August 2010 sector update
100 years ago…
The last 25 years…….. BBC The standalone school computer 1985 Adapted from Becta 2004 The  computer room  1990s   A potent...
The last decade…
<ul><li>Then </li></ul><ul><li>Pen </li></ul><ul><li>Chalkboard/ Whiteboard </li></ul><ul><li>Banda </li></ul><ul><li>Gest...
<ul><li>Then </li></ul><ul><li>Pen </li></ul><ul><li>Chalkboard/ Whiteboard </li></ul><ul><li>Banda </li></ul><ul><li>Gest...
<ul><ul><li>Online world now integral to students’ lives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing evidence that learning in o...
Current situation  <ul><ul><li>Vast majority of schools are now on broadband </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speeds range betwe...
Barriers <ul><ul><li>Fragmented ICT approach has resulted in a variety of network architectures - to connect these (eg pot...
The Government’s commitment <ul><ul><li>97%   NZ  schools  (99.7% of students) will have  access to   UFB   (100megabits/s...
How - urban?  <ul><li>MED responsible overall for fibre rollout </li></ul><ul><li>Urban areas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>61% of...
How – rural ?  <ul><li>Rural areas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>39% schools (25% population) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Separate ...
Issues around roll out <ul><ul><li>Education is a priority area….however…to make it happen requires a “whole of community ...
www.broadbandmap.govt.nz Telecom fibre-optic  network
Issues around roll out <ul><ul><li>Rollout likely to happen within geographic areas  </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local fibr...
<ul><li>Christchurch City: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>150 km of existing fibre </li>...
What is the Ministry of Education doing? <ul><li>We’re helping prepare schools for the rollout in the following areas: </l...
School ICT infrastructure –  what’s happening and who is paying?
Cost of ultra-fast broadband  (interim policy pending LFC/RBI announcements) <ul><li>Access to ultra-fast broadband involv...
Cost of ultra-fast broadband  (interim policy pending LFC/RBI announcements ) <ul><li>2. Network access charges * </li></u...
Fibre in street (MED/CFH) “ Last mile” connection (MED/CFH) School network (MoE) “ Fibre Drop”  (MoE) MED/MoE – who pays f...
Why wait for the roll out? <ul><li>Prices for fibre and network access charges will be more competitive through Government...
School Network Upgrade Project (SNUP) <ul><ul><li>Provides subsidised upgrades to internal data and electrical cabling inf...
… . this is what bad cabling jobs look like!
What SNUP includes <ul><ul><li>Audit + network design + tendering + project management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Certifie...
What SNUP doesn’t include <ul><ul><li>A new server (unless there is no existing server) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Desktop...
SNUP – criteria for selection <ul><ul><li>To be selected, schools must register interest (by emailing  [email_address] ) <...
Hardware and software provision
TELA  <ul><ul><li>Provides laptops to Principals and teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>86% uptake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul...
SMS/LMS/MLEs <ul><ul><li>New initiative to fund a parent portal or a LMS that supports parental access </li></ul></ul><ul>...
Building school capability
ICT Professional Development <ul><ul><li>Programme running since 1999 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>$11.2 million investment ...
ICT PD – the challenge <ul><ul><li>How do we move from 15% so that all schools benefit from UFB opportunities? </li></ul><...
Where to next?   <ul><ul><li>With a completely  clean  slate… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>what support do you think schools...
Some ideas…. <ul><ul><li>Roadmap:  Where are we now? (self-review). Where are we going to? (case-studies). How do we get t...
NEN Trial Extension
What do we mean by a NEN? <ul><ul><li>Dedicated network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides access to education and admini...
NEN potential benefits <ul><li>For teachers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improved access to content and technology environments ...
NEN – potential benefits <ul><ul><li>For students: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access to greater variety of learning opport...
NEN trial extension - background   <ul><ul><li>Original trial in 2008 involved 23 schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2009:...
NEN trial extension - objectives <ul><li>Identify technical, financial and practical issues involved in: </li></ul><ul><ul...
NEN trial extension – content and services  <ul><ul><li>Te Kete Ipurangi and sub-sites (Digistore, NZC etc) </li></ul></ul...
NEN trial - KAREN resources 13
Ongoing dialogue opportunities <ul><li>online survey  </li></ul><ul><ul><li>will be released late August/early September <...
minedu.govt.nz /ufbinschools med.govt.nz/ crownfibre.govt.nz
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Learning without Limits seminar.final

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This presentation has been prepared by Douglas Harre and Marg McLeod for the Learning without Limits ultra-fast broadband seminars - currently being held around the country (August 2010).

