Technology Resource Teachers’ (TRT) Role in Teacher Professional Development 2007 VASCD Research Grant Recipients Teresa C...
Collaboration <ul><li>Educates approximately 26,500 students.  </li></ul><ul><li>Seventeen elementary, eight middle, and f...
Project This project was introduced to increase the use of  coaching  and job-embedded professional development within the...
Participants In this project, Technology Resource Teachers (n=24) participated in a Coaching Academy and provided subseque...
Workshops Conducted by the Virginia Staff Development Council (VSDC) and based on the National Staff Development Council’s...
Roles for TRT Coaches  <ul><li>resource provider,  </li></ul><ul><li>mentor, </li></ul><ul><li>data coach, </li></ul><ul><...
Workshops Four days of intensive workshop training were provided during the school year to TRTs.
Learning Community In addition to workshop training, an online community was created and maintained in Moodle for resource...
Premise of Coaching Coaching Professional Development prepares TRTs to utilize the coaching framework to effectively suppo...
Increase in Practice In a 2004 study by the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning, instructional coaching w...
Support and Practice The Univ. of Kansas study indicated that without support and follow-up, teacher implementation of new...
Collegiality Coaching as a professional development activity involves a highly skilled professional (the coach) working wi...
Growth Coaching promotes teacher growth and problem solving It is on-going, classroom based, and personalized for each tea...
Consistent Support Coaching should provide consistent support to teachers as they work to improve practice based on collab...
Job Embedded PD Coaching represents sound, job-embedded professional development that has the potential to improve instruc...
Support and Skilled <ul><li>For coaching to be successful, two factors are important and necessary:  </li></ul><ul><ul><ul...
Sophisticated Skills Effective coaching requires a sophisticated set of skills  The processes a coach uses when working wi...
<ul><li>Excellent communication and interpersonal skills </li></ul><ul><li>A passion for teaching and learning </li></ul><...
Teacher Survey Surveys were administered to teachers before and after training to determine if TRTs were implementing coac...
Forty Teachers <ul><li>Forty participating teachers were surveyed </li></ul><ul><li>61 % percent of the teachers  taught s...
Teacher Interest In terms of their self-admitted use of technology in the classroom, almost half of the teachers indicated...
TRTs  The model itself was shown to be beneficial for TRTs to learn the different roles of coaching to create balance in t...
Academy - Improvements Through the coaching and job-embedded professional development activities, teacher instructional st...
Community of Practice In preparing TRTs to take on the role of coach, a community of practice was developed through the Ac...
Teacher Comfort Increased As a result of this training and coaching effort, teachers in schools throughout Stafford County...
Teachers More Receptive The direct impact is enhanced student learning and engagement in the classroom = Students more rec...
TRT Reflections “ Before the academy, I was unsure of my duties. I now have a focused view of what I should be doing in th...
TRT Reflections “ Teaching teachers is challenging. This academy has helped me overcome feeling timid about sharing with t...
TRT Reflections “ The Coaching Academy has given me direction as to how I can become a more effective teacher. Before it w...
TRT Reflections “ My third grade teachers were excited when they saw what their students could actually do with technology...
TRT Reflections “ During the first session with principals, I was highly complemented by my administrator when she acknowl...
Teacher Reflection “ I would like to enhance the interest and learning of my students with the use of technology. I feel a...
Conclusions <ul><li>This project provides common understanding of coaching as a means of professional development </li></u...
Contact Information <ul><li>Teresa Coffman , Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Education at the University of Mary Washin...
