An Industry Up in the Air

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A keynote for TCA in London, this speech outlines the challenges facing IT channels, including Cloud Computing.

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  • The Speaker Notes are very important but for some reason they appear here OUT of ORDER after Slide 6. That's the fault of the conversion, not the author. If you read these and look back one slide or two, then it makes sense. Basically the author argues that once again man-made constructions (Cloud Computing) parallels the natural world. There is a reason we can't agree on a definition, like early man who stood in different places in the world and who tried to described the night sky. And there are so many different clouds in nature that most of us can't name more than a few. And scientists are only now understanding THEY REALLY DON'T KNOW CLOUDS AT ALL.
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  • Expressions in English that mean you are SOLID...
    --Well Grounded
    --Both Feet on the Ground
  • Expressions in English that mean you can’t focus, you drift...
    --Your Head in the Clouds
    --A cloud on the horizon
    --Please come down to earth
    --How’s the weather UP there?

    Even in French
    --ETRE DANS LA LUNE
  • NEED FOR CLOUD STANDARDS.

    JANUARY 08, 2010
    Cerf urges standards for cloud computing
    Management of cloud assets requires protocols, standards, and research, Internet protocol designer says
    By Paul Krill | InfoWorld
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    Vint Cerf, a co-designer of the Internet's TCP/IP protocols and considered a father of the Internet itself, emphasized the need for data portability standards for cloud computing during an appearance on Thursday evening.
    There are different clouds from companies such as Microsoft, Amazon, IBM and Google, but a lack of interoperability between them, Cerf explained at a session of the Churchill Club business and technology organization in Menlo Park, Calif.
    "At some point, it makes sense for somebody to say, 'I want to move my data from cloud A to cloud B,' " but the different clouds do not know each other, he said.
    "We don't have any inter-cloud standards," Cerf said.  The current cloud situation is similar to the lack of communication and familiarity among computer networks in 1973, said Cerf, who is vice president and chief Internet evangelist at Google.
    "People are going to want to move data around, they're going to want to ask clouds to do things for them," said Cerf. They might even want to have multiple clouds interact with each other in order to take advantage of the computing power offered through such combinations, he said.
    "There's a whole raft of research work still to be done and protocols to be designed and standards to be adopted that will allow people to manage assets" in clouds, Cerf said. Google, for its part, is resonant with this notion, he said. But right now, users can get data out of the Google cloud but perhaps not  send it to another cloud.
    He also stressed cloud security. "Strong authentication will be a critical element in the securing of clouds," said Cerf. The Obama Administration, for its part, has expressed a desire to use cloud-based computing techniques to make government more efficient and for inter-agency communication, he said.
    Commenting on other topics, Cerf predicted a growing role for mobile devices in everyday life and connections of more appliances, including home appliances and office equipment, to the Internet. "Once you do that, the mobile [device] is potentially the remote controller for all of these things," he said.
    "The mobile now replaces all those little remotes that are sitting on the table in front of you," said Cerf.
    He endorsed the notion of opening access to "white spaces" -- unused broadcasting spectrum serving as a buffer between TV channels  --  as a way to expand broadcast access. Google would like to see the white spaces unlicensed and said technology today exists to enable use of the white spaces.

    Questioned about offering inexpensive wireless or broadband services, Cerf said different entities should continue building and operating different pieces of the Internet and put them together, rather than Google itself taking on the whole task. He explained that Google had gotten involved in plans to build a free WiFi service for San Francisco and developed a pilot project for Mountain View, Calif.,  south of San Francisco. But the project scope began expanding to include 29 jurisdictions in the area.
    "As a business model, it's hard for me to imagine a global company like Google wanting to invest in infrastructure for the entire world," Cerf said.
    Cerf also said he has been working with NASA to see if the interplanetary protocols in development can be put on top of the Google-backed Android OS for mobile devices. Eventually, mobile devices might be able to communicate with satellites via these protocols, thus enabling more complex space missions involving multiple space crafts, he said.
    Optical switching also has caught his attention. "I have become very excited about optical switching as an efficient way of moving huge quantities of information back and forth," Cerf said.
    Cerf also endorsed the notion of IP-based television to support services such as on-demand programming. "A packaged-switch system can support on-demand more easily," he said.

