Routine Writing:   Teaching & Assessing Common Core Writing                 with Six Traits                               ...
The Writing Process1Writing is a way of learning. This process is “a valuable tool for learning for all students in allsub...
Common Core’s 10 Anchor Standards for WritingTASK:   Place a check mark () next to the standards with which you feel com...
Six Traits of Writing   1.   Ideas: the content of the writing; the main message and meaning   2.   Organization: the fram...
Stephen King’s Guide to Movie Snacks       For a magazine that prides itself on the many aspects of the moviebusiness it c...
substance squeezed from the sweat glands of small animals, but I have developedsuch a taste for it over my years of filmgo...
Lookin’ GoodBy Danielle B., Deer Creek HS sophomore, Class of 2011        For a gender that thinks oh so highly of itself,...
six inches of floss from the container and gently push the thin string between eachtooth; I know this is time consuming, b...
Writing Modes in Common CoreIn each of the following boxes, write down any writing prompts, activities, or assignments tha...
ArgumentsSometimes I have my students grade themselves before I grade them. They already know whatthe rubric looks like be...
The Opportunity Gap                  Source: David Brooks | The New York Times | July 9, 2012         http://www.nytimes.c...
nonsporting activities, like theater, yearbook and scouting. They are much more likely to attendreligious services.       ...
Bike Riding 101: a Fable about Teaching WritingBy Jason Stephenson        One summer morning when school was a distant tho...
Before the teachers arrived at the oak tree, they could hear the experienced teacher’sheavy breathing. Once closer, they c...
Oklahoma Writing ProjectWhat is the Oklahoma Writing Project?The Oklahoma Writing Project, an affiliate of the National Wr...
WORKS CITED6 TraitsCulham, Ruth. 6 + 1 Traits of Writing: the Complete Guide. New York, NY: Scholastic, 2003.---. 6 + 1 Tr...
OWP Workshop ReflectionOWP Teacher Consultant: Jason Stephenson              Date: July 24, 2012   School: HintonTitle of ...
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Routine Writing

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Teaching & Assessing Common Writing with Six Traits (an Oklahoma Writing Project presentation)

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Routine Writing

  1. 1. Routine Writing: Teaching & Assessing Common Core Writing with Six Traits Hinton Public Schools 8:30am—12noon; 1:00pm—3:30pm | July 24, 2012 The advent of Common Core State Standards impacts teachers of all core subjects in that their students are now expected to write at a level of preparedness for college and career readiness. Through an examination of the writing strand of CCSS and the recursive writing process, teachers will experience writing activities geared toward engaging students in writing aligned with CCSS. Using the six traits, teachers will identify and assess elements of good writing. Jason Stephenson Twitter: @teacherman82 stephenson.jason@gmail.com stephensonj@deercreek.k12.ok.us Deer Creek High School  6101 NW 206th  Edmond, OK 73012  (405) 348-6100 Downloads: http://www.slideshare.net/teacherman82 Jeannine Rainbolt College of Education  University of Oklahoma 338 Cate Center Drive, Room 190 Norman, OK 73019-7441 (405) 325-3534  http://owp.ou.eduOklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 1
  2. 2. The Writing Process1Writing is a way of learning. This process is “a valuable tool for learning for all students in allsubject areas at all ages.” While writing to learn, students discover connections, describeprocesses, express emerging understandings, raise questions, and find answers. Writinginstruction should encourage whole pieces of writing for real purposes and real audiences.Writing is recursive and has five stages: prewriting, drafting, revising, editing, and publishing.These stages do not always take place in sequential order. For example, a writer may draft awork and revise it at the same time, and then do more prewriting. After publishing, a writer canstill return to the work and revise and edit it. If writing were a runner, it would be more like theEnergizer Bunny than a sprinter.Prewriting is the process that helps writers get ready to write. Students gather ideas andorganize them. Prewriting should take more time than any other stage in the process. Activitiesmay include class discussion, reading, predicting, remembering, word banks, observing,thinking, student notebooks, drawing, free writing, modeling, clustering or webbing, cubing, andbrainstorming.Drafting is putting ideas down on paper with a focus on content, and begins with notes or ideasgenerated during prewriting. The first draft may be kept in a journal, writer’s notebook, writingcenter, or on a computer. During this