CDECA Toronto Chapter Presentation Feb 5, 2013

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  • In your opening, establish the relevancy of the topic to the audience. Give a brief preview of the presentation and establish value for the listeners. Take into account your audience’s interest and expertise in the topic when choosing your vocabulary, examples, and illustrations. Focus on the importance of the topic to your audience, and you will have more attentive listeners.
  • Frequently, presenters must deliver material of a technical nature to an audience unfamiliar with the topic or vocabulary. The material may be complex or heavy with detail. To present technical material effectively, use the following guidelines from Dale Carnegie Training®.   Consider the amount of time available and prepare to organize your material. Narrow your topic. Divide your presentation into clear segments. Follow a logical progression. Maintain your focus throughout. Close the presentation with a summary, repetition of the key steps, or a logical conclusion.   Keep your audience in mind at all times. For example, be sure data is clear and information is relevant. Keep the level of detail and vocabulary appropriate for the audience. Use visuals to support key points or steps. Keep alert to the needs of your listeners, and you will have a more receptive audience.
  • In your opening, establish the relevancy of the topic to the audience. Give a brief preview of the presentation and establish value for the listeners. Take into account your audience’s interest and expertise in the topic when choosing your vocabulary, examples, and illustrations. Focus on the importance of the topic to your audience, and you will have more attentive listeners.
  • In your opening, establish the relevancy of the topic to the audience. Give a brief preview of the presentation and establish value for the listeners. Take into account your audience’s interest and expertise in the topic when choosing your vocabulary, examples, and illustrations. Focus on the importance of the topic to your audience, and you will have more attentive listeners.
  • In your opening, establish the relevancy of the topic to the audience. Give a brief preview of the presentation and establish value for the listeners. Take into account your audience’s interest and expertise in the topic when choosing your vocabulary, examples, and illustrations. Focus on the importance of the topic to your audience, and you will have more attentive listeners.
  • In your opening, establish the relevancy of the topic to the audience. Give a brief preview of the presentation and establish value for the listeners. Take into account your audience’s interest and expertise in the topic when choosing your vocabulary, examples, and illustrations. Focus on the importance of the topic to your audience, and you will have more attentive listeners.
  • If you have several points, steps, or key ideas use multiple slides. Determine if your audience is to understand a new idea, learn a process, or receive greater depth to a familiar concept. Back up each point with adequate explanation. As appropriate, supplement your presentation with technical support data in hard copy or on disc, e-mail, or the Internet. Develop each point adequately to communicate with your audience.
  • If you have several points, steps, or key ideas use multiple slides. Determine if your audience is to understand a new idea, learn a process, or receive greater depth to a familiar concept. Back up each point with adequate explanation. As appropriate, supplement your presentation with technical support data in hard copy or on disc, e-mail, or the Internet. Develop each point adequately to communicate with your audience.
