European governments

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European governments

  1. 1. United Kingdom, Germany, & Russia
  2. 2.  Parliament is an essential part of UK politics. Its main roles are: ◦ Examining and challenging the work of the government ◦ Debating and passing all laws (legislation) ◦ Enabling the government to raise taxes
  3. 3.  The business of Parliament takes place in two Houses: ◦ 1. House of Commons ◦ 2. House of Lords
  4. 4.  It is the role of the citizens in the UK to vote & elect the members of the House of Commons. The political party in the House of Commons with the most votes chooses the Prime Minister. The House of Commons is responsible for making laws for the country.
  5. 5. • The House of Lords is the second Chamber of the United Kingdom’s Parliament.• It plays an important part in revising legislation and keeping a check on government by scrutinizing its activities.• The House of Lords has little power.• Most members of the House of Lords are
  6. 6.  1. Prime Minister ◦ This role is the real head of government. He or she is the leader of the Parliament and is the chief executive of the country. 2. Head of State (King or Queen) ◦ This role is only symbolic; the Head of State holds very little political power. Although, the Queen is an important symbol of national unity.
  7. 7.  Like the United States, Germany is a “federal republic” ◦ a national government and state governments share powers. Technically, it’s government is a Federal Parliamentary Representative Democratic Republic…whew!
  8. 8.  1. Chancellor: ◦ This is the real head of government, similar to the Prime Minister of the United Kingdom. ◦ He or she is chosen by Parliament, and is the chief executive of the country. 2. President:• Germany’s president has very little power, and mainly carries out ceremonial duties.
  9. 9. • President Bush welcomes German Chancellor Angela Merkel to the Oval Office • She is the 1st woman (and the first East German) to hold this position
  10. 10.  1. Bundestag (Upper House) ◦ Mainly an advisory council, but must approve laws and amendments ◦ Holds little political power ◦ Representatives are members of the German state governments and are not elected directly by the people 2. Bundesrat (Lower House) ◦ The role of citizens in Germany is to vote for & elect members to this House. ◦ Holds most of Germany’s political power. ◦ Members elect the Chancellor.
  11. 11.  After the fall of the Soviet Union, Russia became a democracy. The role of the citizens is to freely elect the nation’s leaders. Like the United States, Russia is a “federal republic” ◦ the power is divided between national and state governments with a president who leads the nation
  12. 12.  The 1993 constitution created a dual executive branch that consists of a Premier (appointed by president with approval of Duma) and a President, but the president is the dominant figure. The Russian president has more power than an American president - elected by popular vote of the citizens He or she can issue orders that become laws even if they are not passed by the legislature!
  13. 13.  This is the Parliament of the Russian Federation. It consists of two chambers: ◦ 1. The Federation Council ◦ 2. The State Duma
  14. 14.  Russia has seen many changes since the break up of the Soviet Union in 1991. Russians have to learn how to function in a democracy instead of under communism where most decisions were made for them by the government. Government officials need to learn that laws apply to them just like they apply to all of the people.  In the past, the Russian government punished those individuals who criticized their decisions. Now, officials have to learn to accept disagreements over government policies.

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