stage, students are encouraged to simply get their ideasdown on paper, without worry about grammar, spelling, or punctuation. Perfectionist studentstend to revise and edit as they draft.Revising, which means “to see again,” is refining of content, not mechanics. Students can reviseby adding, deleting, substituting, or rearranging the material. When students see their writingwith fresh eyes through the help of peers or a teacher, revision is much easier.Editing is cleaning up errors in conventions. Positive reinforcement is more effective thancorrective comments to improve the quality of writing. Peer editing in writing groups helps teachand reinforce proofreading skills. Students locate and correct errors in punctuation,capitalization, spelling, usage, and sentence structure so that errors in conventions do notinterfere with a reader’s ability to understand the message. Teachers who correct everymechanical error on a student’s piece should save their time and sanity by simply drawing a dotat the end of each line where an error occurred. Students can then find their own mistakes.Publishing the student’s work is essential to the composing process. Publication provides anopportunity for the writer’s product to be shared with and/or evaluated by the intended audienceor reader in general. An authentic audience, one with whom the students want to communicate, isnecessary for effective writing. Students can publish by reading their writing to their friends,sharing it with the class, posting it on a blog or wall, including it in a class book, etc.1 Taken and modified from the Oklahoma State Department of Education.http://sde.state.ok.us/Curriculum/PASS/Grade/langarts.pdfOklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 2
  3. 3. Common Core’s 10 Anchor Standards for WritingTASK:  Place a check mark () next to the standards with which you feel comfortable.  Place a circle () next to any standards for which you need help.  Place a star () next to the most difficult standard.Text Types and Purposes 1. Write arguments to support claims in an analysis of substantive topics or texts, using valid reasoning and relevant and sufficient evidence. 2. Write informative/explanatory texts to examine and convey complex ideas and information clearly and accurately through the effective selection, organization, and analysis of content. 3. Write narratives to develop real or imagined experiences or events using effective technique, well-chosen details, and well-structured event sequences.Production and Distribution of Writing 4. Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development, organization, and style are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. 5. Develop and strengthen writing as needed by planning, revising, editing, rewriting, or trying a new approach. 6. Use technology, including the Internet, to produce and publish writing and to interact and collaborate with others.Research to Build and Present Knowledge 7. Conduct short as well as more sustained research projects based on focused questions, demonstrating understanding of the subject under investigation. 8. Gather relevant information from multiple print and digital sources, assess the credibility and accuracy of each source, and integrate the information while avoiding plagiarism. 9. Draw evidence from literary or informational texts to support analysis, reflection, and research.Range of Writing 10. Write routinely over extended time frames (time for research, reflection, and revision) and shorter time frames (a single sitting or a day or two) for a range of tasks, purposes, and audiences.Oklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 3
  4. 4. Six Traits of Writing 1. Ideas: the content of the writing; the main message and meaning 2. Organization: the framework or structure of the piece 3. Voice: the writer’s personality demonstrated through stylistic choices 4. Word Choice: specific, intentional vocabulary 5. Sentence Fluency: the fluidity (variability and smoothness) of sentences 6. Conventions: grammar, mechanics, spelling, paragraphing, etc. * Presentation: the overall appearance of the work Ideas Organization Voice Word Choice Sentence Fluency Conventions PresentationOklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 4