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  • ICT is a key enabler of education in the 21 st century ICT use in education will be pervasive ICT key driver in modern economy across all sectors Our students, teachers and wider community need to be engaged Global impact of Internet technologies greatest since invention of the printing press in 14 something
  • Illustrating the way in which technology has impacted education Key thing is transition from analogue to digital
  • Check with asttle team
  • &lt; 20% East Cape and Northland students have access to internet at home compared with &gt;98% on the North Shore (last census).
  • Note Telecom zoning issues around schools Zone 1 and 2 (UFB schools…..towns with &gt;500 lines and therefore have cabinetisation project underway) Zone 3 ab …RBI will kick into these zones…these will be the last parts to get FTTN Zone 4 – Remote schools – 100 or so…..generally small and far from fibre (currently). Primary target for RSBI Remote MAY be easier
  • Douglas to get maps
  • Note Telecom zoning issues around schools Zone 1 and 2 (UFB schools…..towns with &gt;500 lines and therefore have cabinetisation project underway) Zone 3 ab …RBI will kick into these zones…these will be the last parts to get FTTN Zone 4 – Remote schools – 100 or so…..generally small and far from fibre (currently). Primary target for RSBI
  • These are the areas we are going to cover for you today
  • This needs clarity!! Post BC.
  • Make it clear that the internal network upgrade is an important part of being able to utilise fibre. Talk about the total cost of getting access. Fibre Access charges Cost of upgrading your network to deal with that.
  • ICT PD programme has been very influential – early promise of an e-learning transformation and connected school system has remained largely unrealised as yet – while other countries have invested heavily in a more coherent approach in terms of infrastructure, NZ has got much right in terms of a focus on change and pedagogy and networked people – the grass roots. Underlying principles Principles that underpin the development of the ICT PD programme model are: Collaboration and sharing of practice and are critical components of effective professional learning. Teachers’ competence and confidence in ICT is critical in preparing students to participate successfully in the 21st century society and workforce. Integrating ICT in the education system (via appropriate and relevant government and sector initiatives) can transform the way teachers teach and students learn by opening access to a wider range of learning opportunities for more students. ICTs will assist teachers and schools to undertake the required administrative processes more efficiently and effectively. School leaders are best placed to make decisions about how to meet their school’s PD requirements. WITH SUPPORT
  • Underlying principles Principles that underpin the development of the ICT PD programme model are: Collaboration and sharing of practice are critical components of effective professional learning. Teachers’ competence and confidence in ICT is critical in preparing students to participate successfully in the 21st century society and workforce. Integrating ICT into the education system (via appropriate and relevant government and sector initiatives) can transform the way teachers teach and students learn by opening access to a wider range of learning opportunities for more students. ICTs will assist teachers and schools to undertake the required administrative processes more efficiently and effectively. School leaders are best placed to make decisions about how to meet their school’s PD requirements. WITH SUPPORT
  • Check on who is connected and get their logos – UN/KN etc.