    This article, "Cerf urges standards for cloud computing," originally appeared at InfoWorld.com.

    http://www.infoworld.com/d/cloud-computing/cerf-urges-standards-cloud-computing-817
  • Not all cloud images are pretty, fluffy and kind
  • Mainstream IT Buys into Cloud Computing: CA to Acquire 3Tera - A Message from Barry X Lynn, CEO 3Tera
    Filed under: 3tera, AppLogic, Cloud Computing, Customers, Random Thoughts, Utility Computing — Tags: 3tera, barry x lynn, ca — bxl — February 24, 2010 @ 7:13 am
    We started 3Tera to radically ease the way IT deploys, maintains and scales – MANAGES - applications. Our AppLogic® cloud computing platform provides the foundation of our partners’ orchestration of cloud services for public and private clouds around the world. Today, we’re taking the next step in moving toward making cloud computing mainstream by joining CA.
    CA and 3Tera share a common vision for the future of cloud computing, and we are excited about the opportunities that this acquisition will create for our customers, partners and their cloud users.
    This is a historic moment in Cloud Computing. The significance of this acquisition is a heck of a lot more than just a land grab in a hot space. We are confident that as a team, CA and 3Tera, will extend our leadership of the cloud computing platform market.
    We are honored, given the plethora of Cloud Computing companies that have emerged in the last few years, that CA has chosen us. We really are!
    It would probably be arrogant to suggest that we, in turn, chose CA. So I won’t suggest that. But the fact is, we had many options for the future and this is the one that excited us the most.
    Now, there are only two kinds of people thinking about Cloud Computing: those who believe it is the future of information technology and those who are in complete denial.
    I’ve been around a long time, probably longer than most of the readers of this post. During this time, I have seen three major paradigm shifts in IT.
    For my first 20 years in this game, Moore’s Law was, as it always has been, and still will be for a while, in effect. Computers became exponentially more powerful, faster and cheaper. But, for those 20 years it was big central computers doing everything.
    So, the first paradigm shift was away from these big centralized systems to client server or distributed systems. There were those who had the vision that inexpensive work stations and servers, connected over a network, would take on much of the load that the big central computers were processing. And there were also those who were in denial.
    The second big shift was the rise of the browser and eCommerce. Some of you may be surprised that I did not say the Internet. The fact is, though, Internet technology was around for years before there was a consumer-based Internet, deployed by the government as a way to interconnect various agencies. It was known as the ArpaNet. The browser put a user friendly graphical user interface on top of it and eCommerce was born.
    There were those who had a vision that the Internet would be a common way for businesses and consumers to communicate and become widely used for effecting financial transactions. And there were those who were in denial.
    The third shift is Cloud Computing. Computing is pervasive. It is no longer something used and accessed by an elite few. Computing is as much a part of life as telephone, television, electricity, etc.
    So, the natural evolution of computing is for it to become a utility that anyone can tap into, like other utilities, consuming only what one needs–no more, no less– but always having enough available capacity when needed.
    This is Cloud Computing – the encapsulation of applications as autonomous services, abstracted from infrastructure that its users do not care about, except that it’s available and reliable when needed – services that can be available anytime, anywhere, when called upon.
    There are those who believe Cloud is the future and there are those in denial.
    Like distributed systems, which became pervasive when the ability to precisely manage networks of servers and work stations became available; and, like the Internet, which became pervasive when the ability to manage dynamic web sites securely with high performance; so will go Cloud Computing.
    I’ve heard some compare what is going on now to the internet bubble of the ‘90s. I’ve actually heard it referred to as the Cloud bubble. The big difference between the Internet bubble and the Cloud bubble is that today’s economy doesn’t dictate the kind of crazy valuations we saw in the ‘90s (or maybe today’s economy is just more realistic than that of the Internet bubble).
    But they have something very significant in common, I believe.
    During the Internet bubble, everyone and his brother with a web site, from giant infrastructure companies to retailers of boutique niche products, were perceived to be the future. When the dust settled though, most couldn’t maintain their value – except for the Internet infrastructure providers, that is. It was not just anyone with an Internet presence. It was mostly those who enabled the Internet – who provided the infrastructure to deal with it – to manage it!
    Just as everyone tried to stake a claim to a piece of the Internet in the ‘90s, now there are a gazillion companies with Cloud presence. When the dust settles, though, the long term value will be retained for the shareholders of the companies that provide the infrastructure, enabling capabilities and management of Cloud Computing.
    CA is a management company. Their mission has always been and remains centered on the management of information technology. Their ability to adapt and manage each generation of technology has enabled them to thrive through all of these shifts.
    While there are several management vendors out there, we see most figuring out how to shoehorn customers’ needs into what they already have. But tails can only wag dogs for a short period of time. The big winners will be those who adapt and evolve what they have into real, more than wannabe, Cloud Computing management.
    That’s the historic statement. CA has drawn that line in the sand, and we’re thrilled to be part of it.
    The leading innovator of IT management technology and the leading innovator of Cloud Computing technology are now one and the same!
  • Gartner says there needs to be these 5 attributes to call it a Cloud:
     