  5. 5. Stephen King’s Guide to Movie Snacks For a magazine that prides itself on the many aspects of the moviebusiness it covers, Entertainment Weekly hasn’t had much to say over the yearsconcerning the important subject of snacks. Oh, an occasional piece about howmuch they cost, but few words on their culinary wonderfulness. This needscorrecting, because, while some people eat snacks while they are at the movies,there are some who go to the movies so they can eat snacks. That would be me.So let me impart a few lessons years of snacking have taught me. First, support your theater. Buy at the snack bar and damn the expense.You could probably sneak your own food in, but if you’re caught, you’ll bethrown out. As for bringing healthier snacks from home: Did you really hire ababysitter and drive six miles so you could snark cucumber slices half-drowned inbuttermilk ranch out of a slimy plastic bag? Is that what you call living it up? If you want to get healthy, there are places for that: They’re called “healthclubs.” And I find there’s something giddy about tossing down $4.50 for a box ofGummi Bears or a bag of chocolate raisins. It makes me feel like a high roller,especially when the matinee ticket itself only costs 50 cents more. I always start my order with the ritual drink — Diet Pepsi if possible,Coke Zero as a fallback, Diet Coke the court of last resort. A big diet cola sops upthe calories and cholesterol contained in movie snack food just like a big oldsponge soaks up water. This is a proven fact. One expert (me) believes a mediumdiet cola drink can lower your cholesterol by 20 points and absorb as much as onethousand empty calories. And if you say that’s total crap, I would just point out Idon’t call it a ritual drink for nothing. Sometimes I add a strawberry smoothiewith lots of whipped cream, but I’m always sure to take enough sips of my ritualdrink to absolve me of those calories, too. With my calorie-absorbent drink in hand, I can then safely order a largepopcorn with extra butter. Of course it isn’t really butter, it’s some sort of mysteryOklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 5
  6. 6. substance squeezed from the sweat glands of small animals, but I have developedsuch a taste for it over my years of filmgoing that the real stuff tastes wrong,somehow. If the counter guy puts on the glandular butter substitute himself, I watchcarefully to make sure he greases the middle of the bag as well as the top layer. Ifit’s self-serve (at the beginning I didn’t like this option, but now I do), I proceedto hammer on that red button until I have what I call a “heavy bag.” You knowyou have a heavy bag when the bottom starts to sag and ooze large drops of ayellow puslike substance before you even get into the theater. And don’t forgetthe salt. Popcorn salt is a little strong for my taste (and it looks like powderedurine); I prefer plain table salt. Half a shaker is about right. With a “heavy bag,” caution is a must. Don’t put it on your lap; when themovie’s over and the lights come up, people will think you wet your pants.Courtesy is also a must. Don’t put it on the seat beside you, or the next person isgoing to sit on a seat that oozes. Not cool, bro. My candy of choice is Junior Mints. And while I don’t bring bootleg foodinto the movies, I do bring bootleg toothpicks. Then, as I relax in my seat, I take atoothpick and poke five or six Junior Mints onto it. It ends the dreaded ChocolateHand, and it’s also kind of fun to eat candy off a stick. I call them Mint-Kebabs. And although it’s a matter of personal choice, I myself don’t eat moviemeat (go on, snicker, I can take it). My motto is “Never buy a hot dog that’s beenwaiting in a foil Baggie under a heat lamp.” For all you know, that stray dogcould have been there since Revenge of the Sith. Nachos are good, but only if youget the reserve swimming pool of cheese sauce, because one is never enough.Now that I think of it, the same could be said of snacks. But remember: Start withthe ritual drink. After that, you’re on your own.Oklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 6
  7. 7. Lookin’ GoodBy Danielle B., Deer Creek HS sophomore, Class of 2011 For a gender that thinks oh so highly of itself, the male sex seems to belacking basic knowledge. I understand you like girls, and that’s about your onlythought. However, to get what you want, it takes hard work. Girls as a whole wanta well groomed and put together man. You cannot expect females to flock to youif you smell like McDonalds and appear to have just awoken from a coma. So dothe female gender a favor please, and spend a few minutes making yourselvespresentable for dates with your girlfriend or crush. The first step in this seemingly impossible process is to bathe. Please, dearGod, bathe. I don’t care what the commercials say; you cannot simply douseyourself in body spray. Once in the shower, locate the shampoo, and squeeze agenerous amount into your hand. Lather your hair, short or long, and rinse. If it’sbeen awhile since you last showered, feel free to lather again once or twice. Oncethe water runs clear, use the conditioner (it’s the stuff that’s thicker thanshampoo) and put a small amount into your hair to prevent tangles. Before yourinse, use soap and wash your body, including your feet. Rinse off in warm waterand proceed to rinse your hair. Once free of residue, dry off and prepare to shave. Being between the ages of thirteen and nineteen, I doubt you look asattractive and manly as you think you do with facial hair, so get rid of it. Whenyou go in for that first kiss on your date, you don’t want her feeling like she justgot attacked by sandpaper. Carefully shave, avoiding nicks and cuts. Rinse offexcess shaving cream. Once your face is clean, it’s time to move to oral hygiene. Brushing and flossing your teeth, though apparently strenuous activities,are necessities. Nothing is quite as big of a turn off as bad breath. Remove aboutOklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 7
