Drama, intro (ms)

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Drama, intro (ms)

  1. 1. Sweetwater Union High School District Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 1 Course Length: 1 Year Classroom Instruction and Review: 180 Hours Grade Level: 7th & 8th UC/CSU/College: District Requirement: Course Number: 80415 Credential Information: (Any below) Single Subject in English – K-12 Single Subject with a Supplemental Authorization in English - up to Curriculum grade 9 Single Subject with a Supplemental Authorization in Drama K-12 Course Prerequisites: None District Approved Textbook/Materials: Exploring Theatre, Glencoe, c2009, Basic Drama Projects, Perfection Learning, c2004, Theatre Arts, Glencoe, c2009 Pedagogical Philosophy: Theatre is a study and a reflection of life. It is through the study of drama students will come to learn about others and themselves and to gain a deeper understanding of the world we live. The Intro to Drama course allows students to explore and discover their artistic potential through the study and creation of theatre. The course is based on the philosophy of the California Framework for the Visual and Performing Arts. These standards provide a framework for the study that develops and strengthens the students’ comprehension, analytical, and communication skills. These standards also provide for the development of performance skills and techniques as well as the acquisition of knowledge pertinent to this discipline. As students develop these skills and gain the knowledge, they begin to apply and utilize both in their own original works of theatre as well as in the work of others. ESLR’s: Intro to Drama provides all students a variety of opportunities to develop the following ESLR Skills: 1. Self-Directed Learner Drama provides all students an array of opportunities and experiences to develop and apply essential skills valuable in achieving personal, educational, and career goals. In the theatre environment, students will understand the importance of self-discipline, dedication, and focus in attaining goals. They will develop organizational and time management skills in order to adhere to deadlines and accomplish theatrical tasks. In building an ensemble, students will learn mutual respect. They will learn to work cooperatively and effectively with all types of people in achieving a common goal. As a team member, they will learn to act responsibly and ethically in the interaction with others. Through the study of drama, students will become exposed and familiar with a variety of theatre career opportunities. They will be able to identify the necessary skills and qualifications associated with each career studied. Students will also come to discover and appreciate theater not only for its entertainment value but for its educational value as well. They will learn how to utilize theatre as an educational vehicle in enlightening others on how to maintain mental, physical, and social wellness.
  2. 2. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 2 2. Culturally Empowered Community Member Drama lends itself to the exploration and study of man and his universe. Students will be exposed to the world’s cultural diversity through the study of theatre history. They will gain a more global perspective on the role of theatre in people’s lives by learning about their traditions, beliefs, and values. Students will come to understand, respect, and appreciate the influences and contributions of other cultures to theatre. They will also gain an awareness of the contributions of artists from diverse cultures and backgrounds. Through the study and development of scripts and characters, students will gain a deeper understanding of themselves, others, and life. They will not only understand and appreciate the theatrical contributions of people from their cultures, but they will gain a sense of pride and accomplishment. 3. Effective Communicator Drama provides ample opportunities for creative and artistic expression. Students will brainstorm for ideas and determine how best to communicate their concepts and ideas to others. They will employ their imagination and apply their creativity to original works of theatre. Students will learn how to become effective communicators not simply by delivering lines from a script, but more importantly, through the soulful analysis of the character and the careful interpretation of lines. They will learn how to incorporate the use of gestures, facial expressions, and body language to enhance meaning in the portrayal of their characters. As a team member, students will build and strengthen interpersonal skills. They will improve their communication skills not only in their performances but also in their daily interaction and collaboration with others as they discuss, prepare, and complete a variety of assignments, projects, and performances. The scope of theatrical assignments and tasks will not only improve and strengthen their skills in speaking but their skills in listening and reading as well. 4. Productive Individual Drama is a collaborative art. It requires students to participate collaboratively with the group as well as independently of the group. Students must not only learn lines on their own and develop their own characters, but they must learn to be part of an ensemble in order to complete tasks and attain unity. Students will develop and demonstrate strong skills in communication, organization, and time management in the preparation of individual and group projects and performances. During the planning and rehearsal process, they will rely on their creativity and knowledge to make aesthetic decisions and apply problem- solving skills in managing challenges that might arise during the production process. They will identify, plan, and use resources effectively in completing a variety of tasks from incorporating the principles of the dramatic structure to their original scripts to making artistic choices in the staging of their performances. Based on their knowledge and understanding of theatre, they will develop a criteria in assessing not only the work of others but also their own work so as to improve and produce quality work in the future.
  3. 3. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 3 District Course Content Standards and Content Objectives First Semester 1. Students observe their environment and respond, using the elements of theatre. They also observe formal and informal works of theatre, film/video, and electronic media and respond, using the vocabulary of theatre. 1.1 Use the vocabulary of theatre, such as playwright, rehearsal, dress rehearsal, run-through, and cold reading, to describe theatrical experiences. 1.2 Identify dramatic elements within a script, such as foreshadowing, crisis, rising action, catharsis, and denouement, using the vocabulary of theatre. 2. Students apply processes and skills in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting to create formal and informal theatre, film/video, and electronic media productions and to perform in them. 2.1 Use improvisation in rehearsal to discover character and motivation. 2.3 Create characters, environment, and actions that exhibit tension and suspense. 3. Students analyze the role and development of theatre, film/video, and electronic media in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting diversity as it relates to theatre. 3.1 Design and create masks, puppets, props, costumes, or sets in a selected theatrical style drawn from world cultures, such as Japanese shadow puppets or Kabuki masks. 3.2 Compare and contrast various theatre styles throughout history, such as those of Ancient Greece, Elizabethan theatre, Kabuki theatre, Kathakali dance theatre, and Commedia dell’arte. 4. Students critique and derive meaning from works of theatre, film / video, electronic media, and theatrical artists on the basis of aesthetic qualities. 4.1 Design and apply appropriate criteria of rubrics for evaluating the effective use of masks, puppetry, makeup, and costumes in a theatrical presentation.
