Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />School of Business<br />year one goals	1 - 2<br />research proj...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />1<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />year one goals<br />Re-establish workable research strea...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />2<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />year one goals<br />Paper acceptance and research presen...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />3<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 1 (high priority, January 2...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />4<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 2 (high priority, May 2012 ...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />5<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 3 (high priority, October 2...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />6<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 4 (high priority, ongoing t...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />7<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 5 (moderate priority, Decem...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />8<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 6 (moderate priority, ongoi...
Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />9<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />year one key submission deadlines<br />Oct.<br />Nov.<br...
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2011-2013 research plan

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My research agenda for the next couple of years. Ambitious, but potentially fruitful.

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2011-2013 research plan

  1. 1. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />School of Business<br />year one goals 1 - 2<br />research projects 3 - 8<br />year one key submission deadlines 9<br />Administration<br />PORTLAND STATE UNIVERSITY<br />
  2. 2. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />1<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />year one goals<br />Re-establish workable research stream that reflects academic interests and classroom instruction specialties<br />Maintain Academically Qualified (AQ) status in the Portland State University School of Business<br />Manuscript acceptance in at least one target journal<br />Target Journals<br />Research Tier<br />4+<br />Journal of Consumer Research* (10% acceptance rate)<br />Journal of Advertising*(15% acceptance rate)<br />Journal of Advertising Research*<br />Psychology & Marketing*<br />Journal of Interactive Marketing*<br />International Journal of Advertising*<br />Journal of Interactive Advertising<br />Journal of Theoretical & Applied eMarketing & <br /> Online Consumer Behaviour<br />Journal of Marketing Communications*<br />Journal of Advertising Education<br />* Ranking based on Association of Business Schools Academic Journal Quality Guide March 2010<br />4<br />3<br />4+ A world elite journal<br />4 A top journal<br />3 A highly regarded journal<br />2 A well regarded journal<br />1 A recognized journal <br />2<br />1<br />
  3. 3. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />2<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />year one goals<br />Paper acceptance and research presentation at one or more target academic conferences<br />Target Conferences<br />Advertising Academy Status<br />+<br />American Academy of Advertising Conference <br />(48% acceptance rate)<br />Association for Education in Journalism & Mass Communication <br />Conference (45% acceptance rate)<br />Association of Collegiate Marketing Educators Conference<br />Empirical Generalizations in Advertising Conference<br />International Advertising & Integrated Marketing <br />Communications Conference<br />American Advertising Federation National Conference<br />-<br />
  4. 4. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />3<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 1 (high priority, January 2012 deadline)<br />Gamification of promotional mix<br />Background<br />As audiences become more and more desensitized and subsequently non-receptive to advertising, marketers have increasingly explored ways of making brand exposures and commercial messages more engaging for consumers. One approach gaining particular popularity among marketers and consumers alike is the use of gaming in promotional offers and messages. Gamification in a marketing context involves the use of game play to compel consumers to engage in market behaviors normally considered pedestrian or dull. Largely unexplored by academic researchers, typologies of game-types and theoretical underpinnings surrounding consumer use of games is needed to provide a more solid base from which a body of knowledge can grow. <br />Research purpose<br />Conduct an extensive literature review that examines advertising gamification more broadly than done previously and develop an exhaustive typology of game-types used in marketing/advertising along with a flow diagram that includes antecedents and consequences of utilizing games and gaming in the promotional mix <br />Broad research questions<br />What are the various types of marketing game utilization that exist offline, online, and through multi-channel strategies (hybrid approaches)? <br />What factors have been identified in previous studies as viable qualifications for the use of gaming in branding/promotional efforts? <br />What market consequences of the use of gaming in branding/promotional efforts have been identified in previous studies? <br />Methodology<br />Comprehensive literature review and theoretical model development<br />Current stage of development<br />Currently reviewing literature, particularly in the Journal of Interactive Advertising. Have also consulted with Renny Gleeson, Global Director of Interactive Strategies at Wieden + Kennedy and former game developer. <br />Potential collaborators<br />Renny Gleeson<br />Potential publications<br />Journal of Advertising Special Issue on Advergames, In-Game Advertising, and Social Media Games; Association of Collegiate Marketing Educators Conference<br />