  8. 8. six inches of floss from the container and gently push the thin string between eachtooth; I know this is time consuming, but you can do it! Next, apply a generousamount of toothpaste to a dampened toothbrush and begin scrubbing your teeth.Keep brushing. More. Do not stop until it has been a full two minutes. If you’refeelin’ really crazy, you could even rinse with mouthwash. Now that we’vetackled from the clean-shaven neck-up, it is time to address the neck-down. When deciding what to wear, stop trying to match to the point that youend up in orange shorts and an OSU orange shirt. Blue on blue and red on red arealso generally a bad idea. Shorts and a t-shirt are a great option depending on theoccasion, but generally it’s acceptable and makes you seem comfortable aroundher. If going the jeans route, wear a belt. As awesome as your seahorse boxersare, I don’t want to see seven inches of them. Once dressed, style your hair asusual and put on deodorant. Seeing as the girl you’re trying to impress is likelyshorter than you, you don’t want her gagging when you put your arm around her. For the final touch, make sure your hands are presentable. Your nailsshould be clean and not overgrown. If the skin on your knuckles is beginning tocrack, I would suggest lotion. Don’t worry: there are some odorless lotions on themarket. After a final look in the mirror, retrieve your wallet including yourmoney, driver’s license, and anything else you’ll need. A well groomed andprepared man is sure to sweep any girl off of her feet. However, once you’re outof the door, you’re on your own. “What to Say to a Woman to Keep Her Semi-Interested in You” is a whole different paper.Oklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 8
  9. 9. Writing Modes in Common CoreIn each of the following boxes, write down any writing prompts, activities, or assignments thatyou currently use in your classroom. Which modes, if any, need improvement in yourclassroom? Argument Informational/Explanatory Narrative Blending of the 3 GenresOklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 9
  10. 10. ArgumentsSometimes I have my students grade themselves before I grade them. They already know whatthe rubric looks like before they turn in their essay. I ask them to evaluate each aspect of theirwriting using the left rubric. When I grade, I use the right rubric. By comparing the student’sself-analysis with my own assessment, I can see how well they can analyze their own writing.PERSUASIVE ESSAY RUBRIC PERSUASIVE ESSAY RUBRIC Great 3 (A) Great 3 (A) Good 2 (B) Good 2 (B) Okay 1 (C) Okay 1 (C) Missing 0 (F) Missing 0 (F) Criteria Score Criteria Score Title Title MLA formatting MLA formatting Thesis Thesis Authority / Ethos Authority / Ethos Logic / Logos Logic / Logos Personal Appeal / Pathos Personal Appeal / Pathos Rhetorical Question Rhetorical Question Order of Arguments Order of Arguments Concession Concession Rebuttal Rebuttal Signal phrase Signal phrase Direct quote Direct quote Paraphrase Paraphrase Grammar Grammar Works Cited Works Cited Total (out of 45 points) Total (out of 45 points)Name ______________________________ Name ______________________________Oklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 10
  11. 11. The Opportunity Gap Source: David Brooks | The New York Times | July 9, 2012 http://www.nytimes.com/2012/07/10/opinion/brooks-the-opportunity-gap.htmlInstructions: Over the past few months, writers from Charles Murray to Timothy Noah have producedalarming work on the growing bifurcation of American society. Now the eminent Harvardpolitical scientist Robert Putnam and his team are coming out with research that’s morehorrifying. While most studies look at inequality of outcomes among adults and help us understandhow America is coming apart, Putnam’s group looked at inequality of opportunities amongchildren. They help us understand what the country will look like in the decades ahead. Thequick answer? More divided than ever. Putnam’s data verifies what many of us have seen anecdotally, that the children of themore affluent and less affluent are raised in starkly different ways and have differentopportunities. Decades ago, college-graduate parents and high-school-graduate parents investedsimilarly in their children. Recently, more affluent parents have invested much more in theirchildren’s futures while less