  4. 4. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 4 Second Semester 1. Students observe their environment and respond, using the elements of theatre. They also observe formal and informal theatre, film/video, and electronic media and respond, using the vocabulary of theatre. 1.2 Use the vocabulary of the theatre, such as playwright, rehearsal, dress rehearsal, run-through, and cold reading, to describe theatrical experiences. 2. Students apply processes and skills in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting to create formal and informal theatre, film/video, and electronic media productions and to perform in them. 2.1 Use improvisation in rehearsal to discover character and motivation. 2.2 Maintain a rehearsal/script notebook to record directions and blocking. 3. Students analyze the role and development of theatre, film/video and electronic media in past and present cultures throughout history, noting diversity as it relates to theatre. 3.2 Compare and contrast various theatre styles through history, such as Ancient Greece, Elizabethan theatre, Kabuki theatre, Kathakali dance theatre, and Commedia dell’arte. 5. Students apply what they learn in theatre, film/video, and electronic media across subject areas. They develop competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication, and time management that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills. They also learn about careers in and related to theatre. 5.2 Demonstrate projection, vocal variety, diction, gesture, and confidence in oral presentations.
  5. 5. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 5 Component Strand: ARTISTIC PERCEPTION Standard: 1.0 Students observe their environment and respond, using the elements of theatre. They also observe formal and informal works of theatre, film/video, and electronic media and respond, using the vocabulary of theatre. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 1.1 Use of the vocabulary of theatre, such as playwright, rehearsal, dress rehearsal, run- through, cold reading, to describe theatrical experiences. None Ad-lib Apron Aside Backdrop Backstage Balance Bit part Build Character part Cheat Clear stage Climax Cold reading Costume props Counter cross Cue Curtain call Cut Cyclorama Dialogue Director Double cast Downstage Dress rehearsal Dressing the stage Extras Flat Floor plan Focus Fourth wall Freezing Give stage Heavy Hold House Ingénue Juvenile Kill Lead Legs Mask Mood Notes Open Pace Pick up your cues Places Plant Playwright Preview Production Prologue Prop box Reading Rehearsal Repertory Royalty Run through Scene Script Set Set props Soliloquy Stage props Stage whisper Steal Strike Tableaux Tagline Take the stage Teaser Tempo Theater Throw away Timing Top Tormentor Trap Traveler Understudy Upstage Wings Range: Acquisition: Proficient:
  6. 6. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 6 Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Given ten sentences with a missing theatre term • Given a list of theatre terms to choose from • The student will select the best term that gives correct meaning to the sentence • Vocabulary Quiz • Vocabulary Test Read each sentence below and fill in the blank with the term that gives correct meaning to the sentence. 1. The director reminded us to ______if we forget a line 2. Our task is to create _____ and use props that are appropriate for our character and the situation. 3. My _____ included waltzing across the stage with an imaginary partner. ad-lib blocking build business characterization costume cue dialogue director focus Match the definition on the right to its term on the left. Write the letter of your choice in the space provided to the left. ____ 1. Movement or lines inserted a. blocking into the play which were not in the script and often used to b. director cover a mistake c. ad-lib ____2. Planned movement of the actors onstage. ____3. Person in charge of the artistic production of the play State and district produced vocabulary lists Drama A to Z – Jack A. Vaughn Teacher constructed quiz/test Provide visuals (e.g. provide diagram of the stage, actor’s body positions, types of stages, etc.) Incorporate modeling demonstrations by teacher and/or student volunteers with a scene to improvise such as a disagreement between two siblings on who has to stay home and baby-sit Friday evening. Have them illustrate what the term and the command to build the scene means based on its definition; improvise a scene between two people waiting to interview for a job; one is extremely calm while the other is extremely nervous. Have volunteers create business appropriate for each character to communicate physical, emotional, and mental state of the character.