  • CDECA Toronto Chapter Presentation Feb 5, 2013

    1. 1. Announcement Jan. 30, 2013  Dont miss the next Toronto Chapter Meeting!  When: Tuesday, February 5, 2013 at 9 a.m. Where: Designers Walk Resource Centre RSVP: by Friday, February 1 to Andrea Santos andrea@iwasheredesigns.com  On Tuesday, February 5, 2013 well welcome Anthony Boyko, Manager, Building Code Inspections, City of Markham and instructor at George Brown College for a discussion on the Ontario Building Code and how it relates to our decorating and design projects.  With many years in the industry, Tony will share insights with us on topics such as:  New requirements for the 2012 Building Code applicable to homes  Bathroom renovations and applicable building code requirements  Kitchen renovation and applicable building code requirements  Electrical code requirements for Kitchens and Bathrooms  Looking forward to seeing you at this informative event. Come armed with all of your OBC questions!  CDECA Toronto Executive
    2. 2. Toronto Chapter CDECA The Ontario Building Code and Design and Decorating Projects
    3. 3. Questions??? Please ask them during the presentation
    4. 4. Who Am I?  I am a member of CDECA as an educator  I am a part-time professor at GBC in the Interior Decorating Program  7 years  Course has expanded from 5 nights to 7 nights  New topics include electrical and beam design  I am the Manager of Building Inspections for the City of Markham  In 2011 2nd highest in construction activity in Ontario, over 1.5 billion in construction in 2012  I am glad to be here
    5. 5. Objective of the GBC Course  To expand the profession of Interior Decoration by including Building Code knowledge for the use by participants in their business or work for others  To explain how the work of an interior decorator can compete in today’s design industry  To provide the relevant Building Code knowledge so that decorators can implement the information in their work  To think like a building official Home of the Week  Course book to give away today
    6. 6. Introduction to the Building Code forInterior Decorators at GBC
    7. 7. Agenda  What’s New for the 2012 Ontario Building Code (OBC)  Bathroom Renovations and the OBC  Break  Kitchen Renovations and the OBC  Ontario Electrical Safety Code for Bathrooms and Kitchens
    8. 8. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  On November 2, 2012, Ontario Regulation 332/12 was filed to introduce the new Building Code.  Most of the new Building Code will come into force on Jan. 1, 2014. However, certain requirements will come into force later on Jan. 1, 2015 and Jan. 1, 2017.
    9. 9. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  The new Building Code substantially improves energy-efficiency requirements and makes Ontario one of the leading jurisdictions in North America for water conservation.
    10. 10. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings So, what are some of the major changes for home construction or renovation under the 2012 Ontario Building Code? There were over 700 technical changes, but mostly minor grammatical changes, today we will review the most important for your profession
    11. 11. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Site-BuiltWindow, Doors and Skylights, Subsection 9.7.5. Windows that are made on site are now regulated.  Height of handrails above nosing to be not less than 865 mm (old 800 mm) and not more than 965 mm. Smaller range and an increased lowest height of handrail Subsection 9.8.7.
    12. 12. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings The range of the height of the handrail has been reduced to 865 mm to 965 mm 865
    13. 13. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Specific guard requirements for compliance with the climbability provisions of the OBC have been removed, Subsection 9.8.6.  However, your guard designs must still be not climbable. The Province has removed provisions, that a designer could have used to achieve compliance.
    14. 14. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings The guard detail cannot create a ladder effect making the elements climbable
    15. 15. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Exit signs are changing, Subsection 9.9.11.  We will still have exit signs, but the familiar red and white signs will be replaced with a green pictogram and white or lightly tinted graphical symbol.
    16. 16. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Smoke Alarm Changes, Subsection 9.10.19.  Still required on all floor levels, including the basement, but now must be installed in each sleeping room,  Sound pattern to be temporal or combination temporal and voice relay,  Provided with a battery as an alternative source of power, 7 hours and 4 minutes sounding,  Mandatory silencing of the alarm capabilities for 10 minutes
    17. 17. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings
    18. 18. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Spray-applied polyurethane insulation, Subsection 9.25.4.  Where the foam insulation functions as the vapour barrier, it is required to be sufficiently thick so that condensation will not form on the foam or interior wall surface.  This is applicable to 2lb spray foam, not ½ lb and must be a minimum of 50 mm thick.
    19. 19. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings White/creamy colour ½ lb light density spray foam Any colour but white/creamy 2 lb medium density spray foam
    20. 20. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  The ceramic tile installation prescribed requirements have been deleted from the OBC, Subsection 9.30.2. Now;  Set in a mortar bed, or  Applied to a sound smooth base with a suitable adhesive  This opens the door for use of products such as Schulter Systems. More on this later in the presentation
    21. 21. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Dwellings may be served by a drainless composting toilet, Subsection 9.31.4.  Choice of a water closet or drainless composting toilet.