affluent parents have not. They’ve invested more time. Over the past decades, college-educated parents havequadrupled the amount of time they spend reading “Goodnight Moon,” talking to their kids abouttheir day and cheering them on from the sidelines. High-school-educated parents have increasedchild-care time, but only slightly. A generation ago, working-class parents spent slightly more time with their kids thancollege-educated parents. Now college-educated parents spend an hour more every day. Thisattention gap is largest in the first three years of life when it is most important. Affluent parents also invest more money in their children. Over the last 40 years upper-income parents have increased the amount they spend on their kids’ enrichment activities, liketutoring and extra curriculars, by $5,300 a year. The financially stressed lower classes have onlybeen able to increase their investment by $480, adjusted for inflation. As a result, behavior gaps are opening up. In 1972, kids from the bottom quartile ofearners participated in roughly the same number of activities as kids from the top quartile.Today, it’s a chasm. Richer kids are roughly twice as likely to play after-school sports. They are more thantwice as likely to be the captains of their sports teams. They are much more likely to do
  12. 12. nonsporting activities, like theater, yearbook and scouting. They are much more likely to attendreligious services. It’s not only that richer kids have become more active. Poorer kids have become morepessimistic and detached. Social trust has fallen among all income groups, but, between 1975and 1995, it plummeted among the poorest third of young Americans and has remained low eversince. As Putnam writes in notes prepared for the Aspen Ideas Festival: “It’s perfectlyunderstandable that kids from working-class backgrounds have become cynical and evenparanoid, for virtually all our major social institutions have failed them — family, friends,church, school and community.” As a result, poorer kids are less likely to participate in voluntaryservice work that might give them a sense of purpose and responsibility. Their test scores arelagging. Their opportunities are more limited. A long series of cultural, economic and social trends have merged to create this sad stateof affairs. Traditional social norms were abandoned, meaning more children are born out ofwedlock. Their single parents simply have less time and resources to prepare them for a morecompetitive world. Working-class jobs were decimated, meaning that many parents are toostressed to have the energy, time or money to devote to their children. Affluent, intelligent people are now more likely to marry other energetic, intelligentpeople. They raise energetic, intelligent kids in self-segregated, cultural ghettoes where theyknow little about and have less influence upon people who do not share their blessings. The political system directs more money to health care for the elderly while spending onchild welfare slides. Equal opportunity, once core to the nation’s identity, is now a tertiary concern. IfAmerica really wants to change that, if the country wants to take advantage of all its humancapital rather than just the most privileged two-thirds of it, then people are going to have to makesome pretty uncomfortable decisions. Liberals are going to have to be willing to champion norms that say marriage shouldcome before childrearing and be morally tough about it. Conservatives are going to have to bewilling to accept tax increases or benefit cuts so that more can be spent on the earned-income taxcredit and other programs that benefit the working class. Political candidates will have to spend less time trying to exploit class divisions and moretime trying to remedy them — less time calling their opponents out of touch elitists, and moretime coming up with agendas that comprehensively address the problem. It’s politically tough todo that, but the alternative is national suicide.Writer’s Notebook Topics:
  13. 13. Bike Riding 101: a Fable about Teaching WritingBy Jason Stephenson One summer morning when school was a distant thought, a group of teachers gathered todiscuss a problem they were all facing: Their students still could not ride bikes well. “I don’t know why they keep falling off,” said one teacher. “I made them learn all theterms assigned to our grade. They know brake and chain and shifter.” “Vocabulary isn’t the only answer,” said another teacher. “Sometimes I show videos ofpeople riding bikes. I think that’s been helpful. Still, I think there’s room for improvement.” “My middle school students aren’t ready to ride bikes yet,” said one teacher. “We talkabout what bikes they want to ride, and we research different kinds of bikes, just like thecurriculum says.” “In freshman year, the students are still getting used to high school,” said the only maleteacher. “I