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Instructional Design for Online and Blended Learning Course Slides

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These are the slides for our free course on Udemy at:
https://www.udemy.com/disruptive-innovation-in-higher-education/

You can find the course videos at:
https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLXa3JWoXGD0WFaRBmLZAyhGPII1SGMEaL

Here are how the course will work:
1. The course will start with a template for you to conduct needs analysis and research for your course.
2. You will then design learning outcomes and use our templates to develop a learner-centered syllabus to meet requirements of accreditors and a course introduction.
3. You will then use our Course Blueprint template to build each week of your course. While you do that, you will use the OSCAR course evaluation rubric to evaluate your course for best practices.
4. We will share all we know about how to use the latest technology, videos and screencasts to improve the engagement of your course.
5. For those who come from faith-based institutions, we will provide sections on how to integrate faith into learning in your course. For those who do not come from faith based sections, you can skip this section.
6. You will use the course blueprint you developed to create and publish your course using Canvas.

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Instructional Design for Online and Blended Learning Course Slides

  1. 1. Instructional Design for Online and Blended Learning Introduction Dr. Andrew Sears President, City Vision University www.cityvision.edu Dr. Michael Truong Executive Director Azusa Pacific University www.apu.edu
  2. 2. Course Outcomes In this course, you will complete the design of an online or blended course using best practices through the following steps: 1. Use our template to conduct analysis, research and planning for your course. 2. Design learning outcomes and use our template to design a course introduction and syllabus to meet accreditation standards. 3. Design each week of your course using our course blueprint template and use the OSCAR rubric to evaluate your course for best practices. 4. Design using latest technology, videos and screencasts to improve the engagement of your course. 5. Develop and publish your course in Canvas (or other system) based on the course blueprint you designed. 6. For those who come from Christian institutions, you will apply best practices to integrate a Christian worldview into course design.
  3. 3. Target Audience  Anyone wanting to design an online or blended course.  Students who value pragmatism and cost-effectiveness in education.  Academic leaders needing to add online and blended courses to complement their campus-based offering.  This course is designed to be re-purposed as faculty training for smaller institutions.  A particular focus will be on those teaching in under-resourced contexts such as the majority world or serving disadvantaged populations.  Educational director at NGO or parachurch ministry to develop a combination of an offline and blended program that could be accepted as credit by accredited institutions.  Staff at a nonprofit, Christian ministry, missions agency or church with high quality unaccredited training program wishing to ready it for accreditation and/or an online/blended format.
  4. 4. What Makes this Course Unique 1. This course is designed around constructivist learning philosophy so that you will learn instructional design through building a course. 2. Second, this course will provide very practical creative commons worksheets and templates for you to use and reuse in building your courses. 3. Third, this Udemy course has the exact same materials as the $800 accredited Instructional Design Master’s course provided by City Vision University, and we are giving it away for free. ◦ Students who complete this course in Udemy and want to have their work assessed to get credit through City Vision University can do so paying half-price tuition (only $400).
  5. 5. Course Requirements and Corequisites  Course requirements. It would be helpful to: ◦ Identify a topic that you would want to design a course for to use in the project for this course ◦ Have some experience with teaching or developing courses  This Course Can Be Taken with Our Other Courses Provided for Free on Udemy ◦ Disruptive Innovation in Higher Education ◦ Educational Program Design and Management ◦ Philosophy of Christian Integration ◦ Faith and Learning Integration
