Negotiation eth changes last night 11 20

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  • Women who are ready to talk about working with other women are also ready to listen & act. Success will come from an honest evaluation of our styles, strengths and workplace challenges. The more we understand and assist each other the more prepared we will be to lead. No need to become a man to get what we deserve and have rightfully achieved. We need to influence & impact the future with our intellect, values and abilities. We need to redefine what it means for women to work with women & become our best together. It is our responsibility.Your life is not fixed. It is malleable and it can be whatever you want it to be.I know this is the part where people hope for an easy fix, but there’s no solution outside of simply being proactive. Doing instead of waiting. So go and do my friends. Go, prepare, help each other & ask. Photo credit: http://inz-feelgood.deviantart.com/art/World-in-our-hands-123313569
  • http://femme-o-nomics.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/07/genderequality.jpgWhether you prevail or fail, endure or die, depends more on what you do to yourself than on what the world does to you. Jim CollinsCheck out Evaluate JudgeChanging the cultureIn industries without clear standards, men with a new MBA earn $7,000 more than women. The gap is just $2,000 in industries with clear standards. The less information is available, the worse women do in comparison to men.With the growth of small informal businesses, the decline of unions and the shift away from defined career ladders such as faculty tenure tracks, negotiation has become more important than ever. Women are at a growing disadvantage. While they need to ask, employers also need to adapt.Not sending that mass email about teaching opportunities discriminates against women. “I was director of graduate programs and I didn’t realize the impact of my actions,” Babcock said. To reduce gender discrimination, schools can:Create standard packages so less depends on negotiation.Post information openly.Announce opportunities for research funding or professional development.Avoid back-room deals.Note who asks and who doesn’t; adjust your decisions.Mentor women to speak up.Ask women what they want. Don’t await their requests.C
  • "We have found that by reaching for what appears to be the impossible, we often actually do the impossible; and even when we don't quite make it, we inevitably wind up doing much better than we would have done.“ Jack Welch"Don't be satisfied with the best you can now and the best you think you can do. The higher you aim, the more you are likely to achieve. Back up your stretch goals with ambitious self-development to ensure complete success.
  • “You’re going to come across people in your life who will say all the right words, at all the right times. But in the end, it’s always their actions you should judge them by. It’s actions, not words, that matter.” - Nicholas Sparks
  • Stand up- look around- smile- shake hands- say hello- we’re not fighting for crumbs- we learning to ask for, negotiate for what we deserve- what is available & fair if we ask and work together – this is an abundance philosophy- the more we help the more we get- the more of us that help the closer we get to our goals.
  • What’s your perspective….fairness, equity– everyone is coming from a different place – with different goalsEverything is Negotiable
  • It's all negotiable. Yet Babcock & Laschever’s research demonstrates that the majority of us don’t negotiate. We don’t even ask and it's time for that to change. This fast-paced interactive session will quickly share why we fail to ask and then move to action with steps to determine what we want, how to ask for it and how to support other women who ask. Every new position, every performance review, every award is now an opportunity to negotiate base salary, benefits, and other incentives that add to job satisfaction, improve quality of life and provide financial security. So WISA, get ready to ask! women better evaluate their worth, maximize their bargaining power, develop strategies compatible with their individual style, and help them manage the reactions and emotions that may come along during the negotiation
  • When asked to pick metaphors for the process of negotiating, men picked "winning a ballgame" and a "wrestling match," while women picked "going to the dentist.” –Babcock/LascheverFUN… EXCITING…WINNING
  • In surveys, 2.5 times more women than men said they feel "a great deal of apprehension" about negotiating. Men initiate negotiations about four times as often as women. SCARY… AVOID NEGOTIATIONS…WOMEN ARE 2/3-Saturn vehicles- sold at a fixed price Women think=Negotiating… Dentist…Photo credit:http://mamasparrow.tumblr.com/page/3
  • Women…can’t get blood from a turnipSome people see opportunities abound. The world is their oyster. For others, trying to get more than meets the eye is like squeezing blood from a turnip. “Oyster” people believe they shape their lives; “turnip” people believe life happens to them. On a scale from oysters to turnips, those near the oyster end are mostly men. Most near the turnip end are women. Oyster women… who?