try to ease them in by having them draw pictures of bikes. Later on, we do the bigproject. Students have to take a bike apart and put it back together. That’s always a big hit.” “When they are sophomores, they obviously need to get a lot of feedback on their bikeriding abilities. I hate all the grading, but that’s the only way they’ll learn to ride a bike.” “So how does grading work for you?” asked the new teacher. “Well, I have students record themselves riding a bike, and then they email the video tome. I have to watch their techniques and tell them what they’re doing wrong. They make somany careless mistakes. It’s like they don’t even know the basics.” “I have a silly question,” said the new teacher. “Can everyone here ride a bike?” “Huh!” scoffed the oldest teacher. “I’ve been teaching students how to ride a bike forover twenty-five years. Of course I can ride a bike.” “Then let’s see,” said the new teacher. “I rode my bike to this meeting. Let’s go out to theparking lot. You have lots of experience, so we’ll watch you ride. Maybe we’re missingsomething.” The experienced teacher looked surprised, but she didn’t say anything. The rest of theteachers agreed that a riding experiment might be helpful in finding new ways to teach bikeriding. Near the entrance to the school, a shiny red bike was chained to the bike rack. The newteacher removed the chain and handed her helmet to the experienced teacher. “Oh, helmets are very important in bike riding,” said one of the middle school teachers.“We spend a six-week unit on helmets. I even have my students design their own helmets as aculminating activity.” The experienced teacher examined the helmet, but didn’t put it on. “I’m not reallydressed appropriately for bike riding,” she said. “I really ought to be wearing a better pair ofshorts, and my shoes are kind of old.” “Nonsense!” the male teacher said. “If you won’t ride it, I will.” Upon hearing that challenge, the experienced teacher swung her leg over the bike, satdown on the seat, and snapped on the helmet. She flipped the kickstand up with the heel of hershoe and pushed the pedals up and down. The other teachers clapped and cheered as she snakedacross the parking lot, but she soon stopped in the shade of the big oak tree. “What’s wrong?” one of the teachers shouted. “Nothing,” the teacher called back, but she remained motionless. “Let’s go see what’s going on,” the new teacher said.Oklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 13
  14. 14. Before the teachers arrived at the oak tree, they could hear the experienced teacher’sheavy breathing. Once closer, they could see beads of sweat dripping down her brow. Her facewas red. It was obvious that she had not ridden a bike in a long time. No one wanted toembarrass her, so they thanked her for sharing her ability. “It’s very hot today. Let’s go back inside. I miss the air conditioning,” said the newteacher. She was beginning to realize something. Back in the classroom, the teachers sat back down in a circle. The experienced teacherfanned herself with a piece of paper. “It’s a good thing we have the summer off,” she said. “Ourstudents could not ride bikes in this heat.” “They would need to stay hydrated if they did,” the male teacher said. “Are there any other teaching strategies we use?” asked the new teacher. “I’ve heard youall discuss terms, research, projects, grading, and videos of bike riders. Have I missed anything?” “I don’t think so,” said one teacher. “And with the new state curriculum arriving nextyear, students will be expected to be even better bike riders. They’ll have to learn how to pop awheelie! That’s some really advanced bike riding.” “I have an idea,” said the new teacher. “What?” asked the teacher to her left. “How about we let our students ride bikes during class time? They can’t become betterbike riders if they aren’t riding bikes.” “But that would take away from class time,” one teacher said. “How am I supposed toteach all the terms if they’re riding bikes all the time?” “And how am I supposed to grade all their riding?” said another teacher. “I’m alreadyoverwhelmed with the grading I already do. I can’t imagine what it would be like it they rodetheir bikes every day.” “If they ride, they might get hurt, even while wearing helmets,” said the experiencedteacher. “What if our school gets sued?” “Where would we store all their bikes?” asked the male teacher. “Our parking lot is notvery big. Where would we get the money to purchase all the bike racks that we need?” The new teacher listened patiently to all these questions. She now understood whystudents could not ride bikes well at the end of high school. She wondered how her colleagueswould respond when during the first week of school she took her students out to the parking lotand coached them in their bike riding abilities.Oklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 14
