Water Security: Leadership and Commitment

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Talk given by Shuichi Hirayama
Director for Regional Coordination
Japan Water Forum at TBLI CONFERENCE ASIA 2008.

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  • Water Security: Leadership and Commitment

    1. 1. “ TBLI CONFERENCE ASIA 2008” Water Security: Leadership and Commitment May 30, 2008 Shuichi Hirayama Director for Regional Coordination Japan Water Forum
    2. 2. Questions to Global Water Issues <ul><li>Global Water Issues; </li></ul><ul><li>Keywords; Human Basic Needs, Limited Resources, Disaster (Flood, draught, sea-level rise), Climate and Geographical Conditions, Sanitation, Pollution </li></ul><ul><li>Related Sectors & Fields; Food Production, Development and Ecosystem, Infrastructure, Environment, Finance, Technology, Trans-boundary, Policy, Law and Regulation, Public, Private, Civil Society… </li></ul><ul><li>Questions; </li></ul><ul><li>How can we raise awareness of water issues and share a determination to take concrete actions towards the resolution of water issues? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Water Security : Leadership and Commitment (ex. 1st Asia-Pacific Water Summit) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>What is the private sector's role towards the resolution of water issues? </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Direct Operations; Supply Chain and Watershed Management; Collective Action; Public Policy; Community Engagement; and Transparency (UN Global Compact Initiative; CEO Water Mandate) </li></ul></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>About Japan Water Forum </li></ul><ul><li>Global Water Issues </li></ul><ul><li>Water Security : Leadership and Commitment </li></ul><ul><li>- 1 st Asia-Pacific Water Summit - </li></ul><ul><li>UN Global Compact Initiative </li></ul><ul><li>- CEO Water Mandate – </li></ul><ul><li>Japan Water Forum in Business </li></ul>Components of Presentation
    4. 4. <ul><li>Networking </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Asia-Pacific Water Forum (APWF), Northern Water Network (NoWNET) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Partners: WWC, GWP, National & Local Gov, UN Orgs, International & Regional Orgs, Academia, Civil Society, Business Sector, Youth, etc. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Policy Recommendation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>1st Asia-Pacific Water Summit, Asia Pacific Policy Brief, 5th World Water Forum, High-Level Expert Panel on Water and Disaster </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Research </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Climate Change, IWRM, Governance, Climate Change, Disaster Management, Sanitation </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Support for Grass-Roots Activities </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Japan Water Forum Fund, Darvish Yu Water Fund </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Education & Enlightenment </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Through Theory to Practice -Training of Trainer in Disaster Preparedness- in Sri Lanka, Organizing Symposium, Seminar, Workshop, etc., Awareness Raising Activities; Water Conservation Campaign, Flood Fighting Drill Tour, Uchi-Mizu Project, Water Museum </li></ul></ul>What is Japan Water Forum?
    5. 5. Global Water Issue People in 60 countries will be facing water shortage by the middle of 21 st century (UN World Water Development 2003) 7 billion People die each year of water related diseases (UN World Water Development, 2 nd edition. 2006) 3.8 billion People do not have access to proper drinking water facilities such as aqueducts and tubewells (JMP Report, UNICEF/WHO 2006) 1.1 billion People will have suffered from food damage stemming from population increase and climate change by the middle of the 21 st century (UNU-EHS 2004) 2 billion People do not have access to proper sanitation facilities such as toilets (JMP Report, UNICEF/WHO 2006) 2.6 billion
    6. 6. source: Meeting the MDG drinking water and sanitation target : the urban and rural challenge of the decade http://www.who.int/whosis/indicators/2007ImprovedAccessWaterSanitation/en/index.html Access to safe drinking water 1.1 billion People do not have access to proper drinking water facilities such as aqueducts and tubewells Improved Drinking Water Sources Unimproved Drinking Water Sources <ul><li>Piped water into dwelling, plot or yard </li></ul><ul><li>Public tap/standpipe </li></ul><ul><li>Tubewell/borehole </li></ul><ul><li>Protected dug well </li></ul><ul><li>Protected spring </li></ul><ul><li>Rainwater collection </li></ul><ul><li>Unprotected dug well </li></ul><ul><li>Unprotected spring </li></ul><ul><li>Cart with small tank/drum </li></ul><ul><li>Bottled water </li></ul><ul><li>Tanker-truch </li></ul><ul><li>Surface water (river, dm, lake, etc) </li></ul>