  • (Org Psych Lisa Barron) Agree/Disagree“I determine my own worth & it’s up to me to make sure my organization pays me what I’m worth.”85% men agree“My worth is determined by what my organization pays me.”85% women agreeTrust- in others hands…Working women with a high internal locus of control believe that their success is affected by their own actions. They are generally more achievement-oriented and self-confident, think that they can influence or fix situations, and believe that they can positively affect outcomes at work. In other words, they believe that their own actions are key determinants of their success in the workplace.“locus of control scale,” which researchers use to measure the extent to which individuals believe that their behavior influences their circumstances. The lower people score on this scale the more likely they are to believe they make life happen; they have an “internal locus of control.” Those with an “external locus of control,” the high scorers, feel that life happens to them. According to the authors, research has found that people with an internal locus of control spontaneously undertake activities to advance their own interests more than people with an external locus of control. Good leaders believe that they are the master of their successes and failures. With that mindset, they are more likely to be dynamic individuals that are constantly improving.That said, good leaders are also realistic.  Psychologists find that those individuals possessing a completely internal locus of control often experience disappointment in self and others, unmet expectations, and even depression.  The fact of the matter is that we CANNOT control every aspect of what occurs around us.  Therefore, having an understanding of an external locus of control is also important. 
  • Everything is Negotiable!Women are more pessimistic about the how much is available when they do negotiate and so they typically ask for and get less when they do negotiate—on average, 30 percent less than men. don’t realize that they can ask for what they want. It identifies the societal forces imposed on women from a young age, forcing them to focus on the needs of others rather than on their own needs. They also explore how our shared assumptions, as a society, about what constitutes appropriate female behavior20 percent of adult women (22 million people) say they never negotiate at all, even though they often recognize negotiation as appropriate and even necessary. Of course, women have a long history of being controlled by others. They couldn’t vote or own property. They were taught that only men could ask for a date or propose marriage.Feeling controlled by others is self-fulfilling, as with the students who assumed they couldn’t teach if the option hadn’t been announced. Babcock has found almost everything is negotiable, but you won’t try unless you think you have some influence on your environment. Women tend to underestimate what is available, leading them to settle for less. They also undervalue themselves and assume the first offer is all they are worth. Self-ratings of schoolgirls after performing a task were 30% to 78% below boys. Women report salary expectations up to 32% lower than men for the same job.
  • Today’s economy
  • it’s not just baby boomers who show this gender divide. Undergraduates were told they’d be paid from $3 to $10 to play Boggle. Afterward the experimenter offered $3 and asked the player if it would be all right. Eight times more men than women wanted more money.
  • Reasons Women Don’t Ask-not seeing the possibilities or options-less aggressive asks or goalsWomen tend to underestimate what is available, leading them to settle for less. They also undervalue themselves and assume the first offer is all they are worthIn one experiment, women and men negotiated the price of an item they were selling. Women settled for $44.10 when they would reap the benefit but got the price up to $50.31 when it would go to somebody else. Men got $51.20 for themselves and $46.36 to benefit another.
  • What we know for sure: Not negotiating leaves $$ on the table Not asking for enough leaves $$ on the tableImpacts future earningsMen expect to earn 13% more than women during their first year of full-time work – Babcock/Laschever
  • How do we level the playing field: Preparation, Reflection=Research #63 It’s easier to win on the right field- know the rules & get great coaching“We need women and girls to use their negotiating skills for themselves and for society to let them,” she said. It’s considered appropriate for women to negotiate for family, friends and organizations but not for self. “We need to change this or the playing field will never be level.”
  • Everything is Negotiable!!What do you really want?What do you wish for- role, responsibilities, opportunities, Life good- how could it be better?Are you doing what you do best the most?What would you change if it was within your power?