  • Learning without Limits seminar.final

    1. 1. August 2010 sector update
    2. 2. 100 years ago…
    3. 3. The last 25 years…….. BBC The standalone school computer 1985 Adapted from Becta 2004 The computer room 1990s A potential education network 2010-2016 The school network 1995-2010
    4. 4. The last decade…
    5. 5. <ul><li>Then </li></ul><ul><li>Pen </li></ul><ul><li>Chalkboard/ Whiteboard </li></ul><ul><li>Banda </li></ul><ul><li>Gestetner </li></ul><ul><li>16mm projector </li></ul><ul><li>Slide shows </li></ul><ul><li>Telephone </li></ul><ul><li>Fax </li></ul><ul><li>Library </li></ul>Now Next? <ul><li>Txting/Pxting </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs/Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Pod/Vod-casting </li></ul><ul><li>Data projector </li></ul><ul><li>LMS/e-portfolios </li></ul><ul><li>IM/SMS </li></ul><ul><li>Digital cameras </li></ul><ul><li>iMovie </li></ul><ul><li>Google </li></ul><ul><li>Peer2peer networks </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual reality </li></ul><ul><li>Wearable computers </li></ul><ul><li>Ubiquitous identity </li></ul><ul><li>Voice recognition </li></ul><ul><li>Agents and avatars </li></ul><ul><li>Visualisation </li></ul><ul><li>Miniaturisation </li></ul><ul><li>Reusable paper </li></ul><ul><li>Semantic web </li></ul><ul><li>PLEs </li></ul>1980/90s Teaching and learning tools
    6. 6. <ul><li>Then </li></ul><ul><li>Pen </li></ul><ul><li>Chalkboard/ Whiteboard </li></ul><ul><li>Banda </li></ul><ul><li>Gestetner </li></ul><ul><li>16mm projector </li></ul><ul><li>Slide shows </li></ul><ul><li>Telephone </li></ul><ul><li>Fax </li></ul><ul><li>Library </li></ul>Now Next? <ul><li>Txting/Pxting </li></ul><ul><li>Blogs/Wikis </li></ul><ul><li>Pod/Vod-casting </li></ul><ul><li>Data projector </li></ul><ul><li>LMS </li></ul><ul><li>IM/SMS </li></ul><ul><li>Digital cameras </li></ul><ul><li>iMovie </li></ul><ul><li>Google </li></ul><ul><li>Peer2peer networks </li></ul><ul><li>Virtual reality </li></ul><ul><li>Wearable computers </li></ul><ul><li>Ubiquitous identity </li></ul><ul><li>Voice recognition </li></ul><ul><li>Agents and avitars </li></ul><ul><li>Visualisation </li></ul><ul><li>Miniaturisation </li></ul><ul><li>Reusable paper </li></ul><ul><li>Semantic web </li></ul><ul><li>PLEs </li></ul>1980/90s Teaching and learning tools Analogue Digital Connected Ubiquitous
    7. 7. <ul><ul><li>Online world now integral to students’ lives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Increasing evidence that learning in online environments can significantly enhance engagement + lift achievement . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Particularly effective for students who don’t respond to traditional teaching methods. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Students can collaborate and learn anytime, anywhere and from anyone . </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>In other words – learning without limits </li></ul></ul>Why UFB in schools?
    8. 8. Current situation <ul><ul><li>Vast majority of schools are now on broadband </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Speeds range between 0.5-5Mbps – inadequate for many online services to work properly </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>C urrently < 200 New Zealand schools have bandwidth required for streaming video, web conferencing, apps such as Google Earth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Next generation of applications will assume high speed, symmetrical (i.e. fast in both directions) internet connections </li></ul></ul>
    9. 9. Barriers <ul><ul><li>Fragmented ICT approach has resulted in a variety of network architectures - to connect these (eg potential NEN) presents challenges </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schools purchase individually – limits opportunity to centralise procurement and reduce cost </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Few schools have industry-level service (funding and geographic reasons) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Digital divide issue </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Limited opportunities for remote support/provision of off-site support </li></ul></ul>
    10. 10. The Government’s commitment <ul><ul><li>97% NZ schools (99.7% of students) will have access to UFB (100megabits/second) by 2016 (Crown Fibre Holdings) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>3% remote schools will have access to fast broadband (10Mbps) by other means eg.satellite or point-to-point wireless </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>$150 million investment signalled to prepare schools for the rollout </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>$1.5 billion investment overall </li></ul></ul>
    11. 11. How - urban? <ul><li>MED responsible overall for fibre rollout </li></ul><ul><li>Urban areas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>61% of schools (but 75% general pop.) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Crown Fibre Holdings (CFH) set up to manage the $1.35 billion ‘UFB Initiative’. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Selection of private sector partners currently underway – announcements in October </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fibre deployments planned to begin by end of 2010/early 2011. </li></ul></ul>
    12. 12. How – rural ? <ul><li>Rural areas </li></ul><ul><ul><li>39% schools (25% population) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Separate $300 million Rural Broadband Initiative (RBI) overseen directly by MED (not CFH) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>RFPs being released end of August </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Deployment also due to begin before end of 2010/early 2011. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Certainty will only emerge later this year - </li></ul></ul>
    13. 13. Issues around roll out <ul><ul><li>Education is a priority area….however…to make it happen requires a “whole of community approach” </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local councils need to be involved </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Wider community demand improves chances of getting fibre sooner </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Health, business and homes targets also </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Areas with lower cost of laying fibre / higher return on investment likely to be higher priority for fibre providers </li></ul></ul>
    14. 14. www.broadbandmap.govt.nz Telecom fibre-optic network
    15. 15. Issues around roll out <ul><ul><li>Rollout likely to happen within geographic areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Local fibre companies lay “dark fibre” only – services will come later (think roads/cars) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>How the rollout happens depends on government’s choice of infrastructure provider (national or regional) </li></ul></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>Christchurch City: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Enable Networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>150 km of existing fibre </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Over 325 km within the City by 2012 </li></ul></ul>Infrastructure at the local level
    17. 17. What is the Ministry of Education doing? <ul><li>We’re helping prepare schools for the rollout in the following areas: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Upgrading infrastructure/internal networks(SNUP and fibre in schools) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hardware and software initiatives </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Building capability </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Investigating centralised provision of content and services (NEN Trial Extension) </li></ul></ul>
    18. 18. School ICT infrastructure – what’s happening and who is paying?