  7. 7. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 7 Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) • Given a list of ten theatre terms • Given instructions to write ten original sentences relating to theatre using the terms • The student will write the sentences of no less than seven words each Write a sentence for each of the following theatre terms, using no less than seven words per sentence. Underline term. ad-lib blocking build business characterization costume cue dialogue director focus I had to ad-lib when the lead forgot her cue and did not make her entrance on time. Exploring Theatre: Teacher’s Resource Binder (reproducible vocabulary puzzle) Vocabulary Worksheets Vocabulary Builders SDAIE Strategy: numbered heads together – Group members number themselves off 1 thru 4; provide groups with the oral definition of the term; group members arrive at a consensus on the correct term; call out a number; members whose number is called reveals answer on white board; members reveal their answers at the same time Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Having acquired theatre vocabulary • Having observed a theatre performance • The student will write a paragraph reflecting on and/or critiquing the performance using at least seven theatre terms and/or • The student will give an oral critique of a video-taped or live performance, using at least seven theatre terms in their review and/or • The student will write a self- performance assessment of one paragraph, using no less than seven theatre terms addressing their strengths and weaknesses Write a one-paragraph review of a dramatic performance, using at least seven theatre terms correctly to analyze the strengths and weaknesses. You must substantiate your findings with examples. Also include suggestions and recommendations for improvement. Take notes while observing a performance, focusing on both strengths and weaknesses. Be prepared to give an oral critique using at least seven theatre terms correctly. You must substantiate your findings with examples. Also include suggestions and recommendations for improvement for future work. Write one paragraph assessing your performance. You must use a minimum of at least seven theatre terms correctly in your analysis of both strengths and weaknesses. Make sure to include suggestions and recommendations for improvement for future work. The Least You Should Know About Theatre – Clark Stevens (reproducible lessons and activities) Check list for reviewers Exploring Theatre - Nancy Prince & Jeanie Jackson Sample reviews from magazines, newspapers, etc. SDAIE Strategy: Quick write “What was your favorite movie or play?” Have an open discussion on movies students have seen. Use the vocabulary of the theatre to analyze strengths and weaknesses in the movie; what factors categorize a good movie versus a great movie? A bad movie?
  8. 8. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 8 Component Strand: ARTISTIC PERCEPTION Standard: 1.0 Students observe their environment and respond, using the elements of theatre. They also observe formal and informal works of theatre, film/video, and electronic media and respond, using the vocabulary of theatre. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 1.2 Identify dramatic elements within a script, such as foreshadowing, crisis, rising action, catharsis, and denouement, using the vocabulary of theatre. Understanding the meaning of the dramatic elements and/or structure Antagonist Character Climax Conflict Crisis Denouement (resolution) Dramatic structure Exposition Falling Action Foreshadowing Genre Initial incident Motivation Objective Playwright Plot Point of attack Protagonist Rising action Subplot Subtext Theme Range: Acquisition: Proficient:
  9. 9. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 9 Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Given a diagram of the basic dramatic structure • Given a list of dramatic elements relevant to a generic plot • The student will label the diagram correctly • Given the meanings of the dramatic elements in a script • Given the elements or terms • The student will match the element or term correctly to its definition • Quiz • Final f)____________ e)_____________ g)__________ d)____________ h)________ c)______ a) _____ b)_______ Using the terms listed below, label the diagram in the correct sequence that they would appear in a generic plot. conflict climax rising action exposition denouement initial incident falling action crisis Read each definition carefully and match it to the correct term. Write your answer in the space provided to the left. a. foreshadowing b. climax c. conflict ____1. the struggle between two opposing forces ____2. to create expectation for the audience that something will occur ____3. the most exciting moment and turning point in the play Drama: A Comprehensive Guide to Dramatic Elements and Style – Clark Stevens The Least You Should Know About Drama (reproducible lessons and activities) – Clark Stevens Teacher constructed dramatic structure diagram Teacher-constructed quiz and/or test on a specific play and its dramatic structure and elements SDAIE strategies such as KWL chart e.g. “What are the important elements/parts of a plot or a story?” Select two teams each with eight players; Hand each player from each team one word from the dramatic structure (use words listed to the left). Words should be written large enough to see. Teams compete to arrange the words and position themselves in the correct order, as they would appear in a generic plot. Class discussions (e.g. of play being read out loud in class) Lecture Cornell Note taking Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) • Provided with an outline of a dramatic structure • Provided with a copy of the teacher selected script • With the teacher’s guidance, the student will complete each component of the outline as the play is read out loud, analyzed and discussed in class For each component of the dramatic structure outline, determine and take notes on the most important bit(s) of information, as the play is discussed and analyzed. Write the information on the lines provided. Exposition: (the background information necessary in understanding the characters and their relationships, past actions, setting, etc.) • ___________________________________________ • ___________________________________________ • ___________________________________________ Initial incident: (the first most important event or moment from which the rest of the plot develops) • ___________________________________________ How to Analyze Drama – Christopher Russell Reaske Teacher-constructed play analysis outline Teacher selected scripts for analysis (recommendations: Oh, What a Tangled Web: The Widow’s Plight; or if putting on a production in the near future, use the production script to be produced). Cooperative learning groups – Providing a dramatic structure outline and using fairy tales as a source, have students in their groups apply the dramatic structure and elements to their choice of a fairy tale. Students identify as many of the dramatic elements in their fairy tale. Have groups share their analysis with the rest of the class and re-enact the fairy tale based on their analysis.
  10. 10. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 10 Notes: Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Given a dramatic outline and topic(s) • Having formed writing groups of three to four by the teacher • Students will write and perform an original script, incorporating the dramatic elements of a play Complete the dramatic outline for teacher approval prior to writing your script. Topic: _____________________________________________ Genre: _____________________________________________ Plot summary: ______________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ ___________________________________________________ Theme: ____________________________________________ Characters: __________________ ____________________ __________________ ____________________ Exposition: • __________________________________________ • __________________________________________ • __________________________________________ Initial Incident: • ___________________________________________ • ___________________________________________ Conflict • ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Rising Action: • ___________________________________________ • ___________________________________________ • ___________________________________________ • ___________________________________________ Climax • ___________________________________________ ___________________________________________ Falling Action • ___________________________________________ • ___________________________________________ Denouement • ___________________________________________ How to Prepare and Give a Speech (Writing a Play) – Michael Kramme Using his or her own life experiences, have student write down an event or situation on an index card that might serve as a great source or foundation from which to base a play on. It should be an event with a conflict. Using the SDAIE strategy, Round Robin, have each student take a turn sharing. Consider sharing some ideas with the class.