  • Sit back & really reflect on where you are and where you want to be- think big & small goalsWhat inspires you.Inspiration, on the other hand, stems from passion. It's an inside stimulus that compels action. Inspiration is a whisper, an itch, an idea that compels action for the sake of acting. Inspired action has nothing to do with "should" and everything to do with "desire" or "want." It is action for the joy of it, regardless of the outcome. Inspired action creates a desired outcome, but outcome is not what drives us. What drives us is the power & energy of enthusiasm.Photo credit:http://www.flickr.com/photos/selma90/3852873330/
  • Crap: Cherry ratioGood outweigh the badCost vs providingEffortvs achievementWhat are your cherries: momentum, autonomy, positive, trust, freedom
  • What do you want? How do you want to be rewarded… not right or wrongGoals? Personal financial, athletic, Self Improvement, Material, Philanthropic, Engagement/VolunteerEllen Heffernan- worry about what others want- can’t move forward
  • Future- what’s the plan- think in terms of what you want & deserve: Worth--- not need
  • Do what you would rather be doing! #78
  • Stop decreasing the value of what you really want- men do not apologize for this- haircuts on calendar, work outs, kids events & games… you choose- you judge
  • >Calculated risks- Sponsors: >about the future >Mentor may help you envision your next position a Sponsor opens the door, introduce opportunities for exposure>Sponsors don’t just believe in you –they believe in you more that you believe in yourself
  • Think bigger. While women may be generally willing to ask for help with small things, when it comes to asking a senior male colleague to take larger action on her behalf, Crittenden observes that many hesitate. “The obstacle of fear is much harder to overcome, and many women I encounter seem to have been socialized to think they are just not as deserving as men are,” Crittenden says. In her book, she uses the image of a lioness to communicate courage, power, and a big heart, someone who is undeterred by petty blows. “I don’t know if this is useful to everyone, but I do think we need some shorthand ways to encourage women to be braver, take more risks, and ask for more consideration,” says Crittenden.
  • Raise your hand- invite your self to the table
  • If you could have anything? EXERCISE- Think BIGIdentify what’s missing,"Don't be satisfied with the best you can now and the best you think you can do. The higher you aim, the more you are likely to achieve. Back up your stretch goals with ambitious self-development to ensure complete success.
  • More- Put your energy into what you really want – Daniel Pink ( Ellen) change paradigm
  • (57) Faye Crosby – “denial of personal disadvantage”Recognition that other members of their group have suffered discrimination but believe that they have not been treated unfairlySTORY:Top ranked musicians auditioning for symphony orchestra-used a screen = a full 50% higher probability that a woman would advanceScreen increased the chance of a woman winning a seat by 250%
  • Who decides… ready to move up- promotion what committees you are on what associations you attend- participate in what awards/recognition you receive the work you focus on – the new skills you develop do you do what you want – not just what you’re good at what training do you get/go to-this is where I can make the biggest contributionWhat can you change?What can you get rid of…Missing in your portfolio
  • What are your non-negotiables for taking a job? Core Values…Ellen-Due diligence- is about understanding and mitigating risk.Risk assessment and managementYou assess risks from three vantage points: Institutional The Position Personal
  • What are your non-negotiables for taking a job? Core Values…//Due diligence- personalFamily, choices, quality of life, weather, accessibility, servicesThe costs of a bad hire are staggering. A recent survey by Career Builder reports more than two-thirds of employers were affected by a bad hire last year, according to AOL Jobs. Of nearly 2,700 employers surveyed, 41% estimate a single bad hire cost $25,000; a quarter estimate a bad choice cost $50,000 or more — not to mention the demoralizing effect of the issue on other employees and on the new hire. Losing a job is one of the most stressful events a human can experience.To avoid that, when we make hires, we screen candidates using a list of personal characteristics we call the Non-Negotiables. First there were four. Ultimately, we've expanded the list to seven. These are the characteristics that have become the primary criteria for hiring decisions — things we value even more than skills and background. When we add people to our nearly 100-person company, these criteria are non-negotiable. The seven Non- Negotiables are Respect, Belief, Loyalty, Commitment, Trust, Courage and Gratitude.Ideal hires bring traditional and job-specific capabilities and high proficiencies in these seven core traits. However, in many cases, the Non- Negotiables have led us to make what others would consider "unusual hires." The result, for our company, has been near-zero turnover — and many employees express the desire and willingness to stay with us for life. It took us a few years before we fully embraced the concept of the Non-Negotiables as an explicit hiring goal. We always sought individuals with high character strengths and strong work ethics. In HR parlance, we looked for "athletes," and we talked about assessing the right fit through a strong "gut feeling." Since January 2011, we've gone further: We've now articulated these traits as full and formal requirements for the people we hire. Granted, it is more