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Technology Resource Teachers’ (Trt) Role

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Coaching and Technology Resource Teachers

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Technology Resource Teachers’ (Trt) Role

  1. 1. Technology Resource Teachers’ (TRT) Role in Teacher Professional Development 2007 VASCD Research Grant Recipients Teresa Coffman, Ph.D. Patricia Wiedel, Ph.D. and, Lisa Rollins
  2. 2. Collaboration <ul><li>Educates approximately 26,500 students. </li></ul><ul><li>Seventeen elementary, eight middle, and five high schools </li></ul><ul><li>One technology resource teacher in each school. </li></ul><ul><li>Co-educational, public institution located in Fredericksburg, VA </li></ul>
  3. 3. Project This project was introduced to increase the use of coaching and job-embedded professional development within the Stafford County Technology Resource Teachers (TRTs) program
  4. 4. Participants In this project, Technology Resource Teachers (n=24) participated in a Coaching Academy and provided subsequent one-on-one coaching and training for 40 teachers throughout Stafford County
  5. 5. Workshops Conducted by the Virginia Staff Development Council (VSDC) and based on the National Staff Development Council’s (NSDC) Coaching Model This model was used to provide TRT development and understanding of their roles as coaches within the school and their overall responsibility as technology leaders
  6. 6. Roles for TRT Coaches <ul><li>resource provider, </li></ul><ul><li>mentor, </li></ul><ul><li>data coach, </li></ul><ul><li>curriculum specialist, </li></ul><ul><li>instructional specialist, </li></ul><ul><li>classroom supporter, </li></ul><ul><li>learning facilitator, </li></ul><ul><li>school leader, </li></ul><ul><li>catalyst for change, and </li></ul><ul><li>learner (Killion & Harrison, p. 28, 2006). </li></ul>
  7. 7. Workshops Four days of intensive workshop training were provided during the school year to TRTs.
  8. 8. Learning Community In addition to workshop training, an online community was created and maintained in Moodle for resources, discussions, and assignments. TRTs posted reflections, answered specific questions on practice and implementation, and received support from other TRTs.
  9. 9. Premise of Coaching Coaching Professional Development prepares TRTs to utilize the coaching framework to effectively support teachers; thus, improving student achievement and enhancing the instructional practices of teachers   
  10. 10. Increase in Practice In a 2004 study by the University of Kansas Center for Research on Learning, instructional coaching was found to significantly increase the implementation rate of newly learned practices.
  11. 11. Support and Practice The Univ. of Kansas study indicated that without support and follow-up, teacher implementation of new instructional methods is about 10%, but with coaching the percentage increases to 85% (Knight, 2004).
  12. 12. Collegiality Coaching as a professional development activity involves a highly skilled professional (the coach) working with other professionals (the teachers) in a collegial manner to raise instructional practice to the highest level possible
  13. 13. Growth Coaching promotes teacher growth and problem solving It is on-going, classroom based, and personalized for each teacher
  14. 14. Consistent Support Coaching should provide consistent support to teachers as they work to improve practice based on collaboration, inquiry, and consultative feedback from the coach
  15. 15. Job Embedded PD Coaching represents sound, job-embedded professional development that has the potential to improve instructional practice, and ultimately student achievement
  16. 16. Support and Skilled <ul><li>For coaching to be successful, two factors are important and necessary: </li></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Coaches need to be highly skilled, & </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>They need administrative support </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>According to Jim Knight (2004) from the Univ. of Kansas, Center for Research on Learning, when either one or both of these conditions are missing, the effectiveness of the coaching effort is minimized </li></ul>
  17. 17. Sophisticated Skills Effective coaching requires a sophisticated set of skills The processes a coach uses when working with teachers is just as important as the knowledge a coach brings to the learning experiences
  18. 18. <ul><li>Excellent communication and interpersonal skills </li></ul><ul><li>A passion for teaching and learning </li></ul><ul><li>Empowerment of others </li></ul><ul><li>Flexibility </li></ul><ul><li>Respectfulness of all individuals with whom they are working and, </li></ul><ul><li>Strong organizational abilities </li></ul><ul><li>(Characteristics of Effective Coaches) </li></ul>Needed Attributes
  19. 19. Teacher Survey Surveys were administered to teachers before and after training to determine if TRTs were implementing coaching interventions and skills learned from the workshops
  20. 20. Forty Teachers <ul><li>Forty participating teachers were surveyed </li></ul><ul><li>61 % percent of the teachers taught subjects in Kindergarten through Grade 6 </li></ul><ul><li>13 % taught subjects in Grades 7 and 8, and </li></ul><ul><li>26 % taught in Grades 9 through 12 </li></ul><ul><li>The Teacher Survey focused on the following main topic areas: </li></ul><ul><li>Use of technology in the classroom, </li></ul><ul><li>How teachers’ hope to use technology to impact student learning, and </li></ul><ul><li>The role of the TRT in supporting their classroom </li></ul>
  21. 21. Teacher Interest In terms of their self-admitted use of technology in the classroom, almost half of the teachers indicated that their technology skills were minimal, limited, or not very good, while close to a third of the teachers felt very comfortable incorporating technology into their classrooms After the project, teachers wanted to increase their one-on-one work with the TRT: “ I would like to use technology to engage and inspire my students to learn new skills and to develop existing skills.”