  11. 11. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 11 Component Strand: CREATIVE EXPRESSION Standard: 2.0 Students apply processes and skills in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting to create formal and informal theatre, film/video, and electronic media productions and to perform them. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 2.1 Use improvisation in rehearsal to discover character and motivation. Understanding the Guidelines for Improvisation Improvisation Improvise Role Playing Character Dialogue Conflict Motivation Point of view Breaking character Dead-end phrases Range: Acquisition: Proficient: Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Having discussed the guide lines for performing improvisations • Using the SDAIE strategy, Anticipatory Guide • Students demonstrate their understanding of the do’s and don’ts in performing improvisations by either agreeing or disagreeing with the statements Note: Can also be done in true/false quiz format AGREE DISAGREE Drawing on your memory of real-life characters and imitating them is helpful in performing improvisations _______ _______ In performing improvisations, you need only communicate your character through dialogue _______ _______ Laughing at yourself or others while performing in an improvisation is acceptable. _______ _______ Words such as “no,” “I don’t know,” “Well,” “So,” “I guess,” and “Whatever,” may be considered dead-end words that stifle the dialogue. _______ _______ A well constructed improv includes a beginning, middle and end with a conflict _______ _______ Exploring Theatre – Nancy Prince & Jeanine Jackson Writing Your Own Plays Creating, Adapting, Improvising – Carol Korty SDAIE strategy – Quick write What is make-believe and what is involved?
  12. 12. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 12 Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) • Given an improvisational prompt to explore characters and motivation (or improvisational prompts that explore character relationships and conflict) • Given a partner(s) • The student will improvise action and dialogue focusing on character and motivation (or character relationships and conflict) Choose a partner(s) and one of the following situations to improvise. You will be given ten minutes to discuss setting, characters, and basic plot (beginning, middle, and end) as well as the conflict. Make sure to keep in mind the guidelines for improvisation. a. To the dismay of the parents, son/daughter chooses to join the military instead of applying to college b. Teenage daughter tries to defend herself after trying to sneak in past curfew. The worried parents are now furious and threaten consequences c. Three friends go shopping. One witnesses another shoplifting and decides to confront her/him to convince her/him to return the item Theatre Games for Young Performers: Improvisations & Exercises for Developing Acting Skills – Maria C. Novelly Creative Drama in the Classroom: Improvisation: Characters Move and Speak – Nellie McCaslin Improvisations Starters – Philip Bernardi Can of Squirms - Meriwether Cooperative Learning Improvisational activities, games, and exercises Role Playing Story Dramatizations Story building (a person starts the story; then another person picks up the story and adds to it; leader calls out next, and the next person continues where the story left off and the cycle continues) Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Having divided students into groups • Being assigned a teacher selected published skit or excerpt from a play • Students will rehearse and perform it for class (note: performers may stay on book) • Then teacher will select the same actors to portray their characters and improvise scenes that might have taken place before the start of the skit, during the course of the skit, or after the ending of the skit. • Teacher and/or students determine the circumstance(s) to be improvised. • or • Having read and analyzed a play • Having been divided into pairs/groups • Students will select and improvise a scene (student or teacher constructed) that might have taken place before the beginning of the play, during the course of the play, or after the ending of the play. or You will improvise a scene that might have logically taken place before the start of the play, elsewhere during the play, or after the end of the play. For example, how would the scene play out between (choice of characters) if the play had continued? Choose one of the following scenes to perform a one to two minute improvisation. Focus on characterization and motivation keeping in mind what you have already discovered about the characters through the play analysis. Dialogue and action should be consistent with the character and situation. You will have ten minutes to discuss ideas. A scene in the castle between Robin Hood and Maid Marion when they use to play together as children A scene between King Richard, Lady Merle, and Prince John before he leaves for the Crusades Teacher-created worksheet and/or outlines (e.g. character analysis outline – students fill out a character analysis chart on a selected character; an adjective or characteristic is listed on each line to describe the character; then the supporting source as evidence (e.g. playwright, or other character; then the line and/or action supporting the adjective or characteristic listed) Drama that Delivers: Real life Problems, Students’ Solutions – Nancy Duffy Hery The Colorful Kidnapping – Cheryl Miller Thurston SDAIE strategy: Webbing Divide class into groups; each group draws a character’s name to analyze: using the webbing strategy; the groups list as many adjectives or descriptive phrases for their character; they also list evidence or source in support (e.g. either action or line) then groups share their character web with the class or Have students complete a character web on themselves before completing one on a character from a play Graphic organizers
  13. 13. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 13 • Having learned the dramatic structure • Being assigned playwriting groups and a topic upon which to write a play about (e.g. stage fright) • The students will use the technique of of improvisation in the writing of their scripts to discover character and motivation (or to develop and explore character relationships and conflict) A scene between Lady Merle and the sheriff upon hearing about King Richard’s departure. A scene between Maid Marion and King Richard informing her of his departure and his decision to leave her under the care of Lady Merle A scene between Lady Merle and Prince John discussing the possibility of marriage between Maid Marion and himself. A scene between the sheriff, the sheriff’s wife, and Salome discussing Lady Merle’s character. A scene between Robin Hood, Will, and Little John as they try to talk him out of attending Lady Merle’s Fair. A scene between Kaspar and Lady Merle before the archery contest A scene between the sheriff and Lady Merle after Robin escapes capture when his true identity is discovered A scene between Friar Tuck and a soldier in the castle as he tries to sneak by, disguised as a chef In this improvisational prompt, a student has been assigned the lead in the upcoming school production. Unfortunately, just a couple of days before opening night, the student becomes very apprehensive about performing in front of an audience and insists he/she cannot go on. There is no understudy. Choose one of the following scenes to improvise with a partner. a. Scene between the performer and the director b. Scene between the performer and co-actor c. Scene between the performer and his/her parent Notes: The teacher constructed improvisational selections provided are applicable to the play, Robin Hood by Tim Kelly. You may wish to have two groups do the same improvisational scene for comparison and interpretation.