    19. 19. Cost of ultra-fast broadband (interim policy pending LFC/RBI announcements) <ul><li>Access to ultra-fast broadband involves a number of cost components </li></ul><ul><li>Fibre drop </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One-off cost for fibre that connects your school to the fibre in the street </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cost varies by provider, depends on distance from road, terrain etc </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Typical drop cost =$10-20K (based on current pricing) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MoE pays 80/68% of this to the fibre provider (not to you) … </li></ul></ul>
    20. 20. Cost of ultra-fast broadband (interim policy pending LFC/RBI announcements ) <ul><li>2. Network access charges * </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ongoing cost for basic access to fibre - paid to your fibre provider (likely to be more than cost of broadband over copper - greater speed and bandwidth) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>3. Services * </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Any other services that you sign up for e.g. ISP/offsite backup/hosted LMS </li></ul></ul>* Not currently MoE subsidised
    21. 21. Fibre in street (MED/CFH) “ Last mile” connection (MED/CFH) School network (MoE) “ Fibre Drop” (MoE) MED/MoE – who pays for what?
    22. 22. Why wait for the roll out? <ul><li>Prices for fibre and network access charges will be more competitive through Government’s procurement negotiations – a good reason to wait! </li></ul><ul><li>Suggest any contracts you sign should not exceed 24 months </li></ul><ul><li>Govt decision-making is underway – further announcements re next stage anticipated in next 6-8 weeks. </li></ul>
    23. 23. School Network Upgrade Project (SNUP) <ul><ul><li>Provides subsidised upgrades to internal data and electrical cabling infrastructure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>473 schools have been upgraded since 2006 ($18m) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>100 more schools underway ($22m) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>80 % costs for state /68% for state integrated funded by MoE </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Further 239 announced by Minister to start in Sept/Oct ($48m) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>By end of 2011 approx 1/3 of schools will have been upgraded </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Significant investment in making schools fibre-ready over six years </li></ul>
    24. 24. … . this is what bad cabling jobs look like!
    25. 25. What SNUP includes <ul><ul><li>Audit + network design + tendering + project management </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Certified data and electrical cabling installation with a 20-25-year warranty </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2 additional power outlets at each data outlet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Gigabit Ethernet switching with a 5 year, next-day replacement warranty </li></ul></ul>
    26. 26. What SNUP doesn’t include <ul><ul><li>A new server (unless there is no existing server) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Desktop or laptop computers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fibre drop costs </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ultra-fast broadband – it just makes your network ultra-fast broadband ready! </li></ul></ul>
    27. 27. SNUP – criteria for selection <ul><ul><li>To be selected, schools must register interest (by emailing [email_address] ) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Priority given to: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>rural secondary schools </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>area schools </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>schooling improvement schools </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Te Kotahitanga schools </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ICT PD clusters </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>schools on satellite broadband </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>schools already on fibre </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>active E-asTTle schools </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>VLN e-learning clusters </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>ultra-fast broadband clusters (fibre loops) </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>NOT “I have a really bad network” </li></ul></ul></ul>
    28. 28. Hardware and software provision
    29. 29. TELA <ul><ul><li>Provides laptops to Principals and teachers </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>86% uptake </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Windows 7 and Microsoft Office 2010 will be deployed on TELA machines from 11 October </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schools will need to supply licence activation keys before laptops go to school </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Schools must be enrolled in the Microsoft NZ School agreement to access the licence keys </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Further details on http://faq.tela.co.nz </li></ul></ul>
    30. 30. SMS/LMS/MLEs <ul><ul><li>New initiative to fund a parent portal or a LMS that supports parental access </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Designed to improve student attendance & engagement </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For users of eTAP, MUSAC Classic, KAMAR or PCSchool </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Connects to eTAP portal, Ultranet, Moodle or KnowledgeNet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>minedu.govt.nz/goto/mle for further info </li></ul></ul>
    31. 31. Building school capability
    32. 32. ICT Professional Development <ul><ul><li>Programme running since 1999 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>$11.2 million investment annually </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>65% of schools have participated in programme </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>15% of schools participate at any one time </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>101 clusters including 12 regional clusters currently </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>New models for sector capability that reflect the changing environment being developed </li></ul></ul>