difficult to identify and assess character traits than concrete skills — however, the strategy we are using thus far seems to be meeting success. We ask potential candidates to tell us about situations where they have exemplified each of the non-negotiable traits. Because each candidate is interviewed by multiple leaders, we compare assessments on each of the traits. Later on, we may also move to an actual scoring system as well. We also ask the same questions of the individual's references — not the references they list on their resume, but of their former co-workers, associates and bosses that we identify independently, and who are in a position to speak open and candidly about the candidate's strengths (or weaknesses) in exhibiting these traits. Clearly, it's not an exact science — but we are finding the ways to become more precise as we grow. At times focusing on this non-traditional hiring criteria leads us to hire people with unusual backgrounds. When Kevin Batchelor — now one of our two VP's of Engineering — came to work here, he was not a programmer at all; his degrees were in theater and anthropology. Now, eight years later, his software designs are winning awards. John David King — now our EVP of Sales and Marketing — had no prior background in leading a sales organization. He had heart, spirit, and character, coupled with a law degree and a bachelor's degree in communications. We've filled our developer ranks largely through a partnership with Utah Valley University. We started by looking for interns — the right people with the right characteristics who wanted to learn how to code. One of them was a firefighter, one an electrician, and one was in the culinary program. Some were programmers by training, but only interested (or so they thought) in programming Internet games. We have a strong community focus — of our near 100 employees, 40 are or have been interns working on flexible schedules to allow them to finish their degrees. Our approach is contradictory to most conventional management wisdom, which suggests that hiring managers focus on relevant skills and experience. But it is working for us.Our company has no shortage of talent because we've trained the people we bring in with care. Our employees are respectful of each other, and as a company we strive to be respectful of others as well. In a competitive $1 billion software market we are collegial — we list our competitors' offerings along with our own products on our Facebook page, and we applaud their successes along with our own. Our hiring strategy has built a loyal base of employees during a time when the typical career path is to "keep the options open" and to be at least periodically shopping around. Our strategy will continue to be the right one for us. Perhaps it could work for other organizations as well. We look forward to your opinions and thoughts.More blog posts by David K. Williams and Mary Michelle ScottMore on: Managing peopleDavid K. Williams and Mary Michelle Scott
  • Negotiating a New Position:Carefully thought about your next career move and how that fits into your overall career goals and you have focused through an interview process now you have an offer—There is often a feeling on the part of the institution that they want to make an offer, have you accept, and be done—that works well for the institution as it is a big relief but does not so well for you as the successful applicant. With an offer in hand you there are things you need to do to set yourself up for success.You sell yourself to get the offerYou negotiate to get the right offerYou do your due diligence to decide if you are going to accept the negotiated offer
  • Due Diligence—making sure the job, the institutional culture, and your new supervisor fit your strengths and your weaknesses Why do due diligence? This is important—it is far less painful to turn down the wrong position or wrong institution than it is to try and salvage an unsalvageable situation. You start doing due diligence the minute you decide to become a candidate—a great leader is always reassessing the risks to her business practice and looking to minimize threats to success. You do extensive due diligence before you get an offer and make sure that you have acquired as much relevant information as possible before you make a commitment. You certainly negotiate for salary but you also need to consider the role, the responsibilities, the expectations, and the authority.You must approach negotiating as a positive, constructive, and collaborative part of the job offer process.
  • Write it down before you start negotiating.. Select ALL other benefits and perks you receive: 401(k)Life Insurance/DisabilityLiability InsurancePrivate Medical Insurance (PMI)Registered Retirement Savings Plan (RRSP)Paid Holidays / VacationPension PlanPaid Sick LeaveRetirement PlanPaid SabbaticalFlex-Time / Flexible ScheduleFree Drinks/Coke/Juice/WaterOptional Telecommute / Work from HomeRelocation ExpensesCell PhoneCompany Car / AutomobileCasual Dress/AtmosphereEducation/Training/Tuition/Certification ReimbursementDay CareSupplemental Maternity LeaveGym / Health Club / Fitness MembershipSupplemental Paternity LeaveRoom and BoardPets/Dog at Work Other: 
  • Goal SettingGoal setting is a process that helps you get clear on what you want, make an action plan to help you get there, launch into action, and persist until you reach your destination or find a better one.This process can significantly increase your probability of success and achieving what you want. Research studies show a direct link between goal setting and enhanced performance.Earl Nightingale, "People with goals succeed because they know where they are going. It's as simple as that."