    7. 7. source: Meeting the MDG drinking water and sanitation target : the urban and rural challenge of the decade http://www.who.int/whosis/indicators/2007ImprovedAccessWaterSanitation/en/index.html Access to improved sanitation 2.6 billion People do not have access to proper sanitation facilities such as toilets Improved Sanitation Facilities Unimproved Sanitation Facilities <ul><li>Flush or pour-flush to piped sewer system, septic tank and pit latrine </li></ul><ul><li>Ventilated improved pit latrine </li></ul><ul><li>Pit latrine with slab </li></ul><ul><li>Composting toilet </li></ul><ul><li>Flush or pour-flush to elsewhere </li></ul><ul><li>Pit latrine without slab or open pit </li></ul><ul><li>Bucket </li></ul><ul><li>Hanging toilet or hanging latrine </li></ul><ul><li>No facilities or bush or field </li></ul>
    8. 8. The Number of Disaster Victim by Type Source: CRED   EM-DAT http:// www.cred.be / Earthquake Flood Land Slide Others Draught Storm Eructation (Annual Average for 5 years ) Annual Average of disaster victim (million people) Water related Disaster
    9. 9. Water Conflict Map Colorad River Water Use and pollution between USA and Mexico Cenepa River Water resources ownership between Ecuadorand Peru Palana River Dam Construction and Environment between Argentina, Brazil, and Paraguay Zambia Water outage during civil cocnflict Donau River Water utilization in canals between Slovakia and Hungary Nile River Dam construction and water distribution between Egypt, Sudan, and Ethiopia Bosnia Water outage during conflict Water supply from Malaysia to Singapore Han River Dam construction and environment between North and South Korea Aral Sea Excess water use and unbalanced distribution in industries in Central Asia Tigris and Euphrates River Water resource development and distribution between Turkey, Syria and Iraq Jordan River Water source ownership and water distribution between Israel, Jordan, and Lebanon Ganges River Dam construction and operation between India and Bangradesh Indus River Water Rewources ownership between India and Pakistan By Secretariat of 3 rd World Water Forum “ If the wars of this century were fought over oil, the wars of the next century will be fought over water. “ By Dr. Ismail Serageldin, Former President of The World Bank and Former Chair of Global Water Partnership, 1995
    10. 10. Water Issues in Asia-Pacific <ul><li>Water Supply and Sanitation </li></ul><ul><ul><li>660 million people live without access to safe drinking water. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>1.9 billion people live without access to basic sanitation. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Water-related Disaster </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The region accounted for 80 % of the world’s total deaths due to water-related disasters (2001-2005). </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Water and Food </li></ul><ul><ul><li>80% of water used for agriculture in the region. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>60% of the world’s population lives in the region. </li></ul></ul>60 % 80 %
    11. 11. Characteristic of Water Issues <ul><li>Water is not just the issue of one particular sector , such as environment, agriculture, industry or the aid issue. </li></ul><ul><li>It is the fundamental issue related to the human security and social and economic development of the nations. </li></ul><ul><li>The strong leadership and commitment of the national leaders are essential. </li></ul>
    12. 12. The 1 st Asia-Pacific Water Summit - Water Security: Leadership and Commitment - <ul><li>Date: December 3rd and 4th, 2007 </li></ul><ul><li>Organizers: Asia-Pacific Water Forum & Steering Committee of the 1st Asia-Pacific Water Summit </li></ul><ul><li>Participants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Number of Delegations: 36 countries and regions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>*Heads of delegation: </li></ul><ul><li> 10 heads of States/Governments and 32 ministers </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Leaders from various sectors: 140 people (70 people from abroad) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>⇒ Total no. of participants : 371 from 56 countries & regions </li></ul>I am sure that productive discussions at the Asia-Pacific Water Summit will