  22. 22. TRTs The model itself was shown to be beneficial for TRTs to learn the different roles of coaching to create balance in their TRT roles at their school and to be better prepared to work with teachers to integrate technology into teaching and learning “ When we analyzed the roles and responsibilities of a coach, it was a great moment because I was really able to look at myself on a floating continuum and see just how much knowledge I already possessed and where I needed the most growth.”
  23. 23. Academy - Improvements Through the coaching and job-embedded professional development activities, teacher instructional strategies and methods as they relate to technology integration were enhanced and improved
  24. 24. Community of Practice In preparing TRTs to take on the role of coach, a community of practice was developed through the Academy allowing TRTs to share ideas, problems, and solutions
  25. 25. Teacher Comfort Increased As a result of this training and coaching effort, teachers in schools throughout Stafford County saw an improvement in their overall knowledge base, comfort level, and instructional practice as it relates to technology integration
  26. 26. Teachers More Receptive The direct impact is enhanced student learning and engagement in the classroom = Students more receptive
  27. 27. TRT Reflections “ Before the academy, I was unsure of my duties. I now have a focused view of what I should be doing in the specific situations that I find myself working. The academy has given a foundation upon which to continue to develop my capacities.”
  28. 28. TRT Reflections “ Teaching teachers is challenging. This academy has helped me overcome feeling timid about sharing with teachers. [As a result of this training,] I feel more confident coming right out and saying, “This is what needs to be done in order to get from point A to point B.” Some of this confidence came through learning how to build relationships and how to motivate the adult learner. Reading responses in Moodle gave me some great ideas.”
  29. 29. TRT Reflections “ The Coaching Academy has given me direction as to how I can become a more effective teacher. Before it was they needed assistance with technology, but now I am able to help integrate technology into “Their” teaching. Now I do the technology with them. It has enabled me to make them comfortable using technology at a higher level with confidence. The strategies included in coaching allow me to help other teachers become better teachers through technology.”
  30. 30. TRT Reflections “ My third grade teachers were excited when they saw what their students could actually do with technology in their lessons. I tried to get this grade level more involved in using technology for two years with no success. I decided to use this grade level in my coaching and saw a big turn-around. Their lessons were more exciting and students were more engaged.”
  31. 31. TRT Reflections “ During the first session with principals, I was highly complemented by my administrator when she acknowledged my abilities as a Technology Resource Teacher. Wow! That was definitely physical evidence of my role as a coach and leader in my school. I am fortunate to work at a school that supports me as a coach and leader.”
  32. 32. Teacher Reflection “ I would like to enhance the interest and learning of my students with the use of technology. I feel as though students learn a lot more when they are presented the information in a number of different ways, and respond well to the use of technology. It gives them the opportunity to become more active participants in their learning and education. I would like to create, and use, lessons that will be presenting the information in a meaningful and interesting way, and engaging my students in their learning. I would like to incorporate at least 2 lessons involving technology for each unit.”
  33. 33. Conclusions <ul><li>This project provides common understanding of coaching as a means of professional development </li></ul><ul><li>It also confirms that if coaches are to be effective in their role, they must be highly qualified as teachers, knowledgeable in content, and skilled in the sophisticated practices of coaching </li></ul><ul><li>Their roles and responsibilities must be clearly defined and strongly focused on the improvement of instruction and student achievement </li></ul><ul><li>Their role must remain supportive and never be confused with the supervisory or evaluative role of the principal </li></ul><ul><li>Administrative support is a critical element to the success of coaching efforts </li></ul><ul><li>As effective facilitators of adult learning, coaches lead teachers in reflective and inquiry-based professional development that advances collective leadership, continuous improvement of instructional practices, and improved student achievement </li></ul>
  34. 34. Contact Information <ul><li>Teresa Coffman , Ph.D. is an Associate Professor of Education at the University of Mary Washington. Email: tcoffman@umw.edu </li></ul><ul><li>Patricia Wiedel , Ph.D. is Director of Professional Learning at Stafford County Schools. Email: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Lisa Rollins is Supervisor of Instructional and Assistive Technology at Stafford County Schools. Email: [email_address] </li></ul>

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