  14. 14. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 14 Component Strand: CREATIVE EXPRESSION Standard: 2.0 Students apply processes and skills in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting to create formal and informal theatre, film/videos, and electronic media productions and to perform in them. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 2.2 Maintain a rehearsal/script notebook to record direction and blocking. Familiarity with actor’s body positions Familiarity with stage areas Familiarity with blocking Notations/symbols; abbreviations Acting Areas Actor’s body positions Blocking Business Cheat Cue Dialogue Floor plan Motivation Open Props Scene Script Share Stage abbreviations Stage directions Range: Acquisition: Proficient: Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Given a proscenium stage diagram with stage abbreviations • Given the blocking terms • The student 1) label the nine stage areas correctly; 2) provide the correct blocking notation/abbreviation for the words; 3) convert stage directions into stage abbreviations correctly (vice versa);4) label the eight actor’s body positions correctly • Quiz • Test 1) Label the stage areas using stage abbreviations C Audience LC UR DL UC DR UL DC RC C 2) Provide the script notation for each word Cross = ____X____ Exit = ___En_____ X D L St 1/4 R __________________________________________ Cross down left and stand one quarter right District produced notation guide Exploring Theatre: Teacher’s Resource Binder (Resource Script Marking Guide) – Nancy Prince & Jeanie Jackson Theatre Art I: Teacher’s Course Guide – Alan Engelsman & Penny Engelsman Sample noted scripts Teacher constructed quiz/test SDAIE strategy - Quick write What is the purpose of movement on stage? Lecture Cornell Note taking Cooperative learning Learning the actor’s body positions, have the students stand up and respond to directions. Indicate which wall is the audience then call out body positions. (e.g. stand full front; stand full back; stand one quarter right. For fun, do the exercise incorporating “Simon Says.”)
  15. 15. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 15 3) Convert the script notation into complete sentences. Enter stage right and cross center and stand full front __________________________________________ EN SR X C ST FF Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) • Having demonstrated on stage the different areas of the stage • The student will correctly follow a set of directions given by the teacher Note: Give a set of directions using letters of the alphabet, shapes, and numbers. If the student follows the stage directions correctly, he/she will have drawn one of the above clearly for the audience. You may have the other students observe carefully and indicate on their papers what their classmate has etched on the stage floor. • Having learned the stage abbreviations and notations • Have completed the practice worksheets on stage abbreviations • The student will create five sets of stage directions in written form and then provide the stage-abbreviated form for each one correctly. Each one should contain no less than five stage abbreviations. You will each demonstrate your understanding of the stage areas by following my stage directions carefully. If you have done so, you will have etched on stage a letter of the alphabet, a number, or a shape clearly for the audience. 1. Let’s begin upstage right 2. Now cross upstage center 3. Cross upstage left 4. Cross center 5. Cross downstage right 6. Cross downstage center 7. Cross downstage left (if the student completed the set of directions correctly, they would have drawn the letter Z) 1. Let’s begin upstage center 2. Now cross upstage right 3. Cross right center 4. Cross center 5. Cross downstage center 6. Cross downstage right (if the student completed the set of directions correctly, they would have etched the or letter S or the number 5) Create five different sets of stage directions in written form and then provide the stage-abbreviated form for each one. Each set of directions should contain no less than five abbreviations. e.g. 1. Enter center right, cross down left, and stand one quarter right. En CR X DL St 1/4 R Sample notated scripts Teacher constructed stage notation/abbreviation worksheets Share/pair evaluation for script notation
  16. 16. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 16 Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Assigned a performing group • Given a published scene/skit to prepare • Having designed their own floor plan • The student will maintain a script notebook, creating a minimum of three bits of business for their character. Student will record their blocking/directions for their character with a minimum of five sets of directions using script notation. You will rehearse your scene creating and recording all directions and blocking. You must have a minimum of three bits of business and five sets of blocking, using script notation. Make sure to write down the blocking on your scripts using pencil. The Drama Handbook; Teaching Acting Through Scene Work – Davina Rubin Notes:
  17. 17. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 17 Component Strand: CREATIVE EXPRESSION Standard: 2.0 Students apply processes and skills in acting, directing, designing, and scriptwriting to create formal and informal theatre, film/video, and electronic media productions and to perform in them. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 2.3 Create characters, environments, and actions that exhibit tensions and suspense. Familiarity with the dramatic structure and elements Understanding the Guidelines for Improvisation Beat Character analysis Characterization Climax Complication Foreshadowing Improvise Improvisation Motivation Mood Objective Setting Tactic Tension Suspense Range: Acquisition: Proficient: Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Quiz • Test Match the definition on the right to its term on the left. Write the letter of your choice in the space provided to the left. 1. ___ A snarl, twist, entanglement, or jam a. conflict in the rising action b. beat 2. ___ The highest point of interest or excitement c. suspense 3. ___ The main problem or obstacle d. complication 4. ___ A unit of action (e.g. change in e. climax emotion) 5. ___ The growing excitement, anticipation, or uncertainty felt as the story builds Exploring Theatre – Nancy Jackson The Dynamics of Acting – Joan Snyder & Michael P. Drumsta Teacher constructed quiz/test Lecture Cornell Note taking