    22. 22. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Electricalstorage-type service heaters must have a set storage temperature of 600C, Subsection 9.31.6.  To ensure adequate heat to kill any bacteria (Legionella) that may develop in the water as a result of being stored at low temperatures (200C to 450C)
    23. 23. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Furnace will be allowed to be designed for dwellings that are much tighter in terms of building envelope, permitting smaller furnaces sizes, Subsection 9.33.2. Smaller furnaces = Efficient heating = Saving fuel
    24. 24. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Carbon Monoxide detectors to be installed on or near the ceiling or at the manufacturer’s recommended height, Subsection 9.33.4.  Previously no requirement for location, but more were ceiling mounted as per the manufacturer’s instructions, why is that important?
    25. 25. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Symptoms of Carbon Monoxide Poisoning (1)  Be sure that all members of your family know the symptoms of CO poisoning:  Mild Exposure  Flu-like symptoms such as headache, running nose, sore eyes, etc.  Medium Exposure  Drowsiness, dizziness, vomiting. The sense of disorientation and confusion may make it difficult for some victims to make rational decisions like leaving the home or calling for assistance.  Extreme Exposure  Unconsciousness, brain damage, death.  Continued Low-level Exposure to CO  While this may be not lead to observable symptoms, you should still avoid such exposure. (1) CMHC
    26. 26. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  Stud Wall Reinforcement, Subsection 9.5.2.  In addition to providing reinforcement within wall studs for a water closet to permit the future installation of grab bars, now the same must be built for a shower or bathtub
    27. 27. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings
    28. 28. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  7.1.5.3. Water Distribution Systems  (2) Storm sewage or greywater that is free of solids and treated to conform to Article 7.7.4.1. is permitted to be used as a water supply for, (a) water closets, (b) urinals, (c) sub-surface irrigation
    29. 29. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings Toilets, urinals and trap seals to be supplied by recycling greywater rather than by the potable water supply system. Greywater is the discharge from fixtures other that toilets, urinals or other sanitary unit.
    30. 30. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings  7.1.5.3.  Water Distribution Systems  (3)  Rainwater that is free of solids and treated to conform to Article 7.7.4.1. is permitted to be used as a water supply for,  (a) clothes washers,  (b) laundry trays,  (c) mop sinks,  (d) bedpan washers,  (e) water closets,  (f) urinals,  (g) hose bibbs,  (h) sub-surface irrigation
    31. 31. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings Group C Occupancies (dwellings) Water Closets(2) 2006 2012 (1) Water closets which provide a dual flush cycle option of both 4.1 LPF or less and 6.0 LPF are deemed to comply. (2) Do not apply to a fixture located in an existing building where the chief building official is satisfied that compliance with the requirement is impracticable because of maintenance or operational difficulties.
    32. 32. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings Maximum Water Flow Rates for Faucets and Shower Heads 2006 2012
    33. 33. Major ChangesPart 9 Housing and Small Buildings 9.5 L/min complies with the 2006 Code but not the 2012 (7.6 L/min)
    34. 34. Bathroom Renovations
    35. 35. Bathroom Renovations First Things First!  A building permit is required for the following work;  Any structural components that are affected by the renovation  Relocating of plumbing fixtures
    36. 36. Bathroom Renovations  Work that is governed by the Building Code even if a permit is not issued;  Glass shower or steam room enclosures  Flooring; ceramic, porcelain.  Supply fittings (faucets, taps)  Fixtures (water closets, basins, bathtubs)  Walls surrounding bathtubs  Walls and floors of shower stalls  Water Temperature control
    37. 37. Bathroom Renovations  9.5.9.1.  Space to Accommodate Fixtures  (1)  In every dwelling unit an enclosed space of sufficient size shall be provided to accommodate a water closet, lavatory and bathtub or shower stall.  9.5.9.2.  Doors to Rooms Containing Water  Closets  (1)  A door shall be provided to each room containing a water closet within a dwelling unit.
