Abc's of behavior ppt

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  • Facilitator Script: Hypotheses are “if-then” statements. They describe the relationships that the team believes exist between observable environmental events and students’ behavior. Hypotheses should be based on repeated observations of predictable relationships. Keep in mind that a single example is not sufficient for generating hypotheses regarding function. We will be talking a lot more about this. Assessments should lead to a general understanding of what observable events predict a given behavior. Tips: Click once to see each prompt on the blank line. !This slide contains an Animation!
  • Facilitator Script: Hypotheses are “if-then” statements. They describe the relationships that the team believes exist between observable environmental events and students’ behavior. Hypotheses should be based on repeated observations of predictable relationships. Keep in mind that a single example is not sufficient for generating hypotheses regarding function. We will be talking a lot more about this. Assessments should lead to a general understanding of what observable events predict a given behavior. Tips: Click once to see each prompt on the blank line. !This slide contains an Animation!
  • !This slide contains an Animation!
  • Abc's of behavior ppt

    1. 1. ABC’s of Behavior Renée M. Terrasi, PhD., BCBA-D Dr. Terrasi 2010
    2. 2. Why Do People Behave? Modeling? Accident? Instinct? Condition?? Why Do People Continue Behaving? IT WORKS! Dr. Terrasi 2010
    3. 3. Understanding Chronic Misbehavior <ul><li>If a student repeatedly engages in a problem behavior , he/she is most likely doing it for a reason, because it is paying off for the student </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The behavior is Functional or serves a purpose </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Behavior is a form of communication , unfortunately some students learn that Problem Behavior is the best way for them to get their needs met </li></ul>Dr. Terrasi 2010
    4. 4. Understanding Chronic Misbehavior <ul><li>Recognize that recurring misbehavior occurs for a reason, and take this into account when determining how to respond to misbehavior. </li></ul><ul><li>We can understand how to intervene most effectively with a student by identifying the function (or purpose) of their behavior </li></ul>Dr. Terrasi 2010
    5. 5. ERASE problem behavior E xplain - What is the problem? R eason - What is he/she getting out of it or avoiding? (What is the Function/Pay off of the Behavior?) A ppropriate - What do you want him/her to do instead? S upport - How can you help this happen more often? E valuate - How will you know if it works? Dr. Terrasi 2010
    6. 6. ABC’s of Understanding Chronic Behavior Patterns <ul><li>What happens before (A or antecedent) the behavior occurs ? What is the trigger? </li></ul><ul><li>What is the behavior (B)? </li></ul><ul><li>What happens after (C or outCome/ Consequence) the behavior occurs? What is the outCome ? </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>A  B  C </li></ul></ul></ul>Dr. Terrasi 2010
    7. 7. Summary Statement <ul><li>Based on several observations </li></ul><ul><li>Identifies predictable relationships between environmental variables and behavior </li></ul><ul><li>During </li></ul><ul><li>When </li></ul><ul><li>student will </li></ul><ul><li>because </li></ul><ul><li>therefore the function of the behavior is to access /escape/avoid </li></ul><ul><li>(choose one) </li></ul>(some A ntecedent condition occurs) (engage in a specific B ehavior ) (a predictable out C ome will occur) (something in the environment) (some routine) Dr. Terrasi 2010
    8. 8. Summary Statement <ul><li>Based on several observations </li></ul><ul><li>Identifies predictable relationships between environmental variables and behavior </li></ul><ul><li>During </li></ul><ul><li>When </li></ul><ul><li>student will </li></ul><ul><li>because </li></ul><ul><li>therefore the function of the behavior is to access /escape/avoid </li></ul><ul><li>(choose one) </li></ul>(some A ntecedent condition occurs) (engage in a specific B ehavior ) (a predictable out C ome will occur) (something in the environment) (some routine) Science or Social Studies asked to read out loud in class Verbally refuses, disrespects teacher his teacher calls on someone else oral reading Dr. Terrasi 2010
    9. 9. ABC & Learning: An example Dr. Terrasi 2010
    10. 10. Learning & A  B  C What did the student learn? Dr. Terrasi 2010 A B C Student is asked to do a math problem in front of the class