  18. 18. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 18 Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) • Having paired/grouped students • Having been provided a situation and characters • Having provided fifteen minutes to discuss ideas in regards to the characters and situation • Student will improvise and develop a scene, focusing on developing tension and suspense by the arrangement of complications You will choose a partner(s) to perform an improv prompt listed below. You should have a beginning, middle, and an end with a clear conflict. You will have fifteen minutes to determine your characters and discuss ideas. Remember the middle (rising action) should consist of a variety of complications that grow in intensity. Arrange your complications to exhibit tension and suspense as your scene develops and progresses. a. Friends on a road trip experience car trouble end up in a ghost town Theatre Games for Young Performers – Maria C. Novelly Improvisation Starters – Philip Bernardi Can of Squirms – Meriwether Teacher constructed improv ideas The Camping Script – Internet Improvisational games, activities, and exercises Role Playing Cooperative Learning Taking random scenes from a fairy tale (or other teacher selected source) have students arrange them in chronological order Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Having studied the dramatic structure and elements • Having been assigned groups • Having been given a circumstance • Having completed the dramatic structure outline (see 1.2) • Students will write, rehearse, and perform an original skit creating characters, environments, and actions that exhibit tension and suspense In groups of three to four, you will write a five to seven minute script on (teacher assigned topic) following the dramatic structure and incorporating the elements of a play. You will create characters, situations, and actions that exhibit tension and suspense. You will self-direct, plan business, and incorporate blocking, using script notation. How to Prepare and Give a Speech (Writing a Play) – Michael Kramme Teaching Young Playwrights – Gerald Chapman Playmaking – Daniel Judah Sklar Writing Your Own Plays – Carol Korty Playwriting Step by Step – Marsh Cassady Teacher constructed dramatic structure outline Sample scripts Show video taped original skits from former students Writing groups Notes:
  19. 19. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 19 Component Strand: HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT Standard: 3.0 Students analyze the role and development of theatre, film/video, and electronic media in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting diversity as it relates to theatre. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 3.1 Design and create masks, puppets, props, costumes, or sets in a selected theatrical style drawn from world cultures, such as Japanese shadow puppets or Kabuki masks. The study and analysis of theatrical styles and cultures. Bunraku Ceremony Festival Greek Theatre Ritual Commedia dell’arte Kabuki theatre Marionettes Noh theatre Range: Acquisition: Proficient: Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Quiz • Test Read each question below and determine the correct answer. Write the answer in the space provided to the left. 1. ____ Which of the following theatre styles used highly stylized makeup instead of masks in theatrical performances a. Greek theatre c. Kabuki b. Commedia dell’arte d. Noh 2. ____ Which theatre style incorporated five distinct types of masks (gods, men, women, madmen, and demons) a. Greek theatre c. Kabuki b. Commedia dell’arte d. Noh Cut and Make … Masks – A.G. Smith and Josie Hazen Play Production Today – Jonniepat Mobley Exploring Theatre - Nancy Prince & Jeanie Jackson The World of Theatre – Scholastic Discovery Music and Performing Arts Teacher constructed quiz/test SDAIE strategy – Anticipatory Chart – KWL, “What I know about Masks?” Lecture Cornell Notes Graphic Organizers Venn Diagram Comparison/Contrast Chart
  20. 20. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 20 Notes: Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) • Having studied and analyzed a selected theatrical style • Having been provided a mask template • Having been provided with the necessary art materials and supplies • Student will make a rendering of an original concept for a mask, reflecting the theatrical style and/or culture and/or • Student will make a rendering of a theatre or stage from a selected theatrical style (e.g. Greek, Pageant Wagon, Kabuki etc.) You will make a rendering of an original mask, reflecting the Greek Style of theatre and/or its culture. On your rendering, indicate how you will embellish your mask by labeling what and where materials will be used and placed. You will make a rendering or diagram of a theatre or stage from a selected theatrical style. Label parts and areas where applicable. Mask Template Puppets: Methods and Alan Fortney Incredible Art Department – Internet Masks & Aesops Fables – Internet Masks Around The World – Internet Mask making Intro (video)– Masks From Many Cultures – Crystal Productions In text questions – Students answer teacher constructed questions about a reading selection as they read it. Students review their answer with their small group, and then share with the whole group. Visual aids (pictures or photos Greek, Chinese, Japanese productions) Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Having completed a rendering of an original mask concept • Having been provided with the necessary art supplies and materials • Student will create and design an original mask based on Greek theatre (or selected theatre style) and/or culture • Having completed teacher constructed questionnaire or guide in regards to design (e.g. what is the function or purpose of your mask? What emotion or mood does your mask convey; etc.) • Student will give an oral presentation explaining their original mask design and how it reflects the Greek theatrical style (or selected theater style) and/or culture through their creation and design. or • Student will construct a model of a theatre or stage from a theatrical style (e.g. Greek, Pageant Wagon, Elizabethan, Kabuki, etc.) You will give an oral presentation on the mask you have created, discussing your design as it relates to the Greek theatre style, customs, and/or culture. You will construct a model of a theatre or stage from a theatrical style and give an oral presentation describing the characteristics of the theatre or stage of that period. Make A Mask – Sander Johnson, Tim Murphy, Patricia Ryan Sarka, & Ann de la Sota Paper Masks and Puppets for Stories, Songs, and Plays – Ron and Marsha Feller The Usborne Book of Masks – Ray Gibson Teacher constructed questions relating to students’ mask presentation (to be used a guide for students in preparing them for their oral presentation). Art Catalogues Nasco Arts & Crafts Blick Art Materials Sax Arts & Crafts