    38. 38. Bathroom Renovations An ensuite bathroom for the master bedroom does not require a door. However, the water closet should be located in a separate room within the ensuite
    39. 39. Bathroom Renovations  9.6.6.5.  Glass for Shower or Bathtub  Enclosures  (1)  Glassother than safety glass shall not be used for a shower or bathtub enclosure.
    40. 40. Bathroom Renovations Safety Glass Required
    41. 41. Bathroom Renovations  9.30.6.  Ceramic Tile  9.30.6.1.  Substrate  (1)  Ceramic tile shall be set in a mortar bed or applied to a sound smooth base with a suitable adhesive.  (2)  Panel-type subfloor to which ceramic tile is to be applied with adhesive shall have its edges supported according to Article 9.23.14.3.
    42. 42. Bathroom Renovations Thin Set Method “applied to a sound smooth base with a suitable adhesive” Considered the least expensive method
    43. 43. Bathroom Renovations ???? “applied to a sound smooth base with a suitable adhesive”
    44. 44. Bathroom Renovations Schluter-DITRA System
    45. 45. Bathroom Renovations  7.2.2.3.  Showers  (1)  Shower receptors shall be constructed and arranged so that water cannot leak through the walls or floor.
    46. 46. Bathroom Renovations Traditional construction shower floor construction with flexible rubber-based material for shower pan
    47. 47. Bathroom Renovations Moisture resistant gypsum board (green or grey) is the least recommended but still complies with the Building Code
    48. 48. Bathroom Renovations Concrete or cement board Better than green board
    49. 49. Bathroom Renovations Schluter®-KERDI-SHOWER-ST
    50. 50. Bathroom Renovations  7.6.5.1.  Maximum Temperature of Hot  Water  (1)  Except as provided in Sentences (2) and 7.6.5.3.(1), the maximum temperature of hot water supplied by fittings to fixtures in a residential occupancy shall not exceed 49°C.  (2)  Sentence (1) does not apply to hot water supplied to installed dishwashers or clothes washers.
    51. 51. Bathroom Renovations Hot water mixing valve
    52. 52. Bathroom Renovations  7.2.2.2.  Conformance to Standards  (2)  Vitreous china fixtures shall conform to ASME A112.19.2/CAN/CSA-B45.1, “Ceramic Plumbing Fixtures”.  (3)  Enamelled cast iron fixtures shall conform to ASME A112.19.1/CAN/CSA-B45.2, “Enamelled Cast Iron and Enamelled Steel Plumbing Fixtures”.  (4)  Porcelain enamelled steel fixtures shall conform to ASME A112.19.1/CAN/CSA- B45.2, “Enamelled Cast Iron and Enamelled Steel Plumbing Fixtures”.  (5)  Stainless steel fixtures shall conform to ASME A112.19.3/CAN/CSA-B45.4, “Stainless Steel Plumbing Fixtures”.  (6)  Plastic fixtures shall conform to CAN/CSA-B45.5, “Plastic Plumbing Fixtures”.  (7)  Hydromassage bathtubs shall conform to CAN/CSA-B45.10, “Hydromassage Bathtubs”.  7.2.10.6.  Supply and Waste Fittings  (1)  Supply fittings shall conform to ASME A112.18.1 / CAN/CSA-B125.1, “Plumbing Supply Fittings” or CAN/CSA-B125.3, “Plumbing Fittings”.  7.6.4.2.  Plumbing Fixtures  (1)  Water closets and urinals shall be certified to CAN/CSA-B45.0, “General Requirements for Plumbing Fixtures”.
    53. 53. Bathroom Renovations 2012 code requires 8.35 L/min as a maximum
    54. 54. Bathroom Renovations CSA International Approval Agency - The designer’s role within the dotted line area is very important. Selecting an approved product for your client occurs at this stage of product development.
