Gcse revision guide

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Gcse revision guide

  1. 1. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Name: Target Grade: Yr 10 Points Score Grad e Yr 11 Points Score Grade Add your points score together to get your overall Coursework Points score. Coursework Grades (60% of your GCSE) TOTAL: GRADE NEEDED: Look at the grade boundaries below, work out the difference between your COURSEWORK POINTS SCORE and the points needed for your TARGET GRADE. A* A B C D 360 320 280 240 200 With this final number, you now know what grade you need in the exam (boundaries shown below) to achieve your target grade. A* A B C D E F 64 14 4 5 8 128 52 112 47 96 40 80 33 64 26 48
  2. 2. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A- Lifestyle Magazines Section A is all about lifestyle magazines and you will be required to analyse an UNSEEN extract. This means that you will be given a lifestyle magazine front cover, contents and editors letter to use in the exam. YOU HAVE UP TO 30 MINS TO READ AND WRITE NOTE ON THE EXTRACT. USE THIS TIME WISELY! Q1 - CONVENTIONS Question 1 is always the same and asks you to explain about 2 conventions of a lifestyle magazine. LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE CONVENTIONS 1. A Model or a Celeb on the front cover looking at the audience. 2. Aspirational tone to the stories and language (Life a lifestyle coach) 3. Mix of Content (Beauty, Health, Fashion, Sex etc) 4. Direct Mode of Address (As if the stories are directed at you. Cover lines use YOU or YOUR.) YOU ONLY NEED 2 SO USE THESE 2. EXPLAIN THEM USING SPECIFIC EXAMPLES FROM THE UNSEEN
  3. 3. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines Q1 - CONVENTIONS EXEMPLAR The magazine „Men‟s Health‟ fits the lifestyle genre because it has the conventional mix of contents; celebrity, health, fashion, sex, advice, and (specific to men‟s mags) gadgets. This mix of contents is clear from the front cover; „Sex Tricks‟, „Weight Loss‟, „and „Man Flu Defeated‟. Also from the two pages of contents; „Style‟, The Joy of Decks‟, „Shocking Fillers‟, „What are you Eating?‟ and „Your Winning Game Plan‟. The best example is on the Editor‟s Page, „The faster way to a better life‟ which tells you how to navigate the magazine using „quick navigation icons‟. The magazine also fits the „lifestyle‟ genre because it assumes the position of advisor. It uses direct address to „speak‟ to the reader as though it holds all the answers for „your‟ life to be a success. The coverlines clearly indicate this position, „LOSE YOUR GUT!‟ and „Crush Your Hangover, Build Muscle‟ are two examples here. Level 4 (8–10 marks) Explains two conventions Shows thorough understanding of appropriate generic conventions Ideas and arguments supported by evidence Precise and accurate use of terminology Ideas expressed clearly and fluently. Level 3 (6–7 marks) States two conventions Shows sound understanding of appropriate generic conventions Offers sound textual evidence Some accurate use of terminology Ideas expressed with some clarity and fluency Level 2 (3–5 marks) States at least one convention Shows some understanding of generic conventions Offers some textual evidence Limited use of terminology Simple ideas expressed appropriately. errors of SPaG that obscure meaning. Level 1 (0–2 marks) Describes some aspects of the text Shows minimal understanding of generic conventions No, minimal or inaccurate use of terminology Writing may also lack legibility. Mark Scheme
  4. 4. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines Q2 - FEATURES Question 2 is, again, always the same and asks you to explain HOW layout, typography, colour and language CREATE EFFECT. LAYOUT Symmetrical (Formal) Balance Symmetrical balance is mirror image balance. If you draw a line down the center of the page, all the objects on one side of the screen are mirrored on the other side (they may not be identical objects, but they are similar in terms of numbers of objects, colors and other elements.) Asymmetrical (informal) Balance Asymmetrical balance occurs when several smaller items on one side are balanced by a large item on the other side, or smaller items are placed further away from the center of the screen than larger items. One darker item may need to be balanced by several lighter items. An unbalanced page or screen creates a feeling of tension, as if the page or screen might tip, or things might slide off the side, just as the unbalanced balance beam would tip to one side.