  • The Offer:Be ready to move fast… or to wait…Weighing a job offer and negotiating salaryOwn the discomfort…Talk with HR to determine how the institution defines salary “range”CUPA and objective salary surveys (and talk with colleagues)Peer positions and regional institutionsBe ready for an initial discussion while you are on campusHave them state the range first; if forced, give a wide rangeDon’t be afraid to negotiate high; hiring authorities often expect you to counter offer
  • Let’s talk about these six points: Plan—what are your needs and concerns and what do see as the institution’s needs and concerns—here is where you decide what you absolutely must have and what you are willing to give up Get Started—begin with outlining your areas of agreement—leading with that creates flow; there is also a process for disagreeing—state your position, support your position with information, and listen to the other person’s position and probe for understanding—you don’t need to challenge you just need to listen Clarify positions—especially around salary –do your homework and know what the competitive salary is for the position; know your walk away number, know the number you want to accept, and know your lead number; The institution has a walk away number as well and if you hit that number they could well walk away and not even discuss the position; That is different than their maximum acceptable number and,That number is different from their expected number—that is the number where they believe the deal will be made. Also consider though the roles and responsibilities of the position—Can you be successful in this position? Do you have the resources (money, staff, time)? Do you have the authority or the support? Is what the institution wants to achieve reasonable? Find alternatives—many times it is not about the money—sometimes it is vacation time, consulting opportunities, support for professional development, etc. Find agreement—propose, concede, summarize and test your agreement Implement—you have the details in hand and are willing to move forward—you must do what you say you are going to do, you need to communicate, and you need to deliver
  • Clarify positions—especially around salary –do your homework and know what the competitive salary is for the position; know your walk away number, know the number you want to accept, and know your lead number; The institution has a walk away number as well and if you hit that number they could well walk away and not even discuss the position; That is different than their maximum acceptable number and,That number is different from their expected number—that is the number where they believe the deal will be made.
  • Salary If you’re asking for a raise in your current position, be sure to approach it not as why you need a raise, by rather, why you deserve a raise.  Gather information on salary (the “go in prepared” tactic):   Chronicle salary survey for ranges CUPA salary survey Information from professional associations (NASPA) Bonuses for longevity or for meeting set goals Signing bonus (5 to 15% of salary) Talk to colleagues   Use the web for cost of living calculators (www.homefair.com)“Your offer is very interesting and I am excited about joining your team. However, based on my expertise and proven ability to produce results, I anticipated the offer would be somewhat higher. Do you have room to move?”
  • Work Life BalanceFlexible schedulesJob sharingTelecommutingBroader Family Leave Act policiesEmployee Assistance PlansQuality of Life Questions Relocation package—assistance with real estate firm on both endsTemporary housing assistance—tax consequencesReal Estate/Cost of Living issuesSchool systems Opportunities for spouse/partner Institutions are more and more beginning to look at for profit business for models to attract and retain high performing and high potential staff. They are investing in leadership development, mentoring, career planning for staff and offering a “rewards” orientation for performance.
  • Benefits:Compare benefitsRetirement Cost of LivingTax issues  Benefits to consider/ask about:Paid sabbaticalsVacation timeFlexible benefitsDomestic partner benefitsTime off for consultingRetirement plans---waiting periods waived or immediate vestingJob assistance for spouse or partnerRelocation costsTuition remission—broadly definedTechnology allowancesSome interesting ones: airline club membership, country club memberships, clothing allowances, automobile lease
  • Other interesting benefits: Negotiate a multi-year contract with a roll-over clause for the multiple-yearsYour health, dental, vision, disability insurance paid and the same insurance for both partner and dependents—tax consequencesTravel allowance, for conferences as well as any travel required for the position (like if you are part of a university or community college system and must work on different campuses)Negotiating faculty appointment (with tenure if eligible) Annual budget to entertain potential donors, staff or students A personal transportation budget/allowance or use of a vehicleAthletics tickets—really?One colleague moved from full-time faculty to an executive level administration position half-time and faculty half-time. The negotiations allowed him to receive all the salary increases designated for faculty after he returned to that position full-time.Full contribution to pension fund or additional