  21. 21. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 21 Component Strand: HISTORICAL AND CULTURAL CONTEXT Standard: 3.0 Students analyze the role and development of theatre, film/video, and electronic media in past and present cultures throughout the world, noting diversity as it relates to theatre. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 3.2 Compare and contrast various theatre styles history, such as Ancient Greece, Elizabethan theatre, Kabuki theatre, Kathakal dance theatre, and Commedia dell’arte. None Aeschylus Aristophanes Athens Aristotle Chorus Comedy Dionysus Dithyramb Euripides Menander Orchestra Satyr Skene Sophocles Thespsis Tragedy Cycles Miracle Mystery Pageant Wagon Trope No Theatre Bunraku Kabuki Sanskrit drama Ben Johnson Christopher Marlow Globe Theatre Shakespeare Renaissance Lope De Vega Calderon Range: Acquisition: Proficient:
  22. 22. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 22 Commedia dell’arte Improvise Stock characters Moliere Opera Proscenium Three dimensional scenery Restoration Legitimate Aphra Behn William Congreve David Garrick Richard Brinsley Sheridan WilliamWycherley Romanticism Melodrama Realism Lorraine Hansberry Eugene O’Neil Tennessee Williams Musical George Cohan Jerome Kern George and Ira Gershwin Irving Berlin Rodgers and Hammerstein
  23. 23. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 23 Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Quiz • Test Read statement below and determine which one does not apply to the theatre style stated. Choose the best answer and write the letter of your choice in the space provided to the left. 1. ____ In reference to Greek theatre which statement does not apply a. Plays were performed only a few times a year at religious festivals b. The theatre was built into a hillside c. Greek actors wore highly stylized makeup d. Greek theatre consisted of one to three actors and a chorus Exploring Theatre – Nancy Prince & Jeanie Jackson Arts Edge: Greek Theatre – Internet Teacher constructed in-text questions Teacher constructed quiz/test SDAIE strategy: Anticipatory Guide – given a series of statements that relate to a reading selection, lecture, or video. Students indicate agree’ or ‘disagree’. After the information has been presented, students check to see if they are correct Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) Student will complete a graphic organizer filling in the requested information as it pertains to the specific theatre period (e.g.) Theatre Period: Greek Period Origin, roots or religious rituals and Influences: celebrations Purpose: worship of Dionysus, god of wine and harvest; religious occasion Staging: amphitheatre; open air theatre built on a hillside Type of Plays: tragedies, comedies, Source: myths and legends Plot: stories of gods and heroes Themes: showed how good and evil are always in conflict Complete the graphic organizer below on the theater style being discussed and analyzed. Complete the requested info only where applicable to the period being studied. Theatre Period: Roman Theatre Origin, roots or influences: Purpose: Staging: Types of Play: Teacher constructed graphic organizer Theatre Through the Ages – Michael Kramme Play Production – Jonniepat Mobley The World of Theatre - Scholastic (Voyages of Discovery: Music And Performing Arts) The Theatre – William M. Hutchinson Starting Drama – Eric Boagey Visual aids (photos and diagrams) of Greek, Elizabethan, and Asian Theatres In-text questions – Students answer teacher-constructed questions about a reading selection as they read it. Students review their answers in a small group then share them with the whole group. Lecture Cornell Note taking Graphic organizers Comparison-Contrast Chart or Matrix Venn Diagram Timelines (noting important events in theatre)
  24. 24. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 24 Notes: Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Having studied and analyzed several theatre styles • Student will write a one-page paper comparing and contrasting the theatre elements (plays, stages, staging, costumes, etc.) from two periods in theatre history (e.g. Greek and Elizabethan) • or • Having studied and analyzed several theatre styles • Presenting a series of pictures, photos, or slide show (e.g. pageant wagon) • Student will be able to identify theatre elements (plays, stages, costumes, staging, etc.) pertaining to a particular theatre style and/or culture Choose two periods in theatre history to write a one-page paper, comparing and contrasting the theatre elements (plays, stages, staging, costumes, etc.) from two different theatre styles. (e.g. Greek Theatre and Elizabethan Theatre). Analyze photo number one depicting a stage. Identify which theatre style and /or culture it pertains to. Write the answer and one trait or characteristic of the theatre style in support of your answer. Theatre Style and/or Trait/characteristic Photo #1: Pageant wagon actors performed miracle Medieval theatre plays on moveable stage wagons Photo #2: theatre built on hillside _________________________ ____________________ ____________________ ____________________ How Theatre Began (video) – Nancy Forderer SDAIE strategy: Send-A- Problem – Using the text, each student on a team makes up a review question and writes it on a 3X5 card. The writer asks the question of the other members of the team. When everyone agrees on an answer, it is written on the back of the card. The teams then send their review question to another team. Teams respond by having one student read the first question. Each team member writes down answer. Team members then compare and discuss their answer. If they agree, they turn the card over to see if they concur with the sending team. If not, they write their answer on the back of the card as an alternate answer. A second student reads the next question, and so on. The cycle continues. At the end, teacher should provide an opportunity to discuss and clarify questions and answers.
