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Cross-Cultural Training  for EFL Teachers GAIA EDUCATION Global Consulting Group WORKING IN SOUTH KOREA
Training Objectives <ul><li>Identify the main aspects of Korean culture that affect the relationship between teacher and s...
Training Outline APPLICATION IN THE CLASSROOM Group-Oriented Spatial Relationships Body Motion Touching High Context  Comm...
<ul><li>ICEBREAKER </li></ul>
Education in South Korea <ul><li>View of Education </li></ul><ul><li>Greatly Valued </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive </li></u...
Korean Language I want  a   book I  did  my homework  (SVN) My favorite Korean band is FT Island.   They’re really talente...
Korean Language, con’t No, I did my homework No, I want your help Yes, I have a pencil No, I could hear you Yes, I underst...
SURVEY: CLASSROOM SITUATIONS
Cultural Dimension: SOCIAL ORGANIZATION STATUS Friend-to-Friend Subject Parent Elderly Ruler Husband Wife Young Child Kore...
Cultural Dimension: SOCIAL ORGANIZATION, con’t Parent  Husband Wife Child Ruler Subject Elderly Young American Culture: EG...
Application in the Classroom: HIERARCHICAL In Korean Classrooms…. <ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Frontal instructi...
Cultural Dimension: SOCIAL ORIENTATION <ul><li>“ American society is seen as a collection of individuals, and in Korea it’...
Application in the Classroom: GROUP-ORIENTATION In Korean Classrooms…. <ul><li>“ The nail that sticks out gets pounded in”...
Cultural Dimension: VERBAL COMMUNICATION Korean Culture: Indirect Communication American Culture: Direct Communication
Application in the Classroom:  INDIRECT COMMUNICATION In Korean Classrooms…. <ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><li>Won’t spea...
Cultural Dimension:  CONTEXTING  <ul><li>Contexting =  </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal +  NONVERBALS  + History + Environment + S...
NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION Nonverbal Communication Body Motion Facial expressions, eye contact, posture Touching Behavior Bod...
Spatial Relationships Koreans (Same Sex) Koreans (Opposite Sex) Americans
Touching Behavior <ul><li>Hold hands, arm around shoulder  </li></ul><ul><li>No affection in public </li></ul><ul><li>No t...
Touching Behavior <ul><li>Bowing </li></ul><ul><li>Shaking Hands </li></ul><ul><li>Corporeal punishment accepted </li></ul...
Body Motion <ul><li>To beckon, extend arm, palm down and make scratching motion </li></ul><ul><li>Two hands when giving/ac...
Body Motion, con’t <ul><li>Don’t take expressions at ‘face value’ </li></ul><ul><li>Look at context when communicating </l...
DEBRIEFING: CLASSROOM SITUATIONS <ul><li>#1 RUMORS </li></ul><ul><li>You overhear rumors about a group of students who’ve ...
DEBRIEFING: CLASSROOM SITUATIONS <ul><li>Did any aspects of American culture influence your answers?  If so, which aspects...
References <ul><li>Axtell, R.E. (1991).  Gestures: The do’s and taboos of body language around the world.   New York: John...
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Cross Cultural Training For EFL Teachers Working In South Korea

Cross-cultural training module for English as a Foreign Language Teachers.

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Cross Cultural Training For EFL Teachers Working In South Korea

  1. 1. Cross-Cultural Training for EFL Teachers GAIA EDUCATION Global Consulting Group WORKING IN SOUTH KOREA
  2. 2. Training Objectives <ul><li>Identify the main aspects of Korean culture that affect the relationship between teacher and students </li></ul><ul><li>Determine ways in which American culture differs from Korean culture </li></ul><ul><li>Understand how culture influences behaviors that impact classroom dynamics </li></ul><ul><li>Provide practical strategies and skills needed to work with students in Korea </li></ul>
  3. 3. Training Outline APPLICATION IN THE CLASSROOM Group-Oriented Spatial Relationships Body Motion Touching High Context Communication ( Non-Verbal ) Indirect Communication ( Verbal ) Hierarchical Korean Culture
  4. 4. <ul><li>ICEBREAKER </li></ul>
  5. 5. Education in South Korea <ul><li>View of Education </li></ul><ul><li>Greatly Valued </li></ul><ul><li>Competitive </li></ul><ul><li>High Status </li></ul><ul><li>Role of Teachers </li></ul><ul><li>Highly respected </li></ul><ul><ul><li>2 nd to parents </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Role Model </li></ul><ul><li>In the Classroom </li></ul><ul><li>Frontal instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Large class size </li></ul><ul><li>No switching between periods </li></ul><ul><li>English Instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Required </li></ul><ul><li>TOEIC and TOEFL tests </li></ul><ul><li>English = Global Language </li></ul>