  5. 5. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines Balance by colour: Our eyes are drawn by color. Small areas of vibrant color can be used to balance larger areas of more neutral colors. Balance by Value: Value refers to the darkness or lightness of objects. Black against white has a much stronger contrast than gray against white. To balance these two colors, you would need a larger area of gray to balance the stronger value of black. Large flat areas without much detail can be balanced by smaller irregularly shaped objects since the eye is led towards the more intricate shape. Balance by position: Using a balance beam, a larger weight closer to the center point can be balanced by a lighter weight further away from the center. This is the basis for balance by position. Sometimes larger elements on one side of the page can be balanced by a smaller element that is positioned by itself at the far end of the other side of the page. This is a very tricky type of asymmetrical balance that often ends up looking out of balance. Balance by texture: Smaller areas with interesting textures (variegated light and dark, or random fluctuations) can balance larger areas with smoother, untextured looks. Balance by Eye Direction: Your eye can be led to a certain point in a picture depending on how the elements are arranged. If the people in a picture are looking in a certain direction, your eye will be led there as well. Elements in a picture, such as triangles or arrows, will also lead your eye to look to a certain point and maintain the balance of a picture.
  6. 6. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines LAYOUT Masthead (logo) The name of the magazine displayed in a specific typeface. This is the visual branding of the title and is often done in a specially designed typeface to be very recognizable and unique. Dateline Month and year of publication, often with the price. Main image In the case of this front cover there is a single image of the model Shania. The image is used in a classic way, the face is big enough to stand out on the news-stand, with the model making full eye-contact. The image on a magazine‟s cover represents the personality of the magazine. The reader is meant to aspire towards being like the cover model.
  7. 7. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines Coverlines Cosmopolitan magazine uses a lot of cover lines, which are distributed around the main image without detracting from it too much. In our culture we learn to read from left to right and from top to bottom of the page. This is why the prime position for information is the top left hand corner. Front covers also make good use of underlining, emboldening and a variety of font sizes, styles and colour. Magazines usually stick to the same set of fonts for each cover to keep the HOUSE STYLE even though the colours may or may not change. Main cover line This is very large - taking up almost a quarter of the magazine cover – and comes in three layers, each with a different colour. Note the main cover line is positioned against the model's shoulder so it shows up clearly Left third The left third of the magazine cover is vital for sales in shops where the magazine is not shown full-frontage. The title must be easily recognisable in a display of dozens of competitors. The start of the masthead is important here, as are short cover lines that are easy to read Bar code Standard bar code used by retailers Selling line Short, sharp description of the title's main marketing point (for Cosmopolitan: 'The world's No 1 magazine for young women') or perhaps setting out its editorial philosophy. EXEMPLAR The front cover uses a symmetrical layout to give the page balance. It is as though the page is following the „rule of thirds‟ where the page has three distinct columns and a line can be drawn down the centre to show a mirror image. The mirror image is not exact because the coverlines are different but a balance of colours on both sides is used to achieve the overall effect. This is effective because it is pleasing to the eye and the target audience can quickly scan the page from left to right, to get information on the contents. TYPOGR APHYITS ALL ABOUT THE FONT! The typography of a magazine will have a number of factors that you will need to consider. You must consider the COLOUR of a font and the CONNOTATIONS of that font. You must also say whether a font is SERIF or SANS SERIF and talk about the CONNOTATIONS of each.
  8. 8. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines TYPOGR APHY PASTEL COLOURS ARE LESS INTENSE COLOURS AND WILL HAVE A SLIGHTLY DIFFERENT CONNOTATION. Serif has connotations of sophistication, elegance and tradition. Sans Serif has connotations of modernity, youth and simplicity.
