Ways of knowing language summary

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  • Ways of knowing language summary

    1. 1. Ways of Knowing Languagesummary of Text by Richard van de Lagemaat Chapter 3
    2. 2. What is the Nature of Language?•Language is rule-governed•Language is intended•Language is creative and open-ended•Language is so much a part of human activity that it is easilytaken for granted.•The issues related to language and knowledge call forconscious scrutiny in order to recognize its influence onthought and behavior.
    3. 3. What else about language? Language can be thought of as a symbol system, engaged inrepresenting the world, capturing and communicating thoughtand experience. Language also can be seen as existing in itself, as something tobe played with and transformed and shaped in its own right andsomething that can transform and shape thought and action.
    4. 4. Language is Rule-governed When learning a foreign language, one of the main things youhave to learn is grammar. Grammar gives the rules for how to combine words in thecorrect order. Grammar helps to determine the meaning of a sentence. Jill hit Jack. We know Jill is the hitter and Jack is the hittee bythe way the sentence is structured. In English there is a rule which says that the noun before theverb is the subject and the one after the verb is the object.
    5. 5. Vocabulary in Language is Rule-governedThe other main element in language, vocabulary, is also governedby arbitrary rules. For the native English speaker, it feels as if there is a natural,almost magical, connection between the word “dog” and theanimal it stands for. It is the word our culture has settled on. It could just as wellhave been quan (Chinese), koira (Finnish), or kutta (Hindi). For communication to work, there needs to be generalagreements within the culture.
    6. 6. Language is Intended. Although language is a form of communication, not allcommunication is language.You can yawn because you are bored and want your teacher toknow or...You can yawn as a reflex but not want to communicate boredom. Information is communicated, but it is not consideredlanguage.
    7. 7. Language is Creative and Open-ended" The rules of grammar and vocabulary allow us to make an almostinfinite number of grammatically correct sentences."We are able to create and understand sentences that have never beenwritten or said before."Psychologist Stephen Pinker has determined that there are at least 1020grammatically correct English sentences. If you said one sentence every 5seconds, it would take one hundred trillion years to utter them all—that’s10,000 times longer than the universe has been in existence. Languages are not static entities, but change and develop over time.People invent new words or we borrow words from other languages all thetime. English is notorious for this phenomena. Technology adds newwords, as well."Shakespeare gave us such words as dwindle, frugal, and obscene."We have borrowed algebra (Arabic), kindergarten (German), andchutzpah (Yiddish), to name a few.
    8. 8. Nature of Language What different functions does language perform? Which are the most relevant in creating and communicatingknowledge? What did Aldous Huxley mean when he observed that ―Wordsform the thread on which we string our experience? To what extent is it possible to separate our experience of theworld from the narratives we construct of them? In what ways does written language differ from spokenlanguage in its relationship to knowledge?
    9. 9. Nature of Language Is it reasonable to argue for the preservation of establishedforms of language, for example, as concerns grammar, spelling,syntax, etc. Is a common world language a defensible project? What is the role of language in sustaining relationships ofauthority? Are there extenuating circumstances? How does technological change affect the way language is usedand the way communication takes place? What may have been meant by the comment, “How strangelydo we diminish a thing as soon as we try to express it inwords”? -Maeterlinck
    10. 10. The Problem of Meaning Since most of our knowledge comes to us through language, weneed to be clear about the meanings of words if we are tounderstand the information that is being communicated to us.
    11. 11. Language and Culture If people speak more than one language, is what they know differentin each language? Does language provide a different framework ofreality? How is the meaning of what is said affected by silences andomissions, pace tone of voice, and bodily movement? How might thesefactors be influenced in turn by the social or cultural context? What is lost in translation from one language to another? To what degree might different languages shape different self-concepts or world-concepts? What are the implications of this?
    12. 12. Theories of meaningThe following are three theories of what distinguishes meaningfulwords from meaningless ones. Definition theory Denotation theory Image theory
    13. 13. Definition TheoryResolve confusions about what a word means by consulting adictionary or authority• Triangle: noun, a plane figure with three straight sides and three angles• Table:• Love:
    14. 14. Definition Theory Criticisms• It would be impossible to define the word red to a blind personwho has never had sight. The main problem with the idea that the meaning of a word isits dictionary definition is not simply that most definitions arevague and imprecise, but, more fundamentally, that they onlyexplain the meanings of words by using other words. If we are toavoid being trapped in an endless circle of words, language, mustsurely connect with the world.
    15. 15. Denotation Theory According to the denotation theory what distinguishes ameaningful word from a meaningless one is that the former standsfor something while the latter does not. “France” means something because it stands for the country inEurope “Jumblat” is meaningless because there is nothing in the worldthat corresponds to it.
    16. 16. Denotation Theory: Criticisms While the denotation theory might work in the case of namessuch as “France” or “Socrates,” it seems to fall down in the case ofabstract words such as multiplication, freedom, and wisdom,which do not seem to stand for any thing. --you can point toexamples of wisdom but not wisdom itself. If we follow the idea further—we could not talk about peopleafter they die because with their death, the meaning of who theyare/were disappears with them.