contributions made while employed—depends on public or privateProfessional association and/or community organization duesRecreational memberships (golf club, tennis club, rec center, country club, spa)—need to be VERY careful on this oneAdditional vacation days--sometimesAdditional retirement benefits (insurance, bonus, “golden parachute”)—more than likely could negotiate for a lump sumDetermine what university policy is for being removed from a position. Negotiate a funded year to find another position if removed from yours. Annual "executive" physicals Ask for half of the sick days you had accumulated at your previous position to you at the new job—probably never happen—see asking for more vacation or release timeA designated number of consulting days that you could take without using vacation but would be compensated forAdditional life insurance—tax consequencesPaid moving expenses—usually
  • Negotiating Role and Responsibility Also consider though the roles and responsibilities of the position—Can you be successful in this position? Do you have the resources (money, staff, time)? Do you have the authority or the support? Is what the institution wants to achieve reasonable?  Increased divisional budget or other resources for the divisionhttp://www.quicksprout.com/2012/02/02/a-step-by-step-guide-to-winning-almost-every-single-negotiation/
  • Cone of SilenceMake them state the range firstIf forced, give a WIDE rangeCounteroffer!Silent treatment tacticSalary plus perks tacticPlanGet StartedClarify positionsFind alternativesFind agreement Implement
  • Negotiating Role,Responsibility, and Salary as the Internal CandidateAvoid taking title interim/actingIt is just a lengthy job interviewConstituents feel like they know what you can and can’t doYou have been painted with the brush of the person who hired you—good or bad 
  • Expanded access to key information = IntelligenceA experienced network=ConnectionsAbility to ask=BoldnessWomen don’t ask for as much because they lack the information- in situations where the pay scales are not widely known the gap between what women are offered are 3X as large as those where the pay is publicized and known. Women are at greater risk when they work in a unique situation where comparisons are hard to makeGather information before you need it- you get what you give-Ask men as well as womenWhen no information is available women paid 27% more than men when the information was available the gap closed with the women play 8% more than men (ask for it p.153)
  • Check out Evaluate JudgeChanging the cultureIn industries without clear standards, men with a new MBA earn $7,000 more than women. The gap is just $2,000 in industries with clear standards. The less information is available, the worse women do in comparison to men.With the growth of small informal businesses, the decline of unions and the shift away from defined career ladders such as faculty tenure tracks, negotiation has become more important than ever. Women are at a growing disadvantage. While they need to ask, employers also need to adapt.Not sending that mass email about teaching opportunities discriminates against women. “I was director of graduate programs and I didn’t realize the impact of my actions,” Babcock said. To reduce gender discrimination, schools can:Create standard packages so less depends on negotiation.Post information openly.Announce opportunities for research funding or professional development.Avoid back-room deals.Note who asks and who doesn’t; adjust your decisions.Mentor women to speak up.Ask women what they want. Don’t await their requests.C
  • http://a11news.com/67/softball-sportsmanship/Bias without malice pg 64- adjust scalesWhile women need to ask, employers also need to adapt.Not sending that mass email about teaching opportunities discriminates against women. “I was director of graduate programs and I didn’t realize the impact of my actions,” Babcock said. To reduce gender discrimination, schools can:Create standard packages so less depends on negotiation.Post information openly.Announce opportunities for research funding or professional development.Avoid back-room deals.Note who asks and who doesn’t; adjust your decisions.Mentor women to speak up.Ask women what they want. Don’t await their requests.
  • Negotiation eth changes last night 11 20

    1. 1. Our Values, Our Value & The Ask @sjgsearch @tbump
    2. 2. Overview• Our Value• Our Values• Due Diligence• Negotiating• Employee Benefits• Responsibility, Authority & Resources• Pay it Forward
    3. 3. Our Value
    4. 4. Negotiation describes any communication processbetween individuals that is intended to reach acompromise or agreement to the satisfaction of both parties.
    5. 5. Our Values
    6. 6. Due Diligence
    7. 7. Ideal Offered Acceptable Reminders….Compensation Salary Professional Development Relocation HousingPaid Leave Vacation/PTO Maternity/Paternity Leave Release timeBenefits Retirement/401K Care Plans (child/elderly) Insurance (health, life, disability) Tuition Meal Plan (s)Perks Parking Phone/Home computer/iPad Recreation Center passTickets
    8. 8. Negotiating
    9. 9. Benefits
    10. 10. Responsibility Authority, & Resources
    11. 11. Pay it Forward
    12. 12. ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman
    13. 13. ZITS By Jerry Scott & Jim Borgman

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