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Rhetorical Forms - Basics Ted Leach Kingston High School
Description <ul><li>What’s the purpose of the writing? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Convey information without bias </li></ul></u...
Objective description <ul><li>Technical details </li></ul><ul><li>“Look for the green shutters on the windows.” </li></ul>
Subjective description <ul><li>Sometimes called  emotional  or  impressionistic  writing </li></ul><ul><li>“ Imagine the s...
Checklist for description <ul><li>Subjective  or  objective ; what’s my purpose? </li></ul><ul><li>Dominant   impression :...
Writing notebook <ul><li>Title:  Description in “Through the Tunnel” (9/14) </li></ul><ul><li>Task: Create a double-entry ...
How to do a double-entry <ul><li>Left side of page: quote, drawing, key point </li></ul><ul><li>Right side of page: your t...
Sample double-entry <ul><li>“… the young English boy stopped at a turning of a path and looked down at a wild and rocky ba...
Credits <ul><li>Some slide content adapted from  The Bedford Reader </li></ul>
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Rhetorical Forms

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Rhetorical Forms

  1. 1. Rhetorical Forms - Basics Ted Leach Kingston High School
  2. 2. Description <ul><li>What’s the purpose of the writing? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Convey information without bias </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Convey information with feeling </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Objective vs. subjective description </li></ul>
  3. 3. Objective description <ul><li>Technical details </li></ul><ul><li>“Look for the green shutters on the windows.” </li></ul>
  4. 4. Subjective description <ul><li>Sometimes called emotional or impressionistic writing </li></ul><ul><li>“ Imagine the ship herself, with every pulse and artery of her huge body swollen and bursting…sworn to go on or die” (Dickens, American Notes ) </li></ul><ul><li>What literary techniques does Dickens use? </li></ul>
  5. 5. Checklist for description <ul><li>Subjective or objective ; what’s my purpose? </li></ul><ul><li>Dominant impression : what is my point? </li></ul><ul><li>Point of view and organization : do they work together? Are they clear? </li></ul><ul><li>Details : what is needed to convey my dominant impression? </li></ul><ul><li>Concrete language : have I used sensory details? </li></ul>
  6. 6. Writing notebook <ul><li>Title: Description in “Through the Tunnel” (9/14) </li></ul><ul><li>Task: Create a double-entry journal on the use of description in “Through the Tunnel” </li></ul>
  7. 7. How to do a double-entry <ul><li>Left side of page: quote, drawing, key point </li></ul><ul><li>Right side of page: your thoughts on what that quote, drawing, or point is important. </li></ul>
  8. 8. Sample double-entry <ul><li>“… the young English boy stopped at a turning of a path and looked down at a wild and rocky bay, and then over to the crowded beach he knew so well from other years” (76). </li></ul><ul><li>In the first sentence of the story, Lessing sets up the contrast between the two beaches. The beach attracts Jerry’s attention because it’s wild and rocky -- quite different from the beach the narrator will shortly describe as “safe.” I think it’s interesting that this contrast -- which is so important in the story -- happens in its first sentence. </li></ul>
  9. 9. Credits <ul><li>Some slide content adapted from The Bedford Reader </li></ul>

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