  6. 6. Course Outline & Course Project Templates: ADDIE 1. Analysis: Course Design Process, Research and Planning 2. Design: Writing Effective Learning Outcomes 3. Designing the Syllabus and LMS Introduction 4. Designing and Evaluating the Learning Unit for Your Course 5. Designing for Blended Learning Environments 6. Designing with Instructional Technology, OER, Video and Screencasts 7. Developing Your Course in Canvas (or other Learning Management System) 8. Finalizing and Implementing Your Course
  7. 7. How You Can Help  Our goal is to significantly expand access to higher education globally ◦ This is course is largely a volunteer driven project of Christian Higher Education Innovation Alliance (cheia.org), which is a charity-driven collaboration of 100+ leaders to enable the global growth of post-secondary education serving the majority world and the poor.  Ways you can help and participate ◦ Contribute templates, resources and suggestions to improve the course ◦ Spread the word about this course ◦ If interested, join CHEIA’s Google Group ◦ Take our other free courses
  8. 8. Overview of Instructional Design Models Dr. Andrew Sears President, City Vision University www.cityvision.edu Co-Founder CHEIA www.cheia.org
  9. 9. ADDIE Model Image Source: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Skema_ADDIE.jpg Lessons 1-3 Research Template Lessons 2-6 Blueprint Template Lessons 7-8 Canvas YouTube Video on ADDIE Model
  10. 10. Importance of Adaptive Design: Traditional ADDIE (Waterfall) Backward Program Design Audience is Traditional Students Outcomes for Well-Defined Fields Assessments Based on Known Outcomes Instruction with Known Content Available Evaluation Feedback Iteration Is Years
  11. 11. Successive Approximation Model (SAM) Provides a more iterative, lean approach with faster feedback cycles than traditional ADDIE Image Source: https://ilite.wordpress.com/2015/03/11/iterative-e-learning-development-with-sam/ YouTube Video on SAM - Successive Approximation Model
  12. 12. Importance of Adaptive Design: Optimal Design Methodology Changes Based on Environment DESIGN APPROACH PROBLEM: We know what customers want (the field doesn’t change much) SOLUTION: We know how to deliver it (tech & resources don’t change much) Waterfall √ √ Agile √ no Lean Startup no no Source: http://www.slideshare.net/NatalieHollier/lean-strategymeetup-small/
  13. 13. Project Management: Waterfall vs. Agile vs. Lean Design Source: http://www.slideshare.net/NatalieHollier/lean-strategymeetup-small/ (Traditional ADDIE & Assessment Plans)
  14. 14. Lean Startup Process Build MeasureLearn Product (start with MVP) Data Pivot Maximize Loop Iteration Speed Ries, E. (2011). The Lean Startup: How Today’s Entrepreneurs Use Continuous Innovation to Create Radically Successful Businesses (First Edition). Crown Business.
  15. 15. The Challenge: Rapid Growth of Higher Education Globally 100 Million Students in 2000 263 Million Students in 2025 (84% of growth in the developing world) Sources Karaim, R. (2011). Expanding higher education: should every country have a world-class university. CQ Global Researcher, 5(22), 525–572. Lutz, W., & KC, S. K. (2013). Demography and Human Development: Education and Population Projections. UNDP-HDRO Occasional Papers, (2013/04). Retrieved from http://hdr.undp.org/sites/default/files/hdro_1304_lutz_kc.pdf 137 Million New Students in Developing Countries by 2025 4.9 billion middle class globally by 2030
  16. 16. Priorities for Project Management Triangle for Course Design Vary Based on Environment Practical Application/ Adaptive Revision Frequency (time) Cost Quality (scope) Developing Countries Western Countries 1. Fixed Cost Design vs. Fixed Quality Design How does design change if cost must be 1/10th or 1/100th (as in Ethiopia)? 3. Quality and Cultural Contextualization Since the foundation of most materials is for middle-class Western audiences, cultural contextualization is a much larger part of the definition of quality outside of Anglo contexts. 2. More Adaptive Design & Practical Application Cultural minorities with limited resources often face environments with more unknowns than Western educators with a more homogeneous globally dominant culture requiring more adaptive design.
  17. 17. How Do You More than Double Access to Higher Education in 25 years? Design for 4 Interrelated Uncertainties Changing Students Changing Goals Affordable Content Availability Costs Different students based on different goals, content and costs. $1,000 degree vs. $10k degree vs. $100k degree What goals are realistic given the students, costs and content? Different costs, goals and students will present different content options + content & platforms are rapidly changing. Different content availability, goals and students will allow radically different costs.