  5. 5. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />4<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 2 (high priority, May 2012 deadline)<br />Contextual effects of social media on audiences’ word-of-mouth behaviors<br />Background<br />Everyday consumers find new online vehicles that facilitate the spreading of positive and negative dialogue regarding brand experiences. Building on previous research done on media context and its moderating effect on negative feelings of offensive advertising messages, this study will explore whether or not certain social media channels influence the valence and proclivity of online word of mouth (WOM). It is hoped that so doing will identify media-channel-specific conditions that facilitate online WOM, benefiting both practitioners trying to convince clients to incorporate social media in relationship-driven campaigns and academics building theory that explains the online WOM phenomenon. <br />Research purpose<br />Identify the most and least effective channels to use in social media campaigns that are created to generate word of mouth across several online platforms<br />Broad research questions<br />How would existing diffusion of innovation and complaint-behavior literature explain online word-of-mouth response paths?<br />2<br />How do social media variables (type, vehicle, tone, etc.) influence word-of-mouth behavior? <br />Do certain social media channels lend themselves to negative (or positive) word of mouth? <br />Methodology<br />Content analysis of consumers’ brand mentions across several social media channels along with accompanying survey to social media users that measures word of mouth behaviors and intentions across several different online platforms<br />Current stage of development<br />Currently reviewing literature on complaint behavior and diffusion theories. Currently discussing research idea with co-author (Dr. David Waller) from previously published work. <br />Potential collaborators<br />David Waller (U. of Technology, Sydney)<br />Potential publications<br />Journal of Marketing Communications Special Issue on Word of Mouth and Social Media; Journal of Theoretical & Applied eMarketing & Online Consumer Behaviour Special Issue on Qualitative Approaches to eMarketing & Online Consumer Behaviour; International Advertising & Integrated Marketing Communications Conference<br />
  6. 6. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />5<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 3 (high priority, October 2011 deadline)<br />The difference between account planners and digital strategists and how the difference affects client, agency, consumer, and educator stakeholders<br />Background<br />In order to develop more sustainable business models by adapting to changing market conditions created by shifts in how audiences consume media, many traditional advertising agencies have been forced to add new departmental units and/or reorganize operational structures. Most often, agencies have created new digital strategy departments in an effort to maintain clients that demand greater use of and emphasis on digital media channels. However, the roles of account planners and digital strategists are at the core the same. Both entail deep understanding of audiences, with the latter simply specializing in online consumer behavior. Building on previous published research on account planning, there is a need to gain a better understanding of the rapid shifts agencies are being forced to make in light of the growing dependency consumers place on digital media. These shifts affect clients and the agencies they vet, consumers and how they are reached, as well as university programs wishing to remain up-to-date with and reflective of the advertising industry they serve. <br />Research purpose<br />Examine how agencies have restructured their operations in light of continual growth in audience consumption of digital media to highlight necessary supplemental shifts various stakeholder groups must make<br />Broad research questions<br />How are agencies providing additional digital services to clients?<br />How have the addition of digital departments changed the advertising campaign development process?<br />What effects on client relations, audience research, and advertising program curricula does agency restructuring create? <br />Methodology<br />Survey agency account planners’ and digital strategists’ views and experiences of agency restructuring <br />Current stage of development<br />Review of both trade and academic literature that will be instrumental in questionnaire development is currently underway. A list of full-service agencies that provide digital services is also being created. <br />Potential collaborators<br />Dr. Eric Haley (U. of Tennessee) and Dr. Margie Morrison (U. of Tennessee)<br />Potential publications<br />American Academy of Advertising Conference; Association of Collegiate Marketing Educators Conference; Journal of Advertising Education<br />
  7. 7. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />6<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 4 (high priority, ongoing topic of interest)<br />The persuasive power of the inside joke on advertising effectiveness <br />Background<br />Existing psychological research has consistently demonstrated the effect of in- and out-group membership on people’s thoughts, feelings, and behaviors. Taking this literature one step further and applying it to advertising effects research has rich potential. More specifically, examination of the effects of the so-called “inside joke” as it applies to online socially disseminated advertising (e.g., viral videos) has yet to be explored. The “inside joke” phenomenon occurs when one comes across a message that one’s reference group gets, but one does not understand because s/he has been left out of the social loop or was not part of the original “punchline.” It is possible that being presented a brand/advertising message that initially one does not understand due to lack of context but is somehow clued into its significance by others would make that person more curious and eager to learn about a brand. <br />Research purpose<br />Determine whether or not the “inside joke” phenomenon can be used to increase the favorability of a brand<br />Broad research questions<br />How does the “inside joke” affect people’s perceptions of advertising messages specifically and brand names generally?<br />How does in-group versus out-group membership influence a person’s likelihood to spread a message online?<br />How influential is an in-group member on other’s brand perceptions?<br />Methodology<br />Experimental design using confederates to act as in-group members to test their influence on out-group members<br />Current stage of development<br />Still in early stages of conceptualization, with greatest difficulty understanding how best to experimentally manipulate the “inside joke” phenomenon. <br />Potential collaborators<br />N/A<br />Potential publications<br />Journal of Advertising; Journal of Consumer Research; Psychology & Marketing; International Journal of Advertising Special Issue on Customized Communication: Issues of Relevance & Privacy<br />