  9. 9. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines EXEMPLAR The magazine uses the two font families (serif and sans serif) throughout perhaps to connote that the magazine is for a sophisticated but modern male. The majority of article titles and coverlines are sans serif and bold but the magazine title itself is serif. I think this is a key indicator of the target audience for the magazine because it does connote intelligence and sophistication in comparison to say the title for Loaded or Nuts. LANGUA GE As there is little space on the front of a magazine, the text producer needs to cram a lot of information into a few words. There are a few different techniques the producer uses on the front cover to ensure the reader finds the content appealing. Some producers prefer a particular type of sentence and sometimes this communicates a message about the text. Sentences can be divided into four types: Declaratives: This type of sentence makes a statement or assertion - All Saints get mucky Imperatives: Give orders or make requests - Get stress off your back Interrogatives: Asks questions - Feeding friends? Exclamatives: These are used to express surprise, alarm or a strong opinion and are accompanied by an exclamation mark - Nice tackle!Producers use an array of linguistic tools in order to attract our attention. Rhyme: Catch him, snatch him, make him yours Alliteration: Six simple secrets to keep you looking fabulous Puns: Frisky Fellas. How to spring the little lambs Intertextuality: CURL POWER! You just need to find TWO of these in the unseen extract and talk about the effect that they have on the TARGET AUDIENCE
  10. 10. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines EXEMPLAR The magazine uses a variety of language techniques to excite the reader and fit everything on the front cover. One example is the use of exclamatives and imperatives. For example there is „Lose your Gut! Which is an imperative because it gives the reader and order and „Secrets of Lean Muscle!‟ which is an exclamative because it expresses surprise as though they hold a special recipe for success. STACKED LIKE STACKHOUSE! is another exclamative and it also uses alliteration to grab the attention of the audience. COLOUR EXEMPLAR The most significant point about colour in this magazine is what is missing. There is not a pink or pastel shade in sight. Black, red and blue are central to the colour design of the magazine and this is evident throughout. The colour red has connotations of danger and urgency in this context and of course blue connotes a sense of calm. Bold black text connotes a sense of importance and seriousness. Together they would be considered a very „masculine‟ grouping of
  11. 11. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines Q2 MARK SCHEME Level 4 (16–20 marks) Comprehensive range of examples Detailed analysis of textual evidence from the extract Precise and accurate use of terminology Thorough understanding of connotative effect Ideas expressed clearly and fluently in well structured Level 3 (12–15 marks) Comprehensive range of examples (all bullet points covered) Offers sound textual evidence from the extract Some accurate use of terminology Sound understanding of connotative effect Ideas expressed with some clarity and fluency Level 2 (6–11 marks) Attempts at least three bullet points Offers some textual evidence from the extract Limited use of terminology Some understanding of connotative effect (at the top end) Some simple ideas expressed appropriately Level 1 (0–5 marks) Attempts one or two bullet points Describes some aspects of the extract No, minimal or inaccurate use of terminology Minimal or no understanding of connotative effect Some simple ideas expressed with errors of SPaG Q3 - REPRESENTATION STEROTYPE – USE IT!!!! Question 3 is all about HOW the extract REPRESENTS different people and lifestyles. That means that you need to show (using specific examples) how the people in the magazine are presented. This will include Race, Age, Gender and Class. Their will also be issues surrounding the representation. YOU MUST PICK OUT AT LEAST 2 ISSUES.
  12. 12. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines
  13. 13. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines Answer the questions below: Which social group is being represented here? What is apparently „valued‟ by this social group? (What is important to them?) Why could some of these „values‟ not be integrated into a mainstream magazine like FHM?Level 4 (16–20 marks) Discusses a range of issues of the representation of people and/or lifestyle in the extract, or discusses one or more issues in depth Shows thorough understanding of appropriate representation issues Offers a range of textual evidence from the extract that exemplifies these issues Ideas expressed clearly and fluently in well structured sentences with few, if any, errors of SPaG Level 3 (12–15 marks) Clearly identifies at least one issue of the representation of people and/or lifestyle in the extract Shows sound understanding of appropriate representation issues – accurate use of the term „stereotyping‟ Level 2 (6–11 marks) Describes aspects of representation in the extract Shows some limited understanding of representation issues – uses the concept of stereotyping or the term itself Offers some textual evidence from the extract Simple ideas expressed appropriately. Level 1 (0–5 marks) Describes some aspects of the extract Shows no or minimal understanding of representation issues – no reference to stereotyping Offers minimal textual evidence from the extract Some simple ideas expressed.
  14. 14. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section A - Lifestyle Magazines EXEMPLAR If I look at the magazine as though it is telling a story about who men are and how they live their lives, I would conclude that men are obsessed with their muscles, working out and their diet, heterosexual and like to look at women wearing only a bra and pants, owning gadgets that make their life simple and having the right clothes to look good. If I didn‟t know better I might argue that this is ideally suited to what men want and need in life. However, I do know better and I would say that this magazine presents society with an issue. In the same way that women have always been represented as being obsessed with diets, the perfect dress size, clothes, beauty and sex – men are now being represented as having similar obsessions. A criticism of this type of lifestyle magazine is that it sets up a vision of the „ ideal‟ man and then makes audiences insecure about not being able to obtain this apparently better version of themselves. The magazine uses a photograph of a handsome slim celebrity with muscles and veins and holds this up as what men should aspire to look like. It then seems to point a finger at the reader who is no doubt already comparing his arms to the arms in the photo and demands; „LOSE YOUR GUT!‟ in bold capitals. In the contents under ALPHA MALE it asks, „isn‟t it time you started upping your game?‟ so it sets out a problem and offers a solution. It also suggests that the reader needs to learn sex tricks and make „simple purchases that will drive her wild.‟ The magazine has many more solutions to offer the reader for a range of problems he might have. To be honest, you might start reading the magazine thinking you were OK but by the time you‟ve finished you‟d have so many insecurities about how you looked you wouldn‟t be feeling so confident. Maybe this is why people buy it every month? They‟re now convinced they‟re useless and need all the advice the magazine can throw at them!
  15. 15. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy This section of the exam is all about TV Comedy and the channels that they are scheduled on. This year we have studied: Gavin & Stacey on the BBC The Big Bang Theory on E4/Channel 4 You will need to know all about the specific episodes and the characters in them. Gavin & Stacey - Series 1 Episode 1 - Sunday 13th May 07 – 9pm on BBC Three The Big Bang Theory – Series 6 Episode 14 – Thursday 2nd May 2013 – 8pm on E4 You must know all of this! The most important part of this question!
  16. 16. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy Bernadette Howard Raj Penny Sheldon Leonard Amy Bryn Gwen Nessa Stacey Gavin Smithy Mick & Pam
  17. 17. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy
  18. 18. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy
  19. 19. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy Level 4 (12-15 marks) Discusses the scheduling of two comedies Precise and accurate use of terminology Shows detailed knowledge of TV or radio channels and scheduling with understanding of how programmes reflect institutional contexts Thorough understanding of how channels use scheduling to reach audiences Ideas expressed clearly and fluently in well structured sentences. Level 3 (9-11 marks) Accurately describes and evaluates the scheduling of two comedies Some accurate use of terminology Shows sound knowledge of TV or radio channels and scheduling with some understanding of how programmes reflect institutional contexts Sound understanding of how channels use scheduling to reach audiences Ideas expressed with some clarity and fluency. Level 2 (4-8 marks) Describes the scheduling of two comedies Limited use of terminology Shows some knowledge of TV or radio channels and scheduling Some understanding of how channels use scheduling to reach audiences Simple ideas expressed appropriately but possibly with some errors of SPaG. Level 1 (0-3 marks) Partially describes the scheduling of one or two comedies Shows minimal knowledge of TV or radio channels and scheduling Some simple ideas expressed with errors of SPaG that obscure meaning. EXEMPLAR Friends is shown on E4 which is part of the Channel 4 institution which is aimed at a young audience like Friends is as it attracts categories from the audience demographic category E. It is shown 5pm until 6pm in paired episodes to hook viewers on E4 and is then repeated on E4+1 from 6pm to 7pm every weekday. This is because both these times are very competitive for the teenage audience slot; by showing it at both times the channel is more likely to gain more viewers. Back in 1994 Friends was broadcasted on Sky 1 and 9pm, before the watershed but was later bought by Channel 4 in 1996 as it proved very popular and as Channel 4 is under the public service broadcasting regulations it cannot show Friends on a stripped schedule in repeated blocks like E4 as it has to attract other audience demographics not just the niche audience Friends attracts. E4 was set up to appeal to a niche
  20. 20. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV ComedyEXEMPLAR 2
  21. 21. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy You need to identify & give examples of four audience pleasures and how it generates pleasure (comedy). The exam may ask for examples from TWO or ONE program. FOR ONE PROGRAM – USE 2 EXAMPLES PER PLEASURE FOR TWO PROGRAMS – USE AN EXAMPLE FROM EACH PROGRAME PER PLEASURE. Make sure that you know the examples Talk about the audience!!! Don‟t forget to explain what the pleasure is!
  22. 22. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy
  23. 23. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy Level 4 (12-15 marks) Shows detailed knowledge of audience pleasures Thorough understanding of how programmes offer audience pleasures Detailed and appropriate exemplification Ideas expressed clearly and fluently in well structured sentences. Level 3 (9-11 marks) Shows sound knowledge of different audience pleasures Sound understanding of how programmes offer audience pleasures Relevant textual exemplification (with some detail at the top of the band) Ideas expressed with some clarity and fluency. Level 2 (4-8 marks) Shows knowledge of one or two audience pleasures Basic understanding of how at least one programme offers audience pleasures Some textual exemplification (at the top of the band) Some ideas expressed appropriately but possibly with some errors of SPaG. Level 1 (0-3 marks) Describes one text Some simple ideas expressed with errors of spelling, punctuation and grammar that obscure meaning. Writing may also lack legibility EXEMPLAR Friends is a sitcom is which the actors follow a script which means that the actors and writers have a symbiotic relationship allowing for comedic timing but also by being scripted it allows audiences to feel included in the storyline and watch it unfold from one episode to the next e.g. when in one episode they all go to a beach and Ross brings his girlfriend: she shakes her head and Ross dumps her for Rachel but by the next episode Ross and Rachel are fighting and throwing objects at each other. Whereas „Have I Got News For You‟ is a panel show and has a loose no narrative and is unscripted therefore allowing different opinions to be raised in the show. The show ridicules topics in the news and the audience feel good as they feel as though they know what is going on in the world. Also in Friends and every sitcom after most episodes it comes to a conclusion and audiences like to watch enigma and resolution of the episode e.g. The one where the monkey gets away, the episode starts in a state of equilibrium where Rachel is looking after Marseille the monkey but then it goes into a state of disequilibrium when he runs out of the door and so most of the episode involves the whole gang looking for the monkey around New York and is resolved when [unreadable] cannot give him back after they shot Phoebe with a dart and so the disruption is restored when the monkey is returned and the audience feel as though they have been on a journey with the character. Whereas HIGNFY doesn‟t come to a conclusion they just play the game and try to gain as many points as they can by being satirical and humorous; they offer different audience gratifications such as in one episode when Frank Skinner is guest host they show a clip of Gordon Brown saying he was responsible for a mistake and then contradicting himself by saying he fired the person responsible leading journalist Ian Hislop to say “Pure Stalin” so it is offering the audience an attack on wealthy people or those who are usually highly regarded becoming figures of ridicule – making the audience feel better about themselves. Lastly in Friends audiences can relate to the characters and understand what they are doing e.g. when Chandler gets a promotion to a great job is season eight the audience can relate the situation and like his character but for characters audiences don‟t like, we like to see them suffer
  24. 24. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy
  25. 25. GCSE MEDIA REVISION B324 Section B – TV Comedy If you have revised and worked hard then you don‟t need it, but… GOOD LUCK

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