  18. 18. Analysis: Course Needs, Research and Planning Dr. Andrew Sears President, City Vision University www.cityvision.edu Co-Founder CHEIA www.cheia.org
  19. 19. Course Needs Analysis and Research Process Course Outcomes, Assessment s & Content 1. Org Mission, Objectives, Faculty Input & Program Learning Outcomes 2. Needs of Students & Employers (Advisory Board & Standards) 4. Research Content & Technology Availability: Books, Videos, Articles, OER 3. Research Comparable Course Syllabi, Outcomes, Textbooks & Topics External Stakeholder Needs Internal Stakeholder Needs & Priorities External Capabilities Learning from Field See: Course Needs, Research and Brainstorming Template Google Doc
  20. 20. Hierarchy, Theory of Assessment & Backward Design Mission Institutional Outcomes Program Learning Outcomes (PLO) Degree A Course Learning Outcomes (CLO) Course A Course Learning Outcomes (CLO) Course B Unit Learning Outcomes (ULO) Assessment Assessment Signature (Summative) Assessment Unit Learning Outcomes (ULO) Assessment Assessment Signature (Summative) Assessment Program Learning Outcomes (PLO) Degree B Each Level Needs to: • Fit within the scope of the level above it • Have Outcome Measures to Prove that the Outcomes Above it Were Achieved Proof Content Content Content Content • Backward design means Outcomes first, then assessment, then content
  21. 21. Program Learning Outcomes (PLOs)  Often “Flow” from Institution Level Outcomes (ILO) and/or mission.  Should be clearly defined and measurable.  Should be reasonably attainable.  Include the development of skills, providing job-related training, the imparting on knowledge and information, the training in the application of knowledge and skills and the development of desirable habits and attitudes. Source: Nuts and Bolts of Curriculum Mapping. Presentation at DEAC Fall Workshop October 22, 2018. Dr. Errin Heyman
  22. 22. Course Learning Outcomes (CLOs)  Describe what learners should be able to know or do at the conclusion of a specific course. They include what the learner will not only be able to do, but also how well they can do it and under what conditions  Support the mastery of PLO  Should link up (“map”) to the PLO – and ILO/Mission  Lesson Learning Outcomes build into CLOs Source: Nuts and Bolts of Curriculum Mapping. Presentation at DEAC Fall Workshiop October 22, 2018. Dr. Errin Heyman
  23. 23. Mapping Unit/Lesson Outcomes to Course Outcomes to Program Outcomes  Unit outcomes should be linked to unit assessments  All course outcomes should be linked to assessments  All program outcomes should map to signature assessments Source: Nuts and Bolts of Curriculum Mapping. Presentation at DEAC Fall Workshop October 22, 2018. Dr. Errin Heyman
  24. 24. CLOs to PLOs Curriculum Map Example Source: Nuts and Bolts of Curriculum Mapping. Presentation at DEAC Fall Workshop October 22, 2018. Dr. Errin Heyman
  25. 25. Design: Writing Effective Learning Outcomes and Developing a Course Outline Dr. Michael Truong Executive Director, Office of Innovative Teaching & Technology Azusa Pacific University www.apu.edu
  26. 26. Writing Effective Learning Outcomes  Remember that learning outcomes describe what learners should be able to know or do at the conclusion of a lesson/unit, course, or program.  When writing effective learning outcomes, consider the following: ◦ Identify the concept you want students to learn (e.g., scientific method). ◦ Identify the level of knowledge you want students to attain (e.g., application of scientific method) ◦ Identify the verb that describe the observable behavior you want students to demonstrate (e.g., apply the scientific method) ◦ Identify any additional context or criteria for the learning outcome (e.g., apply the scientific method to the explanation of life in outer space) ◦ Identify the level of student you are developing these learning outcomes for (e.g., first year undergraduate, master’s, doctoral)
  27. 27. Using Bloom’s Taxonomy for Writing Learning Outcomes  Bloom’s Taxonomy is a classification of educational goals.  Intended as a tool for curriculum planning, delivery, and assessment.  There are six different levels, starting with lower order skills like remembering, understanding to higher order skills like evaluating and creating.  Each level of learning has a corresponding set of actionable verbs aimed at assessing student learning.
  28. 28. Bloom’s Taxonomy with Action Words Remember (recall facts and basic concept)  Define  Duplicate  List  Memorize  Repeat  State Understand (explain ideas or concepts)  Classify  Describe  Discuss  Explain  Identify  Locate  Recognize  Report Apply (use information in new situations)  Execute  Implement  Solve  Use  Demonstrate  Interpret  Operate  Schedule Analyze (draw connections among ideas)  Differentiate  Organize  Relate  Compare  Contrast  Distinguish  Examine  Experiment Evaluate (justify a position or decision)  Appraise  Argue  Defend  Judge  Select  Support  Value  Critique Create (produce new or original work)  Design  Assemble  Construct  Conjecture  Develop  Formulate  Author  Investigate
  29. 29. Writing Effective Learning Outcomes Verb Noun Context (optional) The actionable verb corresponding to the different levels of Bloom’s Taxonomy The noun refers to the knowledge, skills, and abilities you want students to learn. The context indicates where, when, or how the outcome will be applied. Example: Identify (verb) the seven steps of the research process (noun) when writing a research paper (context).
  30. 30. Using Bloom’s for Measuring Learning at the Varying Levels Based on story of Goldilocks and Three Bears  Remember: Describe where Goldilocks lived.  Understand: Summarize what the Goldilocks story was about.  Apply: Construct a theory as to why Goldilocks went into the house.  Analyze: Differentiate between how Goldilocks reacted and how you would react in each story event.  Evaluate: Assess whether or not you think this really happened to Goldilocks.  Create: Compose a song, skit, poem, or rap to convey the Goldilocks story in a new form.
