Characterization

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  • Ask: what happens if a characters speech is inconsistent with his behavior? The reader will be confused.\nWhat happens if the main character is unrealistic? The reader will not believe the character and therefore will not be engaged to the text.\n\n
  • Ask: what happens if a characters speech is inconsistent with his behavior? The reader will be confused.\nWhat happens if the main character is unrealistic? The reader will not believe the character and therefore will not be engaged to the text.\n\n
  • Ask: what happens if a characters speech is inconsistent with his behavior? The reader will be confused.\nWhat happens if the main character is unrealistic? The reader will not believe the character and therefore will not be engaged to the text.\n\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • Jig-saw task: match up character types to description\n
  • What do you learn about character types from this exercise? Characters may not fall neatly into the catergories but may instead be a combination of several of them.\n
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  • What about Jerry Maguire’s relationship with his client, what does that tell us about each of the men?\n
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  • Practice Passage-based Question pg 27-28\n\na)What do you think the phrase “Oh no, you’re so dressed… Sorry, OK? Very sloppy” suggest about Wing’s and Audrey’s friendship? What else can you infer about their relationship with each other from this passage?\n\nb)By close reference to events before this point in the novel, how does Wing compare to his friends? What sort of relationship do they have?\n\n
  • Characterization

    1. 1. Characterization
    2. 2. Character Roles
    3. 3. Character RolesMAIN Characters
    4. 4. Character RolesMAIN Characters Central character in the story
    5. 5. Character RolesMAIN Characters Central character in the story Responsible for driving the plot forward.
    6. 6. Character RolesMAIN Characters Central character in the story Responsible for driving the plot forward.MINOR Characters
    7. 7. Character RolesMAIN Characters Central character in the story Responsible for driving the plot forward.MINOR Characters Do not play significant roles in the plot.
    8. 8. Character RolesMAIN Characters Central character in the story Responsible for driving the plot forward.MINOR Characters Do not play significant roles in the plot. To complement main characters
    9. 9. Character RolesMAIN Characters Central character in the story Responsible for driving the plot forward.MINOR Characters Do not play significant roles in the plot. To complement main charactersWill the story be significantly affected if the character is taken outof the story?
    10. 10. Mains or Minors?
    11. 11. Mains or Minors?
    12. 12. Mains or Minors?
    13. 13. Mains or Minors?
    14. 14. Character Purposes
    15. 15. Character PurposesReaders understand the storyline, issues and underlyingmessages through the characters. Characters show the readerwhat the story is about.
    16. 16. Character PurposesReaders understand the storyline, issues and underlyingmessages through the characters. Characters show the readerwhat the story is about.Readers become emotionally connected to the text through thecharacters. When the main character is happy, we feel happy.
    17. 17. Character PurposesReaders understand the storyline, issues and underlyingmessages through the characters. Characters show the readerwhat the story is about.Readers become emotionally connected to the text through thecharacters. When the main character is happy, we feel happy.Good stories have strong, complex, believable characters.
    18. 18. Character Function
    19. 19. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    20. 20. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    21. 21. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    22. 22. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    23. 23. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    24. 24. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    25. 25. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    26. 26. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    27. 27. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    28. 28. Character Function Type Description Protagonist Main character Antagonist Opposing force to main characterRound characters Complex & changing personalities Flat characters Predictable, easily classifiable
    29. 29. Character Function
    30. 30. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    31. 31. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    32. 32. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    33. 33. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    34. 34. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    35. 35. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    36. 36. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    37. 37. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    38. 38. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    39. 39. Character Function Type Description Narrator Person who tells the storyTroublemaker Person or group who causes a problem Catalyst Character who accelerates the process or event Mentor Person who helps the main character
    40. 40. Who plays what in Spiderman?
    41. 41. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    42. 42. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    43. 43. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    44. 44. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    45. 45. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    46. 46. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    47. 47. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    48. 48. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    49. 49. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    50. 50. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    51. 51. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    52. 52. Who plays what in Spiderman? Character Type Spiderman Protagonist Green Goblin Troublemaker / Antagonist Ben Parker Mentor Mary Jane Watson Round character May Parker Catalyst
    53. 53. Who plays what in Heartland? Character Type Wing Protagonist Chloe Joshua Madam Lee Sham Audrey
