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How to Apply for Fellowships Powerpoint Presentation - June 2010

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How to Apply for Fellowships Powerpoint Presentation - June 2010

  1. 1. How to Apply For Fellowships Becky Blankenburg, MD, MPH Associate Program Director, Advising and Career Development June 9, 2010
  2. 2. Special Thanks • Special thanks to our panelists, who are here to provide their personal experience, wisdom, and advice on how to best apply to and select fellowship programs. • And to the Chief Residents for helping arrange this career development series.
  3. 3. Panel of Soon-To-Be Fellows, Fellows, and Fellowship Directors Soon-to-be-Fellows: • Claudia Algaze, MD (Soon-to-be Cardiology Fellow) • Alisa VanCleave, MD (Soon-to-be PICU Fellow) Fellows: • Ritu Chitkara, MD (NICU Fellow) • Sejal Shah, MD (Endo Fellow) Fellowship Directors and Attendings: • Hayley Gans, MD (ID Fellowship Director) • Lou Halamek, MD (NICU Fellowship Director) • John Mark, MD (Pulmonology Fellowship Director) • Arun Rangaswami, MD (Heme/Onc Fellowship Director) Other Wise People Who Will Be Helpful in Your Application Process: • Lynn Kahana, MD (PICU) • Laura Bachrach, MD (Endo)
  4. 4. Longitudinal Plan for Subspecialty Fellowship Preparation How to decide Applying/ Thinking about Applying Assuring success Interns & Medical Students Juniors Seniors
  5. 5. ACGME Accredited Pediatric Specialties (2007-2008) # Programs # Positions Filled Adolescent 26 63 Anesthesiology 45 142 Cardiology 49 305 Child Abuse Critical Care 62 358 Dev/Behav 33 76 Emergency Med 46 261 Endocrinology 68 215 Gastroenterology 51 209 Heme/Onc 64 352
  6. 6. ACGME Accredited Pediatric Specialties (2007-2008) continued # Programs # Positions Filled Infectious Disease 61 162 Nephrology 36 105 Neurology 67 251 Pulmonology 47 120 Rehabilitation 11 9 Rheumatology 26 64 Sports Medicine 8 11
  7. 7. ACGME Accredited Non-Pediatric Specialties (2007-2008) # Programs # Positions Filled Allergy & Immun 71 303 Dermatology 109 1077 Genetics 48 90 Preventative Med 73 346 Toxicology 4 11
  8. 8. Other Pediatric Fellowships • Academic General Pediatrics • Pediatrics Hospital Medicine • Robert Wood Johnson • CDC-EIS (Epidemiologic Intelligence Service) • Alternative Medicine • Environmental Health • Palliative Care • Pain Management
  9. 9. How to Identify Career Goals • Particular passion • Specific areas of interest • Intellectual Content of the subspecialty – Variety of medical problems, ages, exotic vs. common • Subspecialty vs. primary care • Predominantly inpatient vs. outpatient • Chronic vs. acute • Continuity of care vs. short-term • Procedures • Deaths and bad news
  10. 10. How to Identify Career Goals continued • Academic vs. community setting • Clinical Work, Clinical Research, Laboratory Research, Education, Advocacy, Policy • Hours of work – Daytime vs. nighttime – On-service time vs. shifts • Ability to work part-time • Costs: Time on-service, geography, lifestyle • Variety of Practice Opportunities (that is, are you able to tailor what you would like to do?)