  31. 31. Resources for Writing Effective Learning Outcomes
  32. 32. Developing a Coherent Course Outline  A course outline is the structure or organization of learning within a course. Course outlines can be organized in a variety of ways (e.g., chronologically, topically, conceptually, process-oriented, etc.)  When developing a course outline, consider the following: ◦ The length for the course (e.g., 8, 10, or 15 weeks) ◦ The course learning outcomes (e.g., 6 outcomes divided across allotted weeks) ◦ The discipline of the course (e.g., history course are often chronologically organized) ◦ The type of students (e.g., adult learners typically want more time for practice and application) ◦ The type of assessment (e.g., courses with a comprehensive exam at the end should build in formative assessment opportunities to check for progress)
  33. 33. Examples of Course Outlines Organized by Learning Outcomes Week 1 – LO #1 Week 2 – LO #1 Week 3 – LO #2 Week 4 – LO #2 Week 5 – LO #3 Week 6 – LO #3 Week 7 – LO #4 Week 8 – LO #4 Organized by Topics Week 1 – Topic 1 Week 2 – Topic 2 Week 3 – Topic 3 Week 4 – Topic 4 Week 5 – Topic 5 Week 6 – Topic 6 Week 7 – Topic 7 Week 8 – Topic 8 Organized by Chronological Order Week 1 – 14th century Week 2 – 15th century Week 3 – 16th century Week 4 – 17th century Week 5 – 18th century Week 6 – 19th century Week 7 – 20th century Week 8 – 21st century
  34. 34. Design: Academic Faith Integration Dr. Michael Truong Executive Director, Office of Innovative Teaching & Technology Azusa Pacific University www.apu.edu
  35. 35. What is Academic Faith Integration? “Faith integration is informed reflection on and discovery of the relation(s) between the Christian faith within the academic disciplines, professional programs, the arts, and lived practice resulting in the articulation of Christian perspectives on truth and life in order to advance the work of God in the world.” – Azusa Pacific University
  36. 36. What is Academic Faith Integration? “Faith integration is informed reflection on and discovery of the relation(s) between the Christian faith within the academic disciplines, professional programs, the arts, and lived practice resulting in the articulation of Christian perspectives on truth and life in order to advance the work of God in the world.” – Azusa Pacific University
  37. 37. What is Academic Faith Integration? “Faith integration is informed reflection on and discovery of the relation(s) between the Christian faith within the academic disciplines, professional programs, the arts, and lived practice resulting in the articulation of Christian perspectives on truth and life in order to advance the work of God in the world.” – Azusa Pacific University
  38. 38. What is Academic Faith Integration? “Faith integration is informed reflection on and discovery of the relation(s) between the Christian faith within the academic disciplines, professional programs, the arts, and lived practice resulting in the articulation of Christian perspectives on truth and life in order to advance the work of God in the world.” – Azusa Pacific University
  39. 39. Academic Faith Integration Content Knowledg e Christian Faith Academic Faith Integration
  40. 40. Strategies for Academic Faith Integration Compatibility Strategy Emphasizes areas of harmony or compatibility between discipline and faith. Applications include 1) using biblical examples to illustrate disciplinary concepts (e.g., Moses as a leadership model) or 2) showing Christianity’s relevance to disciplinary knowledge (e.g., human nature, beauty, history) Transformationa l Strategy Remakes or transforms the discipline to align with Christian worldview. Applications include 1) advocating the existence of truth, reason, and meaning (e.g., creation of the world) and 2) upholding biblical authority in the discipline (e.g., sin as source of social ills). Reconstructioni st Strategy Replaces faulty foundation of the discipline with Christian worldview. Applications include 1) employing Christian worldview as the organizing principle to interpret the discipline (e.g., replace relativism with absolute truth) and 2) replacing disciplinary assumptions (e.g., replace random chance with God’s sovereignty) *Adapted from Beers and Beers (2008). “Integrating of Faith and Learning” in The Soul of a Christian University: A Field Guide for Educators.
  41. 41. Reflective Questions 1. THE WHAT (the investigation) • What are the foundational assumptions of the issue, course, or discipline? • How do I know that this knowledge claim is true? • Is there an agenda or ideology behind this conclusion? • What is the worldview behind or implied by the claim? 2. SO WHAT? (the interpretation) • How does the claim fit in with the Christian faith? • How could my worldview act as a filter to evaluate this subject? • What ethical questions does the knowledge/expertise in this subject raise? • What does this subject tell us about God? 3. NOW WHAT? (the application) • Where is the hope here? • How might we reclaim this area for the glory of God? • How could the restoration of this issue be a signpost for the kingdom of God? • How could learning in this subject affect my faith development? *Adapted from Beers and Beers (2008). “Integrating of Faith and Learning” in The Soul of a Christian University: A Field Guide for Educators.