  6. 6. Korean Language I want a book I did my homework (SVN) My favorite Korean band is FT Island. They’re really talented. In addition to singing well, they’re also really cute! I want _ book I homework did (SNV) They’re really talented. In addition to singing well, they’re also really cute! My favorite Korean band is FT Island . USE OF ARTICLES (the, an, a) SENTENCE STRUCTURE (Noun, Subject, Verb) ESSAY STRUCTURE English Korean
  7. 7. Korean Language, con’t No, I did my homework No, I want your help Yes, I have a pencil No, I could hear you Yes, I understand QUESTION/ANSWER STRUCTURE Did you not do your homework? Don’t you want my help? Do you have a pencil? Couldn’t you hear me? Do you understand? Teacher Student
  8. 8. SURVEY: CLASSROOM SITUATIONS
  9. 9. Cultural Dimension: SOCIAL ORGANIZATION STATUS Friend-to-Friend Subject Parent Elderly Ruler Husband Wife Young Child Korean Culture: HIERARCHICAL
  10. 10. Cultural Dimension: SOCIAL ORGANIZATION, con’t Parent Husband Wife Child Ruler Subject Elderly Young American Culture: EGALITARIAN
  11. 11. Application in the Classroom: HIERARCHICAL In Korean Classrooms…. <ul><li>Teachers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Frontal instruction vs. Interactive discovery </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Accept inequality </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assume knowledge from authority is absolute </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Use student-based learning </li></ul><ul><li>Say “I don’t know” </li></ul><ul><li>Treat students as equals </li></ul><ul><li>Use lectures & presentations </li></ul><ul><li>Prepare for class </li></ul><ul><li>Establish formal relationships </li></ul>Don’t Do
  12. 12. Cultural Dimension: SOCIAL ORIENTATION <ul><li>“ American society is seen as a collection of individuals, and in Korea it’s a collection of groups” (Kohls,123) </li></ul>American Culture: Individualistic Korean Culture: Group-Oriented
  13. 13. Application in the Classroom: GROUP-ORIENTATION In Korean Classrooms…. <ul><li>“ The nail that sticks out gets pounded in” </li></ul><ul><li>(Asian proverb) </li></ul><ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><li>Won’t necessarily participate </li></ul><ul><li>Are more motivated to learn as a group </li></ul><ul><li>Single out students </li></ul><ul><li>Criticize or praise students publicly </li></ul><ul><li>Assign group work </li></ul><ul><li>Give everyone a chance to speak </li></ul><ul><li>Award & punish groups </li></ul>Don’t Do
  14. 14. Cultural Dimension: VERBAL COMMUNICATION Korean Culture: Indirect Communication American Culture: Direct Communication
  15. 15. Application in the Classroom: INDIRECT COMMUNICATION In Korean Classrooms…. <ul><li>Students </li></ul><ul><li>Won’t speak up if they don’t understand </li></ul><ul><li>Will rarely say “I don’t know” </li></ul><ul><li>May not answer a question if unsure of answer </li></ul><ul><li>Take silence for agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Take ‘yes’ for agreement </li></ul><ul><li>Be upset with ‘white lies’ </li></ul><ul><li>Ask direct questions </li></ul><ul><li>Observe body language and tone of voice </li></ul><ul><li>Allow few seconds for response </li></ul><ul><li>Be cautious not to embarrass students </li></ul><ul><li>  Ask open-ended questions </li></ul><ul><li>Test understanding by asking entire class and observing individual reactions </li></ul>Don’t Do
  16. 16. Cultural Dimension: CONTEXTING <ul><li>Contexting = </li></ul><ul><li>Verbal + NONVERBALS + History + Environment + Situation </li></ul>American Culture: Low Context Korean Culture: High Context
  17. 17. NONVERBAL COMMUNICATION Nonverbal Communication Body Motion Facial expressions, eye contact, posture Touching Behavior Body contact, hitting, greeting Spatial Relationships
  18. 18. Spatial Relationships Koreans (Same Sex) Koreans (Opposite Sex) Americans
  19. 19. Touching Behavior <ul><li>Hold hands, arm around shoulder </li></ul><ul><li>No affection in public </li></ul><ul><li>No touching, gripping or patting on arm, shoulder or back </li></ul>Details <ul><li>Don’t make assumptions about sexual orientation </li></ul><ul><li>Okay to pat students’ head/shoulder </li></ul>Same Sex <ul><li>Maintain distance with students of opposite sex </li></ul>Male & Female Application in the Classroom
  20. 20. Touching Behavior <ul><li>Bowing </li></ul><ul><li>Shaking Hands </li></ul><ul><li>Corporeal punishment accepted </li></ul>General <ul><li>If students bow, just nod </li></ul><ul><li>Can judge respect by depth of bowing </li></ul>Greeting <ul><li>Be aware, but don’t practice </li></ul>Hitting Application in the Classroom