  11. 11. Exposure to Subspecialties • Electives and Selectives • Away rotations • Division meetings • Attend subspecialty clinics during quieter months • Subspecialty conferences • Informational interviews
  12. 12. Identify Mentors • Associate Program Directors, Advising and Career Development – Laura Bachrach, MD and Becky Blankenburg, MD, MPH • Assigned Advisor • Fellowship Director at LPCH • Faculty in your division of interest – At LPCH – Elsewhere • Fellows in your division of interest – At LPCH – Elsewhere – LPCH Residency Graduates • Current LPCH Residents
  13. 13. LPCH Fellowship Directors Adolescent Medicine Neville Golden Allergy and Immunology Kari Nadeau Cardiology Jeff Feinstein Critical Care David Cornfield, Cristina Alvira Developmental and Behavioral Peds Heidi Feldman Endocrinology Darrel Wilson, Tandy Aye Gastroenterology John Kerner General Pediatrics Fernando Mendoza Genetics (Residency Program) Greg Enns, Jon Bernstein Heme/Onc Arun Rangaswami ID Hayley Gans Neonatology Lou Halamek Nephrology Paul Grimm Pulmonology John Mark Rheumatology Tzeilan Lee
  14. 14. Find Out About Programs: How to Get Information on Programs • Look on the web: – ACGME Website: www.acgme.org – NRMP Website: http://www.nrmp.org/fellow – Check subspecialty websites • E.g., American Thoracic Society for pulmonary – Individual Program Websites • Email/call programs for more information • Talk with advisor, fellowship director, other attendings and fellows in the division • Consider arranging an away rotation at the institution you are interested in
  15. 15. Find Out About Programs: Figuring Out Where to Apply • Think carefully about what you want to get out of fellowship – What type of clinical training – What kind of research/scholarly product you want to complete – What you want to do long-term – Possibilities for advanced training (MPH?, MSEd?, etc) – Where the mentors are who fit what you are looking for • Meet with advisor, fellowship director, and other attendings and fellows in the division to see what programs they recommend to you
  16. 16. Special Note About When To Do Fellowship • It’s ok to take a year off (or even two or three) before fellowship… – Think about what is best for your personal situation – Good to take time if you don’t yet know what to go into…better to be sure of your decision – Fellowship directors understand this
  17. 17. General Timeline • Varies greatly from subspecialty to subspecialty. • Check with LPCH fellowship director for more details. • Some fellowships are part of a national match (timeline follows): – Peds Cardiology – Peds Critical Care (PICU) – Peds Emergency Medicine – Peds Gastroenterology – Peds Hematology/Oncology – Neonatology (NICU) – Peds Nephrology – Peds Pulmonology – Peds Rheumatology – Primary Care Sports Medicine • Be aware that each of these subspecialties has some programs that are not participating in the match (so each of these subspecialties has some match and some non-match processes).
  18. 18. Fellowship Program Match Begins Rank List Due Match Day Fellowship Start Date Allergy/Immunology 1/6/10 5/5/10 5/19/10 July 2011 Peds Cardiology Peds GI Peds Nephrology Peds Pulmonology 1/20/10 5/19/10 6/2/10 July 2011 Neonatology 5/12/10 9/15/10 9/29/10 July 2011 Genetics 7/28/10 11/17/10 12/1/10 July 2011 Dev/Behav Peds Peds Critical Care Peds ED Peds Rheum 8/11/10 11/17/10 12/1/10 July 2011 Primary Care Sports Medicine 9/1/10 12/15/10 1/5/11 July 2011 Peds Heme/Onc 11/18/09 4/21/10 5/5/10 July 2011 NRMP Match Programs Timeline
  19. 19. Non-Match Specialties General Timeline: When to Start Applying • Peds ID – Fall 1¾ years before starting (i.e., Fall of second year for starting right after residency) • Other non-match specialties: – Fall 1¾ years before starting to Fall ¾ year before starting (i.e., Fall of second year to Fall of third year for starting right after residency) • Sooner the better • Definitely check with the fellowship directors as these timelines are moving targets
  20. 20. How to Apply to Programs • For Match Specialties: – Look at the NRMP Website: http://www.nrmp.org/fellow – Some use the ERAS applications – Some still have their own applications • For Non-match Specialties: – Look at the program websites – Write/Email/Call Programs for information and applications – Brief cover letter – Puts you on the radar screen – Sooner the better
  21. 21. What is in an Application? • ERAS Demographic/Informational Section – Or if a non-match specialty, then a cover letter • CV • Personal Statement • Letters of Recommendation – Usually 3-4 total • 1 from your residency program leadership (from the Program Director or an Associate Program Director; most fellowships want this) • 1-2 from Subspecialty/Area that you are applying in • 0-1 from an attending in another subspecialty or general pediatrics • 1 from your research mentor (if you have one) – The best letters usually come from people who know you well – When asking for a letter, ask “Can you provide a strong letter in support of my application?” – Ask for the letters early – Dean’s Letter/MPSE (from medical school) – Transcripts –
  22. 22. What is in an Application? • ERAS Demographic/Informational Section – Or if a non-match specialty, then a cover letter • CV • Personal Statement • Letters of Recommendation – Usually 3-4 total • 1 from your residency program leadership (from the Program Director or an Associate Program Director; most fellowships want this) • 1-2 from Subspecialty/Area that you are applying in • 0-1 from an attending in another subspecialty or general pediatrics • 1 from your research mentor (if you have one) – The best letters usually come from people who know you well – When asking for a letter, ask “Can you provide a strong letter in support of my application?” – Ask for the letters early – Dean’s Letter/MPSE (from medical school) – Transcripts – Plug: Come to our session on how to write cover letters and CVs in the Fall
  23. 23. Interviews: Scheduling • Most interviews are offered, not requested – But if you haven’t heard from a program or will be in the area anyway, it is ok to contact the program and ask • Be persistent (but nice and appreciative) in scheduling an interview • Try to cluster interviews – Because the timing of interviews at some programs may overlap with offers from other programs • Sooner the better
  24. 24. Interviews: Preparation • Learn about the programs you are going to visit • Why do you want to attend that program? • Why would you be a good fit? • What type of research and with whom would you want to work? • Read up on the particular research or clinical interest of faculty you may be meeting
  25. 25. Comparing Programs: Things to think about in preparing for and on actual interview day • Priorities of the Program, Fellowship Director, and Division Chief – Career advancement of fellows – Clinical needs of division- are there adequate faculty and support staff? – Research needs of division- are there adequate faculty and support staff? – Other needs of division (eg., teaching) – Recent or impending changes (retirements, sabbaticals, leaves of absence etc)
  26. 26. Comparing Programs: Things to think about in preparing for and on actual interview day continued • Quality of Mentorship – Quality of clinical training – Quality of research training, opportunities, and facilities • May include being able to earn Masters Degree – Success with getting fellowship grants – Duties and ancillary services (advice nurses, clinical NPs) – Satisfaction of current and prior fellows – Post-fellowship placement of fellows
  27. 27. Comparing Programs: Things to think about in preparing for and on actual interview day continued • Funding – Are they NIH training grant supported or not? – Who provides the funding for your fellowship? – Do you have to apply for grants during fellowship? – Is there a safety net in case you apply for a grant but are unsuccessful?