  42. 42. Integrative Questions  English: What are the similarities and differences in interpreting the biblical texts and interpreting other literature texts?  Political Science: What is the role of forgiveness in international relations?  Fine Arts: What are the limits, if any, on the freedom for human creative expression?  History: How do alternative views on the “direction of history” (e.g., linear, cyclical, teleological) fit or not fit with the Christian narrative?  Economics: What is the relationship between the quest for profitability and the Christian call for compassion and justice?  Physics: What are the similarities and differences between the use of models in scientific inquiry and the use of models in theological inquiry?  Education: What is the relationship between subject-centered and student- centered teaching pedagogies in light of a Christian perspective on personhood?*Adapted from Beers and Beers (2008). “Integrating of Faith and Learning” in The Soul of a Christian University: A Field Guide for Educators.
  43. 43. Academic Faith Integration Resources https://www.apu.edu/faithintegration/
  44. 44. Designing the First Learning Unit for Your Course Dr. Michael Truong Executive Director, Office of Innovative Teaching & Technology Azusa Pacific University www.apu.edu
  45. 45. Online Course Blueprint Template Unit # Title of Unit Learning Outcomes Taken from syllabus and focused on current unit Overview Introductory text for students, providing an overview of what will be covered. Read Required & Optional Watch/Listen Required & Optional Discuss Forum discussions Do List learning activities, including assignments, group work, etc. Quiz List assessment activities, including quizzes, tests, exams, etc.
  46. 46. Walk-Through of Online Course Blueprint Template
  47. 47. Example of Learning Units
  48. 48. Selecting Learning Activities Source: Significant Learning Experience by Dee L. Fink (2003)
  49. 49. Selecting Learning Activities Source: Significant Learning Experience by Dee L. Fink (2003)
  50. 50. Resources for Designing Learning Unit
  51. 51. Developing Meaningful Assessments Dr. Michael Truong Executive Director, Office of Innovative Teaching & Technology Azusa Pacific University www.apu.edu
  52. 52. Developing Meaningful Assessments Two general categories of test items 1. Objective Items require students to select the correct response from several alternatives or to supply a word or short phrase to answer a question or complete a statement. A. Examples: multiple choice, true-false, matching, completion 2. Subjective or essay items which permit the student to organize and present an original answer. A. Examples: short-answer essay, extended-response essay, problem solving, performance test items Adapted from Clay, B. “Is This a Trick Question? A Short Guide to Writing Effective Test Questions.” Kansas State University.
  53. 53. Developing Meaningful Assessments Objective Items multiple choice true-false matching Completion Subjective or Essay Items short-answer essay extended-response essay problem solving performance test items • Objective items can be correctly answered through blind guessing. • Subjective or essay items emphasize written communication skills. • Essay items are generally easier and less time consuming to construct than are most objective test items, but require more time to grade. • When constructed well, both objective and essay test items are good devices for measuring student achievement. Adapted from Clay, B. “Is This a Trick Question? A Short Guide to Writing Effective Test Questions.” Kansas State University.
  54. 54. General Tips About Developing Assessments Length of Test Clear, Concise Instructio ns Mix it up! Test Early Test Often Check for Accuracy Proofread Exams One Wrong Answer Special Considera tions A Little Humor Adapted from Clay, B. “Is This a Trick Question? A Short Guide to Writing Effective Test Questions.” Kansas State University.
  55. 55. Resources for Developing Meaningful Assessments
  56. 56. Designing with Instructional Technology, OER, Videos and Screencasts Dr. Andrew Sears President, City Vision University www.cityvision.edu Co-Founder CHEIA www.cheia.org
  57. 57. When to Use Screencasts vs. “Talking Head” Videos Screencast  Teaching content  Provides information & detail  Cognitive learning  Examples: presentations, how- to videos, demonstrations Talking Head  Introduction and welcome  Provides personal presence  Affective learning or trust  Examples: sermons, motivational lectures, interviews
  58. 58. Design Challenges of Syllabus and Course Introduction (or why many students never read the syllabus) Institution Centered • Focus: Requirements from Accreditors & Regulators Student Centered • Focus: Usability for students Typical Syllabus Student Centered Course Introduction in LMS Brief Personal Video Intro “Student Centered” Syllabus • Simple like Apple • Seen by student • Example: Udemy • User interface designer • Use design principles • Verbose legal contract • Ignored by student • Example: most accredited schools • Designed by a lawyer • Use syllabus checklists
  59. 59. Image Source: https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/5e/The_SAMR_Model.jpg

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