    55. 55. Bathroom Renovations So called ‘off-shore’ supply fitting (faucet)
    56. 56. Bathroom Renovations CSA logo may be embossed or a sticker
    57. 57. Bathroom Renovations Old existing bathroom fans should be replaced as part of project design
    58. 58. Bathroom Renovations Available at Home Depot
    59. 59. Bathroom Renovations  7.6.1.3.  Control and Shut-off Valves  (1)  A building control valve shall be provided,  (a) on every water service pipe at the location where the water service pipe enters the building,  7.6.1.5.  Water Closets  (1)  Every water closet shall be provided with a shut-off valve on its water supply pipe.  7.6.1.9.  Protection for Exterior Water Supply  (1)  Every pipe that passes through an exterior wall to supply water to the exterior of the building shall be provided with,  (a) a frost-proof hydrant with a separate shut-off valve located inside the building, or  (b) a stop-and-waste cock located inside the building and close to the wall.
    60. 60. Bathroom Renovations Shut off valves are only required at; Building Control Valve Water closets Exterior Wall Supply
    61. 61. Bathroom Renovations What are the Code Issues?
    62. 62. Bathroom Recap … There is not a requirement for slip-resistant floors in dwellings Name the Code Issues
    63. 63. Break Next ...  Kitchen Renovations and the OBC  Ontario Electrical Safety Code for Bathrooms and Kitchens
    64. 64. Kitchen Renovations
    65. 65. Kitchen Renovations Again, First Things First!  A building permit is required for the following work;  Any structural components that are affected by the renovation, and  Relocating of plumbing fixtures
    66. 66. Kitchen Renovations  Work that is governed by the Building Code even if a permit is not issued;  Replacement of cabinets  Flooring; ceramic, porcelain, wood!  Supply fittings (faucets, taps)  Fixtures (sinks, garburators, dishwashers)  Water Temperature control
    67. 67. Kitchen Renovations Why is relocating a plumbing fixture an issue? Most illegal installations are not vented properly or not vented at all causing the fixture to not drain properly, which could lead to sewer gas entering the home.
    68. 68. Kitchen Renovations Vertical Clearances above Ranges
    69. 69. Kitchen Renovations Protection Around Ranges Fire demonstration
    70. 70. Kitchen Renovations Wood range hoods should be lined with metal to allow for cleaning and guard against fire
    71. 71. Kitchen Renovations Kitchen range hood fans must be approved for efficiency and effectiveness
    72. 72. Kitchen Renovations Flooring Ceramic or porcelain tile may be laid on ½ concrete
    73. 73. Kitchen Renovations Flooring Use of systems that have been engineered to prevent tile and grout cracking and dislodging is recommended. This system is approved by the Schluter-DITRA Building Code
    74. 74. Kitchen Renovations  9.30.1.2.  Water Resistance  (1)  Finished flooring in bathrooms, kitchens, public entrance halls, laundry and general storage areas shall consist of resilient flooring, felted-synthetic-fibre floor coverings, concrete, terrazzo, ceramic tile, mastic or other types of flooring providing similar degrees of water resistance.
    75. 75. Kitchen Renovations Even though wood is not recognized as a water resistant finish, most building departments will allow wood floors in kitchens, but you should advise your client of potential problems
    76. 76. Kitchen Renovations Garburators are usually not permitted under municipal sewer use by-laws
    77. 77. Kitchen Renovations The Province has stated that when a supply fitting (faucet) is replaced, the temperature of the hot water must not exceed 490C once the new faucet is installed
    78. 78. Kitchen Renovations Hot Water Temperature Control Can be a mixing valve or at the source Safe Kids Canada
    79. 79. Kitchen Renovations Flooring Sinks Faucets Receptacles Lighting Island Vent hood Windows What are the Code Issues including Electrical ?
    80. 80. Ontario Electrical Safety Code  The objective of the Ontario Electrical Safety Code (OESC);  Isto establish safety standards for the installation and maintenance of electrical equipment.
