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  • advocacy work - Candy visiting detainees in jail after immigration raid, writing letters to state re unfair anti-immigrant practices in westchester; participation in health fairs
     
     - culturally competent clinical services - advising the westchester hospital before it opened on needed services for Latino community in its area, designing med-peds well child checks for Latino families as group visits (in the works), working with Every Child Succeeed local home visit/early intervention program to improve placement of infants delivered at University Hospital in medical home with agency support for moms to support their parenting skills
  • advocacy work - Candy visiting detainees in jail after immigration raid, writing letters to state re unfair anti-immigrant practices in westchester; participation in health fairs
     
  • community-based collaborative research: breastfeeding project, Harmony Garden photovoice qualitative study on teen girsl views of health and family; AMIS partnership with local school that has high immigrant families to support their creation of Todos Padres Unidos parent association with opportunity to provide programming they need on health education and also study them collaboratively in terms of culture and health
  • health professions education: placing interdisciplinary primary care residents in community health centers serving high proportions of Latino patients and supporting their clinnical experiences with small group learning sessions on Latino health, impact of poverty on health, health literacy and strategies to achieve health equity
  • health professions education: placing interdisciplinary primary care residents in community health centers serving high proportions of Latino patients and supporting their clinnical experiences with small group learning sessions on Latino health, impact of poverty on health, health literacy and strategies to achieve health equity
  • So typically, when we think of at risk populations we think of minorities…
  • And perhaps of the elderly….But are they the only at risk populations? Why?? Due to isolation perhaps… some are in nursing homes or even those living with family or independent may feel isolated since their friends may have died or maybe they feel there is a gap of generations with their younger children working long hours etc.
  • My original intent when I developed the concept of the program was to concentrate on Hispanics. However, health care disparities affect all of us. I believe that no one is immune to our broken health care system. I also believe that we can indeed fix it, but it will take a lot of time, passion, patience and collaborative effort
    The problem with today’s economy is that we are seeing more and more families with children at shelters
  • OK, so they are homeless… How does that affect the health care system??? Well let’s assume for a minute that the man in the middle of he pictures comes in to the hospital and get’s diagnosed with leukemia in the high risk or intermidiate risk cathegory, therefore will like to do consolidation with a transplant. So, we do induction treatment, he spend 1 month or 2 in the hospital post induction, then we send him home???? While still pancytopenic, maybe he needs home IV antibiotics, neupogen….with the idea to have him come back for consolodation….hum?!
  • I am going to let you read for a minute this definition. Why are persons of low literacy at risk populations or persons of abuse , persecution or persons in isolation….???
  • Today’s health care system can be a sea of confusion and a source of overwhelming frustration for both the health care providers and the patients and families facing a diagnosis of cancer. Through programs like this one, I hope to provide the audience information regarding the available community resources to help lower income individuals. This program intended to educate learners on the appropriate screening, diagnosis, and treatment for the most common types of cancer. Through out the program multiple speakers discussed and explained the common signs and symptoms of the most common cancers and appropriate screening tests. In addition, we identified health care disparities among culturally diverse populations in the greater Cincinnati area, discussed the underlying factors that contribute to health care disparities and examined opportunities to eliminate them.
    We had a mixed audience including health care providers and public. The program reviewed the impact of health disparities on outcomes and cancer for the at risk populations, including cancers of the lung, prostate, cervix, colon, and breast.
  • For our first all day conference, we limited the number of participants.
  • Click Here for Power Point Slides