  21. 21. Body Motion <ul><li>To beckon, extend arm, palm down and make scratching motion </li></ul><ul><li>Two hands when giving/accepting something to someone of higher status </li></ul><ul><ul><li>One hand if lower </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Proper posture </li></ul>General <ul><li>Students should give you things with two hands </li></ul><ul><li>Give students things with one hand </li></ul>Hands <ul><li>Reinforce standards of posture </li></ul>Whole Body Application in the Classroom
  22. 22. Body Motion, con’t <ul><li>Don’t take expressions at ‘face value’ </li></ul><ul><li>Look at context when communicating </li></ul><ul><li>Muted </li></ul><ul><li>Smiling and laughter disguise negative emotions </li></ul>Facial Expressions <ul><li>Don’t get offended if students don’t give you eye contact </li></ul><ul><li>Don’t make students look you in the eye </li></ul><ul><li>Indirect </li></ul><ul><li>No staring </li></ul>Eye Behavior General Application in the Classroom
  23. 23. DEBRIEFING: CLASSROOM SITUATIONS <ul><li>#1 RUMORS </li></ul><ul><li>You overhear rumors about a group of students who’ve been helping each other cheat on recent tests. You pull aside one of the suspected students and describe the situation, but hold back from directly accusing him. The entire time you’ve been speaking with him, he’s failed to give you any eye contact. </li></ul><ul><li>#2 FIRST DAY </li></ul><ul><li>It’s your first day of teaching English at a Korean secondary school. You worked all week meticulously planning lessons, and couldn’t sleep from the excitement of meeting your students. After presenting what you thought to be an interesting lecture, you ask the class questions to test their understanding. Nobody raises their hand, and when you call on students individually, they manage to smile but fail to respond. </li></ul><ul><li>#3 SPANKING </li></ul><ul><li>It’s been a month since you’ve started teaching in Korea. You’re feeling more comfortable in your new role and are glad you’re finally starting to understand your students. In between periods, on your way back to class, you pass a classroom in which you see a teacher hitting a student on the behind with a yardstick. </li></ul>
  24. 24. DEBRIEFING: CLASSROOM SITUATIONS <ul><li>Did any aspects of American culture influence your answers? If so, which aspects? </li></ul><ul><li>Would you change any of your answers? </li></ul><ul><li>What steps can you take to make sure your teaching experience in Korea goes smoothly? </li></ul>
  25. 25. References <ul><li>Axtell, R.E. (1991). Gestures: The do’s and taboos of body language around the world. New York: John Wiley & Sons. </li></ul><ul><li>Cook, J. & Rider, J. (2008). On news: The biggest stories of 2007 [Electronic version]. Good Magazine, 9. </li></ul><ul><li>Hesselgrave, D.J. (1991). Communicating Christ cross-culturally: An introduction to missionary communication. Grand Rapids, MI: Zondervan. </li></ul><ul><li>Hur, S.V. & Hur, B.S. (1992). Culture Shock! Korea. Portland: Graphic Arts Center. </li></ul><ul><li>Intercultural business communication (n.d.) Retrieved March 27, 2008, from http://www.kwintessential.co.uk/ </li></ul><ul><li>intercultural-business-communication/tool.php?culture1=52&culture2=44 </li></ul><ul><li>Iowa State University (2008, Februrary 25). Cultural differences. Retrieved April 10, 2008, from http://www.celt.iastate.edu/international/CulturalDifferences3.html </li></ul><ul><li>Kleifgen, J.A. (1988). Learning from student teachers’ cross-cultural communicative failures. Anthropology & Education Quarterly , 19(3), 218-234. </li></ul><ul><li>Kohls, R.L. (2001). Learning to think Korean: A guide to living and working in Korea. Boston: Intercultural Press </li></ul><ul><li>Males, B. (2008). Proxemics. Retrieved April 10, 2008, from http://benjaminmales.com/ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>personal_space/proxemics_small.jpg </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Margaret (n.d.) Trouble in Korea? Retrieved March 27, 2008, from http://www2.ald.net/~roden/ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>korea/pages/cult_f.htm </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Moreau, A.S. (n.d.). Foundations of intercultural communication course documents. Retrieved March 27, 2008, from http://www.wheaton.edu/intr/Moreau/courses/562/documents.htm </li></ul><ul><li>Social life (n.d.) Retrieved March 27, 2008, from http://www.korea.net/korea/ </li></ul><ul><ul><li>kor_loca.asp?code=G0501 </li></ul></ul>

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