    Service-Based
    Scalable and Elastic
    Shared
    Metered by Use
    Use Internet Technologies
  • Think about—wherever you are—looking up at the night sky.

    You look up and describe exactly what you see. Someone else, on the other side of the world, does the same.

    You both describe a beautiful night sky but what you see varies from where you are standing.

    What you describe as Cloud Computing depends upon where you stand in the industry, who your partners, customers and suppliers are.
  • HECK, AFTER ALL THESE YEARS, OUR TOP SCIENTISTS HAVE ONLY NOW FIGURED OUT THAT WE DON’T YET EVEN UNDERSTANDING THE MOST BASIC CLOUD PROCESSES IN NATURE...

    SO IN A WAY, ONCE AGAIN, COMPUTING PARALLELS NATURE
  • There’s another problem. Just as in nature, you can see many different types of clouds. My favourite, the altocumulus is very different than, let’s say, the stratus cloud. And these cloud types with different characteristics are present at different levels in the sky: for example, cirrus live above 18,000 feet while my altocumulus prefer a zone between 6000-20,000 ft.
     
    Clouds in the IT troposphere come in different varieties-- differing by what they service (whether they host platforms, deliver applications, or supply infrastructure and data storage.) You could say Applications are the stratus while Infrastructure is the cirrus but any way you look at it we end up paralleling nature’s troposphere.
     
    There are also virtual private clouds, public clouds, hybrids and more as the IT industry scrambles to define each new usage.
     
    Gartner says there needs to be these 5 attributes to call it a Cloud:
     
    Service-Based
    Scalable and Elastic
    Shared
    Metered by Use
    Use Internet Technologies
     
    On the other side, while vendors are fighting each other to define cloud computing, cloud computing is already redefining the landscape. Vendors are rising or falling as they attack and parry in the marketplace with cloud versus traditional computing.
  • Lenticular clouds, technically known as altocumulus standing lenticularis, are stationary lens-shaped clouds that form at high altitudes, normally aligned at right-angles to the wind direction. They have been mistaken for UFOs (or “visual cover” for UFOs) because these clouds have a characteristic lens appearance and smooth saucer-like shape. Read more on wikipedia See more on google images
  • There’s another problem. Just as in nature, you can see many different types of clouds. My favourite, the altocumulus is very different than, let’s say, the stratus cloud. And these cloud types with different characteristics are present at different levels in the sky: for example, cirrus live above 18,000 feet while my altocumulus prefer a zone between 6000-20,000 ft.
     
    Clouds in the IT troposphere come in different varieties-- differing by what they service (whether they host platforms, deliver applications, or supply infrastructure and data storage.) You could say Applications are the cirrus while Infrastructure is the stratus (I’ll leave that to TECH GUYS to debate) but any way you look at it we end up paralleling nature’s troposphere.
     
    There are also virtual private clouds, public clouds, hybrids and more as the IT industry scrambles to define each new usage.
     