    81. 81. Ontario Electrical Safety Code  The bottom line:  Using a proper design layout of fixtures, equipment and receptacles will, in part, ensure an essentially safe installation and compliance with the requirements of the OESC.
    82. 82. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Bathrooms  Receptacles Installed In Bathrooms  At least one receptacle is required to be installed in bathrooms, washrooms, power rooms and ensuites containing a wash basin.  Receptacles installed in bathrooms should be located at least 500 mm from the bathtub or shower stall. However, a one metre distance is preferred. This distance is measured horizontally from the receptacle to the face of the bathtub or shower stall.  There are no other requirements for the number or location of receptacles in bathrooms other than the issue previously noted.
    83. 83. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Bathrooms The receptacle and switch located on the stud wall Receptacle on the right side in this photo are at distance of at least 500 mm from the bathtub location. Bathtub Switch Location
    84. 84. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Bathrooms  Luminaires in Damp or Wet Locations  A luminaire may be installed in a shower or above a bathtub.  However, the fixture must be approved for a wet location and installed as per the manufacturer’s instructions.  Ground fault circuit interrupter (GFCI) protection is not required for the light fixture, unless required by the fixture manufacturer.
    85. 85. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Bathrooms The luminaire in this photo has been approved for use in a wet or damp location, such as this shower. Notice the black ring between the ceiling finish and the white luminaire housing. This is a gasket so that a tight joint is formed prohibiting moisture from accessing the electrical components.
    86. 86. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Bathrooms Is this light fixture permitted in this location? What are the requirements related to its location? Wet or damp areas
    87. 87. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens  Receptacles in Kitchens  The placement or location of receptacles in kitchens is based on the appliances that could be installed and the usage of the room. For appliances,  One receptacle is required for each refrigerator and  Where a gas supply piping or gas connection outlet has been provided for a gas range, one receptacle is also required. The receptacle for the gas range location must not be more than 130 mm from the floor and near the mid-point of the range location measured along the floor line.
    88. 88. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Range receptacle is not required where there is a built-in gas or electric cook top or oven Gas supply pipe This duplex receptacle is required when there is space for a free standing range when a gas supply pipe is installed
    89. 89. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens  Receptacles in Kitchens  For the proper use of the kitchen, a sufficient number of receptacles (15A split or 20A T-slot) must be located along the wall behind the counter work surfaces so that no point along the wall is more than 900 mm from a receptacle measured horizontally along the wall line.  Therefore, the location of the receptacles cannot exceed a maximum of 1800 mm apart.
    90. 90. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Receptacle Maximum distance from receptacle to If this isolated pantry is 1800 mm work surface is less than 300 mm in width a Receptacle receptacle is not required
    91. 91. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Receptacles may be installed face down, under the cabinet, instead of on the wall. This is due to the recent use of glass backsplashes
    92. 92. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens  Receptacles in Kitchens  A permanently fixed island counter requires at least one receptacle when the island is at least 600 mm for the long dimension and 300 mm for the short dimension.  For small islands or when the island has equipment or a sink that covers almost the entire counter space, a receptacle is not required.  Since the receptacle cannot be located in or on the work surface, it must be located on the side of the island cabinet, just under the work surface, ie. Not more than 300 mm below the counter work surface. This will allow standard kitchen appliance cords to reach the receptacle.  You may be able to install a receptacle in a partial wall or raised backsplash where they are available above the counter. Check with your local electrical inspector.
    93. 93. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens 1. Greater than 300 mm and 2. Greater 2 than 600 mm between edge of 11 counter and sink Island Counter – Receptacle Required
    94. 94. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Receptacles must be within 300 mm of the top of the counter to facilitate easy reach of appliance Receptacle cords that are 900 mm long Where islands have a cantilever extension no more than 150 mm, a receptacle is permitted on the underside within 300 mm of the top of the counter
    95. 95. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Receptacle is not required in an island counter where there is less than 300 mm on both sides and in front of the stove or sink Note: a movable island does not require a receptacle. It would not have a stove or sink
    96. 96. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Where there is 300 mm or greater counter space on each side and in front of the sink, then it is considered one work surface and only one receptacle is required
    97. 97. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Where there is 300 mm or greater counter space on each side but not in front of the sink or stove, then it is considered two separate work surfaces and two receptacles are required. This is required so an appliance cord is not laid across the sink.