  15. 15. Oklahoma Writing ProjectWhat is the Oklahoma Writing Project?The Oklahoma Writing Project, an affiliate of the National Writing Project, is a network ofteachers dedicated to improving the quality of composition instruction in elementary andsecondary schools. Founded in 1978, the Oklahoma Writing Project has over 175 in-service titlesavailable for schools across the state. In fact, the 250 teacher consultants with OWP have heldover 5,000 workshops for teachers. The Oklahoma Writing Project is sponsored by theUniversity of Oklahoma, the College of Education, the National Writing Project, the StateRegents for Higher Education, and the State Department of Education.How can you become an OWP Teacher Consultant?If you are interested in becoming certified as a teacher consultant for the Oklahoma WritingProject, you must first participate in the three-week Invitational Summer Institute at theUniversity of Oklahoma. Participants must submit an application including samples of studentwriting and go through an interview process. Please contact Priscilla Griffith, Director of OWP(pgriffith@ou.edu), or Audra Plummer, Co-Director of Inservice (owpcodirector@yahoo.com).Check the OWP website (http://owp.ou.edu) for details on registration.Where do some OWP teacher consultants teach? • Moore • Noble • Norman • Fletcher • Putnam City • Chickasha • Deer Creek • Oakdale • Wagoner • Shawnee • Lawton • Tecumseh • Midwest City • Elgin • Dickson • Bishop McGuiness • Mid-Del • All Saints Catholic School (Norman) • BlanchardOklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 15
  16. 16. WORKS CITED6 TraitsCulham, Ruth. 6 + 1 Traits of Writing: the Complete Guide. New York, NY: Scholastic, 2003.---. 6 + 1 Traits of Writing: the Complete Guide for the Primary Grades. New York, NY: Scholastic, 2005.---. Using Picture Books to Teach Writing with the Traits. New York, NY: Scholastic, 2004.Spandel, Vicki. Creating Writers: through 6-Trait Writing Assessment and Instruction, 3rd ed. New York, NY: Addison Wesley Longman, 2001.“Six Trait Analytic Writing Rubric.” Arizona Department of Education. Web. 22 July 2012. <http://www.azed.gov/standards-development-assessment/six-traits>.“Writing Traits.” Writing Fix, 2011. Web. 22 July 2012. <http://writingfix.com/Traits.htm>.“6+1 Traits of Writing.” LiveBinders, 22 June 2011. Web. 22 July 2012. <http://www.livebinders.com/play/play_or_edit?id=126365>.“6+1 Trait® Rubrics (aka Scoring Guides).” Education Northwest, 2012. Web. 22 July 2012 < http://educationnorthwest.org/resource/464>.Writing InstructionAnderson, Jeff. Everyday Editing: Inviting Students to Develop Skill and Craft in Writer’s Workshop. Portland, ME: Stenhouse, 2007.Gallagher, Kelly. Write Like This: Teaching Real-World Writing Through Modeling & Mentor Texts. Portland, ME: Stenhouse, 2011.Kittle, Penny. Write Beside Them: Risk, Voice, and Clarity in High School Writing. Portsmouth, NH: Heinneman, 2008.Rief, Linda. 100 Quickwrites. New York: Scholastic Teaching Resources, 2003.ExemplarsKing, Stephen. “Stephen King’s Guide to Movie Snacks.” Entertainment Weekly. 27 July 2008. Web. 22 July 2012. <http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20215177,00.html>.Stein, David Ezra. Interrupting Chicken. New York, NY: Scholastic, 2010.Reading InstructionGallagher, Kelly. Readicide: How Schools are Killing Reading and What You Can do about it. Portland, ME: Stenhouse, 2009.Jago, Carol. With Rigor For All: Meeting Common Core Standards for Reading Literature. Portsmouth, NH: Heinemann, 2011.Miller, Donalyn. The Book Whisperer: Awakening the Inner Reader in Every Child. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass, 2009.Tovani, Cris. So What Do They Really Know?: Assessment That Informs Teaching and Learning. Portland, ME: Stenhouse, 2011.Oklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 16
  17. 17. OWP Workshop ReflectionOWP Teacher Consultant: Jason Stephenson Date: July 24, 2012 School: HintonTitle of Presentation:Routine Writing: Teaching & Assessing Common Core Writing with 6 TraitsOn a scale of 5-1 (5 = excellent, 3 = average, 1 = poor), please evaluate the following: Clarity of objectives 5 4 3 2 1 Writing Process Explanation 5 4 3 2 1 Writing activities 5 4 3 2 1 Student samples 5 4 3 2 1 Handouts / Packet 5 4 3 2 1 Works Cited 5 4 3 2 1 Knowledge / Research 5 4 3 2 1 Audience involvement 5 4 3 2 1 Relevance to my classroom 5 4 3 2 1 OWP Explanation 5 4 3 2 1The most important thing I got from this presentation was....You did a good job of...If you present to other audiences, consider...._____Yes, please send my school information about the OWP Summer Institute.________________________________________ __________________________________Printed Name (optional) Name of School (optional)Oklahoma Writing Project 2012 Jason Stephenson 17

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