  8. 8. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />7<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 5 (moderate priority, December 2011 deadline)<br />Using social media in the classroom to more effectively teach creative and media strategy <br />Background<br />The use of digital media, in particular so-called Web 2.0 technologies, continues to grow in importance among both marketers and the agencies that serve them. Subsequently, agency job growth in social-media-relevant positions is at an all-time high. As such, there is an increased need for professionals well-versed in the strategic and tactical aspects of social media as an advertising tool. Due to curriculum constraints, very few advertising programs offer social media specific courses that expose students to the many ways in which Web 2.0 technologies can be leveraged in the marketplace. One solution to this problem is to utilize social media in advertising courses as a teaching tool to expose students experientially to the inner workings of these channels. This study will investigate various ways in which social media may be used to (1) better educate students on creative and media strategy concepts and (2) experientially expose students to the inner workings of social media strategic tool.<br />Research purpose<br />Highlight ways that social media can be used to teach both rudimentary and advanced advertising strategy concepts while sharing methods used and successes/failures experienced in courses taught<br />Broad research questions<br />How can social media be used effectively to better educate advertising and marketing students?<br />What are the advantages and disadvantages of incorporating social media in the classroom?<br />How do marketing and advertising students feel about the effectiveness of social media as teaching tools?<br />Methodology<br />Case study of own experiences with social media use in the classroom and survey of former students’ views surrounding the effectiveness of such use<br />Current stage of development<br />Gained five years worth of experiences using social media in the classroom teaching various advertising courses, most significantly Creative Strategy and Digital Media Planning, which will be used as base for survey development. <br />Potential collaborators<br />N/A<br />Potential publications<br />American Advertising Federation National Conference; Association of Collegiate Marketing Educators Conference; Journal of Advertising Education<br />
  9. 9. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />8<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />research projects<br />Topic 6 (moderate priority, ongoing topic of interest)<br />Scale development of advertising offensiveness construct<br />Background<br />Through previous qualitative and quantitative investigation of negative consumer perceptions of advertising, a number of variables have been identified that seem to consistently play a role in audience reactions to potentially offensive message stimuli. Combining previous published work, along with relevant loci of control literature, a new scale that reliably and validly predicts negative audience reactions may be created. The existence of such a scale grows in importance as consumers’ online options and proclivities for spreading negative word of mouth increase.<br />Research purpose<br />Create a comprehensive scale that can be used by practitioners to better predict audience reactions that lead to negative word of mouth <br />Broad research questions<br />Can negative reactions to potentially offensive advertising be statistically predicted?<br />What is the influence of consumers’ loci of control in their reactions to potentially offensive advertising?<br />What variables contribute to the greatest variability in reactions to potentially offensive advertising scenarios?<br />Can offensive advertising elements be isolated or do mediating and moderating variables play too significant a factor? <br />Methodology<br />Factorial experiment design (number of factors TBD) <br />Predictive factor analysis, multivariate regression analysis, discriminate analysis<br />Current stage of development<br />Extensive review of offensiveness literature has been completed, as well as two related studies (both published) that provide a conceptual framework from which to build. Review of loci of control literature, however, is largely incomplete, yet ongoing. Once full literature review is complete, research instruments and experimental stimuli can be developed and data collected. <br />Potential collaborators<br />Need to find researcher specializing in tests and measures and multivariate statistical analysis<br />Potential publications<br />Journal of Consumer Research; Journal of Advertising; Journal of Advertising Research; Psychology & Marketing; International Advertising & Integrated Marketing Communications Conference<br />
  10. 10. Dr. Timothy P. Christy<br />9<br />2011 – 2013 research plan<br />year one key submission deadlines<br />Oct.<br />Nov.<br />Dec.<br />Jan.<br />Feb.<br />Mar.<br />May<br />Apr.<br />2011<br />2012<br />30<br />15<br />1<br />1<br />28<br />17<br />15<br />30<br />15<br />1<br />American Academy of Advertising Conference<br />Association of Collegiate Marketing Educators Conference<br />Empirical Generalizations in Advertising Conference<br />J. of Theoretical & Applied Electronic Commerce Research Special Issue<br />International J. of Advertising Special Issue<br />International Advertising & Integrated Marketing Communications Conference<br />American Advertising Federation National Conference<br />J. of Advertising Special Issue<br />Association for Education in Journalism & Mass Communication Conference<br />J. of Marketing Communications Special Issue<br />

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