  28. 28. Interviews: Actual Day • You are the consumer – make sure the fellowship will be a good fit • Ask the right questions of the right people, but make sure your questions are answered – Fellows and administrative staff may be most appropriate to ask re: logistics, salary, call, etc. – Talk with faculty and fellows about research opportunities, opportunities for pursuing advanced degrees during fellowship, etc. • Make sure to ask the obvious questions: – Office space – Administrative support – Meals when on call – Computers, courses, meetings, book allowance – Home vs. in house call
  29. 29. Post-Interview • Thank you notes/emails – There was a lot of discussion on the panel last year about how necessary this is – Recommend: thank you note/email to the fellowship director – Only need to send thank you notes/emails to others if you had particularly strong connection
  30. 30. Offers • Match (like residency match) • Non-Match (like med school offers) – Don’t be pressured into making a hasty decision – Don’t leave programs hanging too long – Remember: you’re the consumer • Contracts
  31. 31. •The NRMP Match was created to allow program directors and applicants to consider all their options before making final commitments, and to establish a uniform date and time for the announcement of residency position appointments. •After completing their respective evaluations, programs and applicants each prepare a final listing of their choices in preference order, which are then used by the Match to place applicants into residency positions. •The success of the Match depends on a high level of trust among all participants in the Matching Program. What is the NRMP Match?
  32. 32. What is a "Match Violation"? The NRMP has established principles and policies to guide participants (programs and applicants) through the Match application and rank ordering process. Match violations negatively affect all participants in the Match. Consequences can result in: •An applicant being pressured by a program director to reveal the program's place on the applicant's rank order list. •A program director being notified that a matched applicant will be a "no show" and finding that no other suitable candidates are available. •An applicant being pressured by (or pressuring) a program director to sign a contract before Match Day. •A matched applicant who could have matched to a more preferred program because that program now has an open position because another applicant was a "no show". Match Violation
  33. 33. Success as a Fellow Good Mentorship!!!
  34. 34. Success as a Fellow • Most important: Good Mentorship – Through your research advisor – Through your fellowship director • Scholarship Oversight Committee • Individual Development Plan (IDP) – Distribution of Areas of Effort: • Research/Other Scholarly Activity • Patient Care • Professional Self-Development • Education (Teaching Activities) • Administration • Other Professional Accomplishments
  35. 35. Advice for Medical Students • Start to identify career goals • Take electives during your clinical years • Start to identify mentors • Choose a residency that exposes you to a variety of subspecialties – i.e., leave your doors open
  36. 36. Advice for Interns • Start to identify career goals • Start to think about subspecialties • Start to identify mentors • Meet with mentors • Request particular electives/rotations for junior year • Arrange away electives for junior year • Consider attending academic pediatric and subspecialty conferences – Pediatric Academic Societies Meeting (May 2011, Denver, CO) – Other subspecialty conferences
  37. 37. Advice for Juniors/Seniors • Solidify commitment to fellowship and subspecialty • Start to think about training goals • Research programs • Write for applications • Arrange interviews • Interview • Weigh options • Choose a program • If possible and necessary, arrange your senior schedule so you have time to move to fellowship
  38. 38. Panel Questions for the Panel: • Introduce yourself • Briefly summarize your training/practice to date (where, why?) • Anything surprising about applying to or doing fellowship • Any advice

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