    54. 54. What can we learn from characters?
    55. 55. What can we learn from characters?Character Analysis: making informed choices about thecharacters inner personality through looking at outwardappearance or behavioral characteristics.
    56. 56. What can we learn from characters?Character Analysis: making informed choices about thecharacters inner personality through looking at outwardappearance or behavioral characteristics.To understand hidden motivations behind what they say/do
    57. 57. What can we learn from characters?Character Analysis: making informed choices about thecharacters inner personality through looking at outwardappearance or behavioral characteristics.To understand hidden motivations behind what they say/doTo know why they behave in a certain way
    58. 58. What can we learn from characters?Character Analysis: making informed choices about thecharacters inner personality through looking at outwardappearance or behavioral characteristics.To understand hidden motivations behind what they say/doTo know why they behave in a certain wayTo understand their situation and background
    59. 59. Character Analysis: Authorial Intention
    60. 60. Character Analysis: Authorial Intention What does the author have to say?
    61. 61. Character Analysis: Authorial Intention What does the author have to say? The author himself
    62. 62. Character Analysis: Authorial Intention What does the author have to say? The author himself What do other people have to say?
    63. 63. Character Analysis: Authorial Intention What does the author have to say? The author himself What do other people have to say? Character names
    64. 64. Father & Son by Catherine Lim
    65. 65. Father & Son by Catherine LimIn school he was neither happy nor unhappy. He avoided thoseboys who teased him and tried to touch him. There was one, abrutal-looking fellow with a powerful, atheletic body, whostalked him during recess to tease him... He always did his workwell, although he never shone. He was always polite so histeachers had no cause to be dissatified with him.
    66. 66. What can you infer about the person?
    67. 67. What can you infer about the person?
    68. 68. What can you infer about the person?
    69. 69. What can you tellabout the personality of each person?
    70. 70. What can you tellabout the personality of each person?
    71. 71. What can you tellabout the personality of each person?
    72. 72. What can you tellabout the personality of each person?
    73. 73. What can you tellabout the personality of each person?
    74. 74. ApplicationEach group is to focus on any chapter covered so far inHeartland and brainstorm possibles words to describe thecharacters in a table like the following: Trait Action/Feeling Evidence/page Had to be asked about Introverted Pg.... his CMPB trip
    75. 75. What can you tell about these 2characters based on their actions and behavior?
    76. 76. I don’t remember any of this at all! What is MrsLy-ann saying?
    77. 77. RelationshipsIndicators of a character’s relationship Eg hypocrite if he behaves differently in the presence of others.What other characters think of the main character in question.See pg 173
    78. 78. ApplicationExercise 15FCharacter analysis of Velan Background, Situation, Hidden Motives, PersonalityDescribe relationship between Velan and his Father
    79. 79. Exercise 15G
    80. 80. Exercise 15GDiscuss James’ attitude toward Ethel Richards
    81. 81. Exercise 15GDiscuss James’ attitude toward Ethel Richards Disgust - intense pride in his background
    82. 82. Exercise 15GDiscuss James’ attitude toward Ethel Richards Disgust - intense pride in his background Looks down on their poverty
    83. 83. Exercise 15GDiscuss James’ attitude toward Ethel Richards Disgust - intense pride in his background Looks down on their poverty Considers them uncivilized and rough.
    84. 84. Exercise 15GDiscuss James’ attitude toward Ethel Richards Disgust - intense pride in his background Looks down on their poverty Considers them uncivilized and rough. Suspects them of poor values
    85. 85. Exercise 15G
    86. 86. Exercise 15GJames is filled with disgust toward Ethel, probably because of racial pride. Theauthor uses “geragoks” as a derogatory term used to describe Ethel’s people.
    87. 87. Exercise 15GJames is filled with disgust toward Ethel, probably because of racial pride. Theauthor uses “geragoks” as a derogatory term used to describe Ethel’s people.He also looks down on their poverty because they were “always dead broke”. Helooks down on them because they do not work for a living and constantly gambleand borrow money.
    88. 88. Exercise 15GJames is filled with disgust toward Ethel, probably because of racial pride. Theauthor uses “geragoks” as a derogatory term used to describe Ethel’s people.He also looks down on their poverty because they were “always dead broke”. Helooks down on them because they do not work for a living and constantly gambleand borrow money.He thinks they are rough and uncivilized, “always fighting”. Even their appearanceis unkempt and their behavoir ill discipline. This is probably because the parentslet them run around like wild children.
    89. 89. Exercise 15GJames is filled with disgust toward Ethel, probably because of racial pride. Theauthor uses “geragoks” as a derogatory term used to describe Ethel’s people.He also looks down on their poverty because they were “always dead broke”. Helooks down on them because they do not work for a living and constantly gambleand borrow money.He thinks they are rough and uncivilized, “always fighting”. Even their appearanceis unkempt and their behavoir ill discipline. This is probably because the parentslet them run around like wild children.His suspcicion that the radio must be stolen by them is based on poor familyupbringing as their parents “let them sit around watching card games till they fellasleep...”
    90. 90. Passage-based ExerciseHeartland page 27 - 28What do you think the phrase “oh no, you’re so dressed... Sorry,OK? Very sloppy.” suggest about Wing’s and Audrey’srelationship? What else can you infer about their relationshipwith each other from this passage?By close reference to events before this point in the novel, howdoes Wing compare to his schoolmates? What sort ofrelationship do they have?

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