    Gartner says there needs to be these 5 attributes to call it a Cloud:
     
    Service-Based
    Scalable and Elastic
    Shared
    Metered by Use
    Use Internet Technologies
     
    On the other side, while vendors are fighting each other to define cloud computing, cloud computing is already redefining the landscape. Vendors are rising or falling as they attack and parry in the marketplace with cloud versus traditional computing.
  • THE WAR BETWEEN WEB & WINDOWS IS OVER. WEB WON.
  • Precisely because we are connected we can be as free as a cloud
  • CLOUD is further complicated at the different TIERS of customers. TIER 1, the FORTUNE 500 think of cloud in one way.

    We are mote concerned with how SMBs will react. IDC’s European Vertical Markets recently released a new report, which clusters the Western European Small and Medium-sized Business (SMB) business environment.

    OK, I DID ADD THE NAMES JUST TO anthropomorphize THESE CLUSTERS...but...

    NOW we can see CLOUD has to move through not just TIER 1 vs TIER 2, but has to float by different types of customer culture in each TIER.

    IF there are so many different customers, how can there be only ONE CLOUD? And even nature has no answer for than and is multifarious


  • NEGATIVES YOU HEAR THE “MARIE”s of THIS WORLD...

    ... Relies totally on network connections, if the network goes down then you’re done until the computer is back up, or if the network is bogged up then everything will be slower.
    Doesn’t use a hard drive, while it also can be a benefit it is also a negative as some applications might require a hard drive attached to the computer.
    Changes in applications happen without your knowledge or consent, your data is not directly in your hands but in the hands of a third-party.
    You are dependant on your internet connection which could be a problem if connection fails and could be a problem for mission critical applications. When your offline cloud computing simply doesn’t work
    Although even on a fast connection it may be slow trying to access a similar software program on your desktop.
    Stored data might not be secure; with cloud computing all your data is stored on the cloud.
    Stored data can be lost as well, data stored on the cloud is unusually safe but if your data goes missing you have no physical or local backup.
  • How to we distinguish ourselves
  • David Boulter, vice president of Capgemini's new Infostructure Transformation Services, which launched on Monday.
    David Boulter, vice president of Capgemini's new Infostructure Transformation Services, which launched on Monday.
    Capgemini is seeing real demand from its customers around the world for cloud computing and services and that the company now has experience in the area, according to Boulter.
    "If we were having this discussion a year ago, I think we would have said it was an interesting hype, but that we haven't quite worked it out yet and we haven't got enough experience," said Boulter.
    Ultimately, all companies will use aspects of cloud computing and services. However, companies shouldn't rush to start using the cloud, according to Boulter. Whether or not it makes sense to move an application to the cloud depends a lot on a company's business model for the application in question. If there is a lot of variable demand on the application, then it can make sense to move the application to the cloud, Boulter said.
    But for a number business sectors that is not a valid advantage, because the volumes their systems have to handle are fairly stable, according to Boulter. Also, a lot of companies' legacy applications can't be cloud-enabled, he said.
  • BUT WHEN THE WAR IS OVER, WHAT WILL BE LEFT IN THE LANDSCAPE FOR RESELLERS...

    LOVELY PHOTO, ISN’T IT?

    NOTE THE SMALL SIGN in front of THE TRACTOR: FOR SALE.

    IT’S BEAUTIFUL BUT IF THE REAL ESTATE CAN’T SUPPORT YOU, WHAT’S IT WORTH?
  • An Industry Up in the Air