    11. 11. Learning & A  B  C What did the student learn? Dr. Terrasi 2010 A B C Student is asked to do a math problem in front of the class Student tries to do the problem at the board, but struggles
    12. 12. Learning & A  B  C What did the student learn? Bad OutCome for Student Dr. Terrasi 2010 A B C Student is asked to do a math problem in front of the class by Mr. Brown Student tries to do the problem at the board, but struggles Peers laugh at student and one says aloud, “that one is so easy”
    13. 13. Student w/ Problem Behavior <ul><li> A  B  C </li></ul><ul><li>Jimi has Learned that: </li></ul><ul><li>When (A) asked to do a difficult math problem on the board in front of his class by his math teacher, if he </li></ul><ul><li>(B)ehavior , tries his best and can’t do the problem </li></ul><ul><li>The out(C)ome is: he gets made fun of by his peers, called stupid and laughed at </li></ul><ul><li>Negative OutCome (Punisher) = DECREASE of Desired Behavior in that situation in the future </li></ul>Dr. Terrasi 2010
    14. 14. Learning & A  B  C Student: -Hits peer -Calls teacher name or -Disrupts Teacher calls on someone else & sends student to office TASK & Failure AVOIDED!!! Dr. Terrasi 2010 A B C Student is asked to do a math problem in front of the class Student tries to do the problem at the board, but struggles Peers laugh at student and one says aloud, “that one is so easy” Punishing Consequence NEXT DAY Student is asked to do a math problem in front of the class What happens today???
    15. 15. Student w/ Problem Behavior <ul><li> A  B  C </li></ul><ul><li>Jimi has Learned through repeated experiences, that when (A) asked to do math problems (dbl digit multiplication or division) at his desk or on the board in front of his class, if he (B) , calls the teacher names, refuses work or throws his paper on the ground, the out (C) ome is he gets sent to the back of the room and avoids the difficult math problem & embarrassment of failing in front of his peers. </li></ul><ul><li>*Function = Problem Behavior helps Student AVOID task. </li></ul>Dr. Terrasi 2010
    16. 16. What is the Pay Off? <ul><li>We need to understand behavior from the student perspective… </li></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the student gaining (or trying to get) from engaging in this behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What is the most important thing that the student is gaining or avoiding by using this behavior </li></ul></ul>Dr. Terrasi 2010
    17. 17. Behavior is Functional, Not GOOD or BAD <ul><li>Functional = it pays off for the student in some way… so they do it again </li></ul><ul><ul><li>We may see the behavior as being “good” or “bad”, but the student does it because it is effective, it pays off for them </li></ul></ul>Dr. Terrasi 2010
    18. 18. Let’s pretend you have been observing a kindergartner named Brenda for several days. You have seen Brenda hit or push peers four times. Based on the data/observations you have formulated these ABC statements for each of those observations. ABC Practice Dr. Terrasi 2010
    19. 19. BRENDA HITS OTHER STUDENTS - WHY WOULD SHE DO THIS? Antecedents Behavior Consequences ABC Practice Dr. Terrasi 2010 Susan calls Brenda a “creep face” and laughs at her Brenda punches Susan on the arm Susan stops laughing and walks away A group of students at recess call Brenda fat Brenda kicks several of them The students run away Brenda spells a word incorrectly during an oral review and the child behind her laughs Brenda pulls the child’s hair Brenda is sent to the office Brenda is playing blocks with Ben. Ben takes a block from Brenda Brenda hits Ben over the head with another block Ben puts the block down and runs away
    20. 20. Summary Statement WHEN ANTECEDENT , BEHAVIOR BECAUSE CONSEQUENCE Summary Statement WHEN Peers call Brenda names or tease her , Brenda hits BECAUSE peers go away ABC Practice Therefore the function of the behavior is (access/escape) (choose one) Therefore the function of the behavior is escape Dr. Terrasi 2010
    21. 21. <ul><li>*If you look at the ABC’s of a specific Behavior you will better understand the FUNCTION or PAY OFF of that behavior for the student . </li></ul><ul><li>Stop and Think : </li></ul><ul><li>What is the child really trying to communicate by his/her behavior? </li></ul><ul><li>What does the teacher think is the consequence? vs. What the child sees as the real consequence?(gained or avoided what?) </li></ul><ul><li>What can we do to decrease/change the behavior? How can we help? </li></ul>Dr. Terrasi 2010
    22. 22. Functions of Behavior Dr. Terrasi 2010

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