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Get Your Attorneys “Lady Gaga” Media Attention When Their Work is as Exciting as Stapling a Brief

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Get Your Attorneys “Lady Gaga” Media Attention When Their Work is as Exciting as Stapling a Brief

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Presented to the Association of Legal Administrators in Chicago, December 2012

Presented to the Association of Legal Administrators in Chicago, December 2012

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Get Your Attorneys “Lady Gaga” Media Attention When Their Work is as Exciting as Stapling a Brief

  1. 1. Presented by TC Public Relations
  2. 2.  N – No news value  U – Unimportant information  T – Too lengthy  S - Stalking
  3. 3. 1. Analysis 4. Track 2. Inventory 3. Message
  4. 4.  Your Firm’s Practice Areas  Competition  Non-conflict legal news or trends
  5. 5. 2. Inventory Firm history
  6. 6. Asylum seekers benefit from pro bono legal representation for housing and welfare benefits appeals. Photograph: Sean Dempsey/PA
  7. 7. “I don’t have anything worth saying, but trust me and publish my press release.”
  8. 8. How can I help provide the best legal sources available?
  9. 9. Breaking News In The News Contributor
  10. 10. Typical Topics Comments Count Opinions Matter
  11. 11. Dear [Media contact’s name], I saw your article about [insert topic] today in the [insert publication]. Here’s information from another point of view that can help you as the story progresses…..”
  12. 12. Dear [Media contact’s name], I saw your article about [insert topic] and was curious to know why it did not include [key piece of missing information]. Here’s a [link, attachment] related to that information for your reference.
  13. 13. Dear [Media contact’s name], I saw your article about [insert topic]. As the courts weigh in on [topic] the litigation is likely to go in a new direction. That’s because I’m seeing companies asking for a more aggressive legal strategy on [topic].
  14. 14.  Publications  Contents  Contacts  Alerts
  15. 15.  Helpful Links  Professional Public Relations Tools & Services  Professional Legal Resources ◦ PR Newswire ◦ 2010 Illinois Rules of Professional ◦ PRWeb Conduct ◦ Vocus  RULE 3.6: Trial Publicity ◦ ABA Model Rules of Professional Conduct  Professional Associations ◦ Legal PR Chicago  Online Social Media Monitoring ◦ Public Relations Society of America ◦ Google Alerts ◦ Legal Marketing Association and ◦ Meltwater News the Midwest Chapter ◦ CisionPoint  Law Firm Public Relations Planning Worksheet  Recommended Reading
  16. 16.  N – Notice  E – Editorialize  W – Wait  S – Save contacts
  17. 17. Tom Ciesielka 312-422-1333 tc@tcpr.net

Editor's Notes

  • Ask how they would define public relations. Ask who work s at firm that has experience with media relations.
  • This is the foolish factor, you become the dinner time call from a telemarketer;
  • Ask question about giving away $100,000 for which Supreme Court justice gets the most laughs in court.
  • I’m suggesting this because I saw a blog post that Jay Wexler, a law professor at Boston University, wrote on his website called “Supreme Court Humor.” Basically, it’s about a “study” that he did to see how many laughs each Justice got in the courtroom. According to the graphic on his site, which came from The New York Times, Justice Antonin Scalia got the most laughs when Wexler conducted his study. Example of blog content going viral. Message: good content that generates publicity does take work;
  • Story from Guardian News and Media Limited: National Pro Bono Week is upon us once again. The annual campaign, sponsored by the Bar Council, the Law Society, the Chartered Institute of Legal Executives, and the College of Law, kicked off with a Law Society debate on Monday titled, "Is something always better than nothing?" A good question.Proudest pro bono moment: Involvement in the Asylum Support Appeals Project, which trains lawyers in "asylum support law" so that they can join a duty scheme and represent asylum seekers in appeal hearings about housing and welfare support.Asylum seekers are not allowed to work and are excluded from regular benefits; when asylum support is refused, or withdrawn, an appeal can be made to the asylum support tribunal in London's Docklands but there is no public funding for legal representation.Most appellants are destitute. Many are homeless, some suffer from serious mental and physical health problems and representation increase the chances of a successful appeal from 39% to 61-71% according to a 2009 study by Citizen's Advice called Supporting Justice, says Freshfields.
  • These principles apply to business and consumer media as well as any online communications, such as blogs. The key is to compare firm business development objectives with audience you’ll get in front of.
  • This is worth $200,000
  • Here is something that I have never seen or heard of before: an amicus curiae brief in the form of a cartoon that was submitted in connection with an Apple antitrust case. I found out about it at Legal BlogWatch where Bruce Carton described who created it and why. The attorneys wanted the court to pay attention to their document, and I've gotta say that they've succeeded not only in getting the court's attention, but a lot more publicity than they ever would've gotten by just following the usual
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