  25. 25. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 25 Component Strand: AESTHETIC VALUING Standard: 4.0 Students critique and derive meaning from works of theatre, film/video, electronic media, and theatrical artists on the basis of aesthetic qualities. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 4.1 Design and apply, appropriate criteria or rubrics for evaluating the effective use of masks, puppetry, makeup, and costumes in a theatrical presentation. None Aesthetic Aesthetic appreciation Aesthetic perception Authentic evaluation Criteria Critique Constructive Criticism Rubric Range: Acquisition: Proficient: Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Quiz • Test Match the definition on the left to the correct term on the right. Write the letter of your choice in the space provided to the left. 1. ____ evaluation guidelines applied a. evaluation in judging a performance 2. ____ an evaluation involving real-life b. critique situations and role-playing to test skills and abilities for the real world c. criteria 3. ____ an assessment of strengths and d. authentic weaknesses evaluation 4. ____ opinions and comments based on predetermined criteria Exploring theatre – Nancy Prince & Jeanie Jackson Paper Masks and Puppets for Stories, Songs, and Plays – Ron and Marsha Feller Make A Mask Instruction Guide – Sander Johnson, Tim Murphy, Patricia Ryan, Sarka, Anne de la Sota Cut and Make Masks – A .G. Smith and Josie Hazen The Usborne Book of Masks – Ray Gibson Teacher constructed quiz/test Pictures or photos of masks Cooperative Learning Class discussion In text questions SDAIE strategy: Pair/share
  26. 26. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 26 Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) • Having learned the essential vocabulary • Having been assigned a character from a fairy tale (or other source) to design a mask for • Having designed a mask • The student will develop a rubric for evaluating the effectiveness of a mask (puppetry, makeup, or costume) in a theatrical presentation. You and your partner will brainstorm and develop a rubric for evaluating the effectiveness of a mask in a theatrical presentation. Sample Rubrics Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Students will apply their rubric to evaluate the effectiveness of their partner’s mask in a theatrical presentation of a fairy tale or other teacher selected presentation (e.g. pantomime) You will apply the rubric you created in evaluating the effectiveness of your partner’s mask in their theatrical presentation. Notes:
  27. 27. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 27 Component Strand: CONNECTIONS, RELATIONSHIPS, APPLICATIONS Standard: 5.0 Students apply what they learn in theatre, film/video, and electronic media across subject areas. They develop competencies and creative skills in problem solving, communication, and time management that contribute to lifelong learning and career skills. They also learn about careers in and related to theatre. Objective Prerequisites Essential Vocabulary Typical Time Range Performance Standard 5.2 Demonstrate projection, vocal variety, diction, gesture, and confidence in an oral presentation. None Diction Diaphragm Flexibility Gesture Inflection Pitch Poise Projection Pronunciation Quality Rate Vocal expression Range: Acquisition: Proficient:
  28. 28. Drama, Introduction The typical time ranges reflect estimated times needed to teach the objective to mastery. Times may need to be modified, depending on student needs. © 2006 Sweetwater Union High School District Revised on: July 15, 2008 28 Assessment and Practice Format Specifications Sample Assessment Suggested Instructional Resources Possible Instructional Strategies/Activities for Objective Multiple Choice • Quiz • Test Read each definition carefully and match it to the correct term. 1. ____ The shaping and molding of a. poise sounds into syllables b. articulation 2. ____ The speed at which you speak c. rate 3. ____ The effective control of all voice elements and body movements Exploring Theatre Prince & Jeanine Jackson Teacher constructed quiz/test Lecture Cornell Note taking In Text Questions Vocal drills, exercises, and activities Cooperative Learning Students identify careers that require effective oral and communication skills Formative Assessment (Constructed or Performance) • Given a selection of monologues from which to choose from for a presentation • Having analyzed their script, focusing on line interpretation • The student will provide notations on their script addressing mood, emotion, and attitude of character. Student will also underline operative words that are to be given emphasis You will provide notations on your monologue addressing mood, emotion, and attitude of character. You will indicate the operative words by underlining words to be given emphasis. Script work: line analysis Pair/share peer Summative Assessment (Authentic/Real World Performance) • Given a selection of monologues from which to choose for a presentation • Having analyzed their monologue, focusing on line interpretation • Instructed to provide notations on the student selected monologue • The student will perform their memorized monologue, demonstrating appropriate projection levels, vocal expression, diction, gesture, and poise as a result of their line and character analysis You will perform a monologue of your choosing, demonstrating appropriate projection levels, vocal variety, diction, gesture, and confidence. Teacher provided monologues for student selection Exploring Theatre Teacher’s Source Binder (reproducible monologue exercises) – Nancy Prince & Jeanie Jackson Teenage Mouth (monologues)– Roger Karshner Teens Have Feelings, Too! (monologues) - Deborah Karczewski

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