    1. 1. WORKSHOP B.2 HEALTH PROFESSIONS EDUCATION – Hispanic Health Model Curricula: Tools to Increase, Improve and Facilitate a More Culturally Competent Health Care Workforce Margie Gerena Lewis, MD Assistant Professor of Internal Medicine Division of Hematology/Oncology University of Cincinnati Founding Member, Latino Health Collaborative of Greater Cincinnati Member, Initiative on Poverty, Justice, and Health March 26, 2010
    2. 2. Mission Statement The Latino Health Collaborative of Greater Cincinnati is a diverse group of individuals from academic and community sites united in partnership to improve the health of the Latino community in the Greater Cincinnati area.
    3. 3. Mission Statement We work together in research using community-based collaborative methods; in education using service learning; in direct service using culturally competent approaches to health promotions and clinical care delivery and in advocacy on a local and regional scale.
    4. 4. Mission Statement It is our goal to develop, implement and evaluate projects that improve the health of the local Latino community, based on needs identified by community leaders and members. ● As Academic Partners, we seek to study the impact of these interventions and share our findings with a broader community and our learners through scholarship. ● As Community Partners, we seek to communicate the health status and needs of our local Latino community and to participate in project work and advocacy to improve health. ● As a Collaborative, we recognize the value of diversity of background and perspectives and welcome the addition of new partners and ideas to our work.
    5. 5. FOUNDING MEMBERSFOUNDING MEMBERS • Tiffany Diers, MD ( Internal Medicine) • Margie Gerena Lewis, MD (Hematology/Oncology) • Lisa Vaughn, PhD (Psychology) • Joan Murdock PhD (Health Administration) • Candy Ireton, MD (Family Medicine) • Liliana Rojas-Guyler PhD (Health Education) • Vanessa Nino MS (Interpreting Services) • Denise Britigan PhD (Health Education) • Ligia Gomez MS (Psychology) • Radha Reddy,MD (ObGYN)
    6. 6.  Community outreach activities since 2007 in the Greater Cincinnati area for Hispanics/at-risk populations: 1. Workshop presenter: “ Conferencia--Educarse para Superarse y Celebración Hispana: Educate to Elevate Conference and Hispanic Celebration”. Duke Energy Center, Cincinnati, Ohio. October 13, 2007 (Presentation done in Spanish) 2. Social Work Oncology Group of Greater Cincinnati (SWOG) Half-day Worshop: “Death and Dying: A Hispanic Perspective”. May 16, 2009 3. Cancer and Cancer Prevention for At-Risk Populations: Who Provides the Care? Program Director and speaker. September 19, 2009
    7. 7. OBJECTIVESUnidos Para Una Mejor Salud Como sacar mas provecho de sus visitas con su doctor Funded by Latino Health Collaborative of Greater Cincinnati Cooperativa para la Salud Latina de La Gran Cincinnati
    8. 8. BREAST FEEDING PROJECT by Ligia Gomez,MS ¿Quiere participar en un estudio sobre dar pecho? ¿Puede recibir una tarjeta de Kroger de $30 solamente por responPuede participar si: Es nacida en un país Hispano Es mayor de 18 años Está embarazada ó tiene un bebé menor de 2 meses.der unas preguntas?
    9. 9. Funded by Latino Health Collaborative of Greater Cincinnati Cooperativa para la Salud Latina de La Gran Cincinnati May 19, 2009 Death and Dying A Hispanic Perspective
    10. 10. CANCER AND CANCER PREVENTION FOR AT RISK POPULATIONS: WHO PROVIDES THE CARE September 19, 2009 Keynote Speaker: Lovell Jones, MD Director Center for Research and Minority Health MD Anderson Cancer Center Sponsored by University of Cincinnati
    11. 11. OBJECTIVES Discuss underlying factors and determinants that contribute to health disparities Examine opportunities for eliminating health disparities.
    12. 12. Minorities
    13. 13. http://thesituationist.wordpress.com/2009/06/19/taking-advantage-of-the-elderly Elderly
    14. 14. Pic from http://acfya.com) posted by LA's Homeless Blog at 8:52 AM 0 Comments Wednesday, March 11, 2009 1 in 50 American Children Experience Homelessness What’s wrong with these pictures? Homeless in America, photograph by Tipper Gore. (Image courtesy of the National Archives and Records Administration http://ocw.mit.edu/OcwWeb/Urban-Studies- and-Planning/11-421Spring- 2005/CourseHome/
    15. 15. At Risk Populations
    16. 16. Define At Risk Populations “We define Populations at Risk broadly, including but not limited to the poor, frail, disabled, economically disadvantaged, homeless, racial and ethnic minorities, persons with low literacy, victims of abuse or persecution, and persons with social risk factors such as isolation”
    17. 17. Improvement of healthcare delivery to at risk populations  Conferences: 1. Help our health care work force become culturally competent. 2. Provide the public with baseline knowledge about cancer and cancer prevention. 3. Provide information regarding the available community resources to help lower income individuals.
    18. 18. CANCER AND CANCER PREVENTION FOR AT RISK POPULATIONS: WHO PROVIDES THE CARE  Mixed audience including health care providers and public. The program reviewed the impact of health disparities on outcomes and cancer for the at risk populations, including cancers of the lung, prostate, cervix, colon, and breast.
    19. 19. At Risk Populations We had a total of 66 participants including: * 32 physicians (11 internal medicine, primary care physicians, family medicine and oncology related) * 14 nurses * 17 Ancillary (included exhibitors who attended the sessions) * 3 patients.
    20. 20. Recommendations To Advance Hispanic Health:  Education, education, education! Less than 3% of the US physicians are Latinos. For those of us who had the unique opportunity to make it through the process, we need to go back to our community and educate them and our children. After all they are our future.  We need to have a culture change and make health care a priority, not a privilege.  Smoking Prevention: Tobacco smoking has caused 100 million deaths worldwide over the past century. Lung cancer is the single most preventable form of cancer. We know that 85% of lung cancer is caused by smoking. Yet 28.4% of high school students are users of any tobacco product in the USA. http://progressreport.cancer.gov/highlights.asp
    21. 21. Recommendations To Advance Hispanic Health:  Infection Control: In third world countries, infections play a major role in cancer rates. For example, cervical cancer affects more than 500,000 women worldwide and causes more than 200,000 deaths per year. Eighty percent of the cases occur in developing countries.  Lifestyle modifications: such as including exercise as part of our daily routine, increasing fruits and vegetables in our diet, no sunbathing, routine sun protection, and weight loss programs.
    22. 22. Recommendations To Advance Hispanic Health:  Cancer screening for currently accepted forms of screening: Breast cancer Screening, Cervical Cancer Screening, and Colon Cancer Screening. Prostate Cancer Screening remains controversial, but accepted by many.  Finally but not least, increase awareness and knowledge in our communities about clinical, translational and basic research efforts in order to advance science and to learn on how to provide equal, quality care for all.

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