    98. 98. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens  Receptacles in Kitchens  Similar to the rules for a island counter, a kitchen peninsula also requires its own receptacle.  A peninsula is a counter that is attached to the counter work surface that is attached to a wall.  An additional receptacle is required for a peninsula counter space that is at least 600 mm for the long dimension and 300 mm for the short dimension.
    99. 99. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Receptacle could have been Where the placed here peninsular is greater than 600 mm in length and 300 mm or greater in width, one Receptacle receptacle is required Length Width Kitchen Peninsular
    100. 100. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens Mini quiz: If the counter on each side of the sink is greater than 300 mm in Sink width, how many Location receptacles are required and where?
    101. 101. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens  Minimum Height of Luminaires  Any luminaire that is located less than 2.1 m above the floor and is readily accessible must be protected by a guard or location.  However, a short drop light with a flexible connection may be used in lieu of a rigid luminaire.
    102. 102. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - Kitchens The rigid connection for the luminaires on the right side over the island are permitted to be a rigid connection. The flexible connection for the luminaire over the movable table is required since the table is not permanent in nature and if moved the flexible connection will permit the luminaire to move if struck.
    103. 103. Ontario Electrical Safety Code – TR Receptacles  Tamper-Resistant Receptacles  All receptacles of CSA Configuration 5-15R and 5-20R must be tamper-resistant and marked as such. However, receptacles for the following appliances are not required to be tamper- resistant;  If the receptacle is inaccessible by locating it behind the appliance or  2 m above floor or finished grade  What is a tamper-resistant receptacle?
    104. 104. Ontario Electrical Safety Code – GFCI’s  The Ground Fault Circuit Interrupter (GFCI) Zone  A GFCI protects people by interrupted or turning off the circuit if leakage of current exceeds a range of 4 to 6 mA of current. It does this within 25 ms.  Leakage of current usually involves the body of a person who is grounded and accidentally touches the energized part of the circuit. Using electrical appliances around water can be fatal if the appliance is dropped into a sink full of water or into the running water.  Therefore, all 15 amp and 20 amp receptacles within 1.5 m of sinks, wash basins, bathtubs or shower stalls must be protected by a GFCI of the Class A type. Alternative to providing a GFCI receptacle, a GFCI circuit breaker may be provided.
    105. 105. Ontario Electrical Safety Code – GFCI’s Note 1; all 15 amp and 20 amp receptacles within 1.5 m of sinks, wash basins, bathtubs or shower stalls must be protected by a GFCI of the Class A type. Alternative to providing a GFCI receptacle, a GFCI circuit breaker may be provided.
    106. 106. Ontario Electrical Safety Code - GTK Good to Know  The wall switch that controls the luminaire is not required to be located in the same room as the luminaire.  However, in the case of a bathroom, a switch cannot be located within 1 metre of a bathtub or shower.  The switch may be located not less than 0.5 metre if protected by a GFCI Class A.  If the above is not possible, the designer may have to locate the switch outside the bathroom or change the bathroom layout
    107. 107. Kitchen Recap … Name the Code Issues
    108. 108. Building Code Resources  Ontario Municipal Affairs and Housing http://www.mah.gov.on.ca/Page7393.aspx/site4.aspx  Your Local Municipal Building Department http://www.toronto.ca/building/building_permits.htm  Network with your favourite Building Official
    109. 109. Networking  Please join our Facebook page at www.facebook.com/designers.buildingcode  Linked-In http://www.linkedin.com/profile/view?id=75280082&trk=tab_pro

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