    33. 33. ICT PD – the challenge <ul><ul><li>How do we move from 15% so that all schools benefit from UFB opportunities? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>making full use of the infrastructure and tools available </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>modifying schools’ traditional organisational approaches </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>integrating ICT into effective teacher practice </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ensuring all professional learning providers understand learning in ICT-rich environments </li></ul></ul>
    34. 34. Where to next? <ul><ul><li>With a completely clean slate… </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>what support do you think schools will need? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>what could that look like? </li></ul></ul>
    35. 35. Some ideas…. <ul><ul><li>Roadmap: Where are we now? (self-review). Where are we going to? (case-studies). How do we get there? (resources, services) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collaboration: regionally and nationally </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Spreading the word: student, teacher and principal mentors </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Beyond e-Learning : raise the e-capability of facilitators (e.g. Support Services providers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Efficiency: Targeting available resources to need </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Informing: e-learning practice should inform research & answer specific questions on student learning outcomes </li></ul></ul>
    36. 36. NEN Trial Extension
    37. 37. What do we mean by a NEN? <ul><ul><li>Dedicated network </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Provides access to education and administration-related content and services via high speed internet </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Shared ICT service management and infrastructure creates economies of scale </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Allows schools to access content and services that they might not be able to afford individually </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Many examples globally – eg. nen.gov.uk </li></ul></ul>
    38. 38. NEN potential benefits <ul><li>For teachers: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improved access to content and technology environments which enhance students’ learning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Opportunities to share and learn in local, national and international communities of practice </li></ul></ul><ul><li>For Principals and Boards </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Improved standard of technology and service delivery </li></ul></ul><ul><li>For IT Managers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Freed up to support teachers and students more directly </li></ul></ul>
    39. 39. NEN – potential benefits <ul><ul><li>For students: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Access to greater variety of learning opportunities - online portfolios, learning resources, discussion forums </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can engage and collaborate with local, national and international learning communities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can create, author and publish in appropriate contexts </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>For parents: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Greater transparency of curriculum, learning assessment and reporting. </li></ul></ul>
    40. 40. NEN trial extension - background <ul><ul><li>Original trial in 2008 involved 23 schools </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>2009: approval given to extend trial to up to 200 schools and until June 2011 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Participating schools must have been on open-access fibre by June 30 2010 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>MoE is contracting REANNZ to connect NEN trial schools to their existing research network - KAREN </li></ul></ul>
    41. 41. NEN trial extension - objectives <ul><li>Identify technical, financial and practical issues involved in: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>extending the trial to a larger number of schools that are already working in a range of collaborative models </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>connecting new content and service providers to the trial version of the NEN </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Identify potential benefits for schools in relation to learning, teaching and administration practices </li></ul>
    42. 42. NEN trial extension – content and services <ul><ul><li>Te Kete Ipurangi and sub-sites (Digistore, NZC etc) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Virtual Learning Network (Moodle, LAMS, Elgg, Mahara servers) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adobe Connect Web Conferencing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Video Conferencing (Std and HD) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Learning Management Systems (3) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>ePortfolio (myportfolio.school.nz) </li></ul></ul>
    43. 43. NEN trial - KAREN resources 13
    44. 44. Ongoing dialogue opportunities <ul><li>online survey </li></ul><ul><ul><li>will be released late August/early September </li></ul></ul><ul><li>focus groups </li></ul><ul><ul><li>on particular topics will be held October/November </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Will revolve around the issues discussed today and will influence future development </li></ul><ul><li>All responses gratefully accepted! </li></ul><ul><li>We will email you to remind you </li></ul>
    45. 45. minedu.govt.nz /ufbinschools med.govt.nz/ crownfibre.govt.nz

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