    17. 17. Image Theory The meaning of a word is the mental image it stands for, andyou know the meaning of a word when you have the appropriateconcept in your mind. Example: you know what the word “freedom” means whenyour associate it with the concept of freedom.
    18. 18. Image Theory: Criticisms If meanings are in the mind then we can never be sure thatsomeone else understands the meaning of a word in the same waythat we do-or, indeed, that they understand it at all. The idea of “red” can be different for different people.
    19. 19. Meaning as Know-how Some say that rather than thinking of meanings as somethingthat can be found in dictionaries, or in the world, or in the mind,perhaps it would be better to say that meaning is a matter ofknow-how. You know the meaning of a word when you “know how” to useit correctly.
    20. 20. Problematic meaning Vagueness Ambiguity Secondary meaning Metaphor Irony
    21. 21. Vagueness Many words, such as fast and slow are intrinsically vague, andtheir meaning depends on context. Fast means one thing when you are talking about a longdistance runner and something else when you are talking aboutFormula 1 race-car driving. Vague words can be useful—they point us in the right direction.
    22. 22. Ambiguity Words and/or phrases have multiple meanings Example: The duchess cannot bear children. Ambiguity can be intentional to mislead people.
    23. 23. Secondary Meaning Words have a primary meaning or denotation Words have a secondary meaning or connotation Connotation refers to the web of associations that surroundsthe word. Connotations vary from person to person Words like love, death, school, and priest may have differentconnotations for different people. Sometimes we use euphemisms for harsh words because theyhave more acceptable connotations.
    24. 24. Metaphor We use language both literally and metaphorically. Example:Miranda has got her head in the clouds. Or Marvin is a pillar ofthe community. What is the difference between the following sentences: 1. My brother is a butcher. 2. My dentist is a butcher
    25. 25. Irony Saying of one thing in order to mean the opposite shows justhow problematic language in action can be. Nice weather, heh? Any more bright ideas, Einstein? We cannot necessarily take a statement at face (notice themetaphor) value Irony adds another layer of ambiguity to language.
    26. 26. Meaning and Interpretation There is an element of interpretation built into allcommunication. Rather than saying we either understand something or wedon’t, it might serve us better to say that there are levels ofmeaning in language.
    27. 27. Language and Translation “Who does not know another language does not know hisown.” Goethe 1749-1832 What can you learn about your primary language by studying asecond language?
    28. 28. Language and Translation There are approximately 3,000 different languages world wide. We tend to think our own language fits reality. What realities do we experience because we speakEnglish? What would be the advantages and disadvantages if everyonein the world spoke a single common language? In what ways does learning a second language contribute to,and expand, your knowledge of the world?
    29. 29. Three Problems of Translation Context: The meaning of a word in a language is partlydetermined by its relation to other words. For example, tounderstand what the word “chat” means in English, you also needto be aware of related words such as “talk,” and “gossip,” and“discuss,” each of which has a different shade of meaning.
    30. 30. Three Problems of TranslationUntranslatable Words: Every language contains words that havenot equivalent in other languages, and can only be translated bylengthy and inelegant paraphrase. For example, the English word “quaint” has no very preciseequivalent in other languages. Schlimmbesserung (German), means “an improvement thatactually makes things worse” Rojong (Indonesian), “the relationship among a group ofpeople committed to accomplishing a task of mutual benefit”
    31. 31. Three Problems of TranslationIdioms: a colloquial expression whose meaning cannot be workedout from the meanings of the words it contains. For example, “Don’t beat about the bush” or “He was born witha silver spoon in his mouth” or “Don’t beat a dead horse.” How would you go about trying to translate the followingidioms into another language? David is barking up the wrong tree Samuel was only pulling your leg Daniela is resting on her laurels.
    32. 32. Lost in TranslationWhat do linguists determine as criteria for good translation? Faithfulness—translation is faithful to original text Comprehensibility—the translation should becomprehensible Back translation: when we retranslate a translation back intoits original language, it should be approximate to the original.
    33. 33. Language and Thought Is it possible to think without language? How does language extend meaning? Limit meaning? Sapir-Whorf? To what extend does language generalize individual experience? To what extent do some kinds of personal experience eludeexpression in language? Are there things you know that you can’texpress in language? Can language be compared to other forms of symbolicrepresentation? How do “formal languages,” such as computer programminglanguages or mathematics, compare with the conventional written andspoken languages of everyday discourse?
    34. 34. Language and Knowledge How does the capacity to communicate personal experiencesand thoughts through language affect knowledge? Does puttingknowledge into a language change that knowledge? How does language come to be known? Is the capacity acquirelanguage innate? Most statements heard, spoken, read or written, facts areblended with values. How can an examination of languagedistinguish the subjective and ideological biases as well as valuesthat statements may contain? Why might such an examination bedesirable?
    35. 35. Language and Areas of KnowledgesAreas of Knowledge: Maths, Natural Science, Human Science,Ethics, The Arts, History How do the words we use to describe an idea affect ourunderstanding of the world? How does the language used to describe the past changehistory? How does the language used to describe human behavior orconditions impact the findings in the Human Sciences? How important are technical terms in different areas ofknowledge? To what extent might each area of knowledge be seen as havingits own language? Its own culture?

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