    1. 1. An Industry Up in the .... by Bob Snyder
    2. 2. Expressions in English that mean you are SOLID... --Well Grounded --Both Feet on the Ground
    3. 3. GET YOUR HEAD OUT OF THE CLOUDS
    4. 4. You know what they say... “Fog is just low flying Clouds...”
    5. 5. Can’t Build Without Standards
    6. 6. • Now, there are only two kinds of people thinking about Cloud Computing: those who believe it is the future of information technology and those who are in complete denial. • ...the natural evolution of computing is to become a utility Barry X Lynn, CEO 3Tera
    7. 7. What you describe as Cloud Computing depends upon where you stand in the industry, who your partners, customers and suppliers are.
    8. 8. Science 19 February 2010: Vol. 327. no. 5968, pp. 970 - 971 DOI: 10.1126/science.1185138 Prev | Table of Contents | Next Perspectives Atmospheric Science: Can We Understand Clouds Without Turbulence? E. Bodenschatz,1,2 S. P. Malinowski,3 R. A. Shaw,4 F. Stratmann5 Just over 50 years ago, Henry Houghton published an essay in Science entitled "Cloud physics: Not all questions about nucleation, growth, and precipitation of water particles are yet answered" (1). Since then, understanding of cloud processes has advanced enormously, yet we still face some of the basic questions Houghton drew attention to. The interest in finding the answers, however, has steadily increased, largely because clouds are a primary source of uncertainty in projections of future climate (2). Why is our understanding of cloud processes still so inadequate, and what are the prospects for the future?
    9. 9. CLOUDS IN THE IT TROPOSPHERE Stratus INFRASTRUCTURE & DATA STORAGE Alto PLATFORM Cirrus APPLICATIONS
    10. 10. What Microsoft Says...
    11. 11. What Microsoft Says...
    12. 12. What Microsoft Says...
    13. 13. What Microsoft Says...
    14. 14. What Microsoft Says...
    15. 15. The War is Over.
    16. 16. Consumer IT Business IT M2M
    17. 17. The Connected Age
    18. 18. Four Types of SMBs • The laggards (16%) have a basic infrastructure and limited willingness to invest in the near term. “HELMUT” 2010 –IDC’s European Vertical Markets recently released a new report, which clusters the Western European Small and Medium-sized Business (SMB) business environment.
    19. 19. • Wait-and-see companies (36%) have a solid deployment of IT but prefer to wait until technology is mature and widely present in the market before engaging in other significant IT investments. Four Types of SMBs “MARIE”
    20. 20. Not Everyone Looks on Clouds as White, Fluffy & Friendly
    21. 21. • IT-oriented companies (21%) have a solid IT deployment and a high propensity to invest further. Four Types of SMBs “MARC”
    22. 22. • The fast followers (16%) cluster despite a lower-than-average adoption of IT is the most keen to close the technology gap with early adopters. Four Types of SMBs “HARRY”
    23. 23. Channel Partners • Come in similar flavours to match their SMB customers • If they can transform themselves, they can’t transform their customer’s business • Issues surround the financial aspect of climbing on-board the CLOUD
    24. 24. The role of the channel in the Cloud World....
    25. 25. Need to Shift Our Outlook
    26. 26. Channel Partners • It wouldn’t be a “sea-change” if no one got swamped... • Battle for who will educate the market • The emergence of new players • The re-defining of distributors • A foot in one world, the other in the other
    27. 27. WHAT DO VALUE-ADDED RESELLERS THINK ABOUT THEIR ROLE IN CLOUD COMPUTING?
    28. 28. Capgemini Sees Real Demand • "If we were having this discussion a year ago, I think we would have said it was an interesting hype, but that we haven't quite worked it out yet and we haven't got enough experience," says David Boulter, VP of this newest group. • “Ultimately, all companies will use aspects of cloud computing and services...” CAPGEMINI’s Infostructure Transformation Services launched this year!
    29. 29. Still Hardware Opportunities...
    30. 30. IT’S BEAUTIFUL BUT IF THE REAL ESTATE CAN’T SUPPORT YOU, WHAT’S IT WORTH?
    31. 31. EVERY CLOUD COMES WITH A SILVER LINING
    32. 32. Dive in Yourself To sell it, you have to understand it... To understand it, you have to use it yourself
    33. 33. An Industry Up in the .... by Bob Snyder
    34. 34. CHANNEL MEDIA EUROPE... publishers of industry eNEWSLETTERS for channel www.ConsumerIT.eu www.IT-SP.eu www.On-CE.eu www.ProAVbiz-Europe.com www.ECInews.eu www.DigitalSignageNews.eu

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