Department of Justice’s antitrust division’s attrition fell from 18% in 2014 to 12% in 2015. This disparity between the US FTC and US DoJ appears to be part of a multi­year trend: during 2013, the former reported only 22 members of the non­administrative competition staff, or 7%, had left. Table 10: Proportion of enforcers retiring Authority No. retiring No. of staff who left Per cent of NAC who left who retired Belgium 1 2 50 Germany 2 4 50 Italy 1 2 50 Romania 3 7 42.9 Canada 7 25 28 Spain 2 8 25 Finland 2 9 22.2 Norway 1 6 16.7 Sweden 2 14 14.3 US (DOJ) 9 66 13.7 US (FTC) 7 54 13 Denmark 1 8 12.5
  18. 18. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 18/21 Denmark 1 8 12.5 Lithuania 1 8 12.5 Russia 44 514 8.6 Japan 7 84 8.3 Korea 3 36 8.3 France 1 19 5.3 India 1 20 5 Australia 1 28 3.6 DG Comp 1 62 1.6 Austria 0 2 0 Brazil 0 32 0 Chile 0 17 0 Colombia 0 7 0 Czech Republic 0 3 0 Greece 0 5 0 Ireland 0 6 0 Israel 0 14 0 Latvia 0 7 0 Mexico 0 36 0 Netherlands 0 4 0 New Zealand 0 18 0 Pakistan 0 4 0 Poland 0 10 0 Portugal 0 7 0 Singapore 0 2 0 Switzerland 0 2 0 Turkey 0 15 0 UK 0 22 0 Korea’s Fair Trade Commission has seen some of the biggest swings in the direction of those who departed the competition authority. In 2013, 21 of the 36 leavers – 58% – retired, while seven of those leaving remained in the civil service. That meant fewer than a quarter were going into the private sector after their experience at the commission. The next year, fully two­thirds of the departures were put down to retirement. But last year, half of the agency’s 36 departures could potentially go into the private sector with the KFTC
  19. 19. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 19/21 on their résumé. The shift has come even as the average age of non­ administrative competition staff has crept up, from 41 in 2013 to 45 in 2015. Jae Hwan Lee, a partner at Shin & Kim, notes that an ethics law bars senior civil servants for three years from working in the private sector in a field related to their government service; junior officials are barred for only one year. “Therefore, some want to go private before being promoted to senior positions, and that may contribute to exodus of junior or middle­level civil servants from the government,” Lee says. “This trend seems to be remarkable as it is relatively easier for the government employees in the KFTC to find appropriate private positions.” He and Bae Kim & Lee partner Seong Un Yun both note that the commission’s January 2013 relocation from Seoul to Se­ Jong City may have led to an exodus from the agency that year. Yun adds that private sector demand for the KFTC experts from the private sectors “has grown continuously” at both law firms and large companies. The Directorate­General for Competition at the European Commission remains an agency through which civil servants rotate, as 95% of staff leaving DG Comp in 2015 remained in civil service – nearly the same rate as 2014. The “revolving door” still has not become much of a phenomenon on that side of the Atlantic. Then again, civil service also appears to have become more attractive even in the US, where between 2014 and 2015, the FTC went from 9% to 14% of leavers staying in government, and the DoJ from 17 to nearly 23%. At the latter agency, one could say the example is set at the top: assistant attorney general Bill Baer left the antitrust division in April 2016 to become acting associate attorney general, the third highest­ranking official at the department.
  20. 20. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 20/21 Table 11: Proportion of enforcers remaining in civil service Authority No. remain in civil service No. of staff who left Per cent of leavers remaining in civil service DG Comp 59 62 95.2 Japan 70 84 83.3 Spain 6 8 75 Ireland 4 6 66 Greece 3 5 60 Austria 1 2 50 Belgium 1 2 50 Italy 1 2 50 Singapore 1 2 50 Sweden 7 14 50 Finland 4 9 44.4 France 8 19 42.1 Korea 14 36 38.9 Czech Republic 1 3 33.3 Norway 2 6 33.3 Netherlands 1 4 25 US (DOJ) 15 66 22.7 Australia 6 28 21.4 Brazil 6 32 18.8 Portugal 1 7 14.3 US (FTC) 7 54 13 Lithuania 1 8 12.5 Poland 1 10 10 Israel 1 14 7.1 Russia 29 514 5.6 UK 1 22 4.6 Chile 0 17 0 Denmark 0 8 0 Germany 0 4 0 India 0 20 0 Latvia 0 7 0 Romania 0 7 0 Switzerland 0 2 0
  21. 21. 27.07.2016 Analysis: Part 1 ­ GCR ­ Global Competition Review http://globalcompetitionreview.com/surveys/article/41402/analysis­part­1 21/21 Copyright © 2016 Law Business Research Ltd. All rights reserved. | http://www.lbresearch.com 87 Lancaster Road, London, W11 1QQ, UK | Tel: +44 207 908 1188 / Fax: +44 207 229 6910 http://www.globcompetitionreview.com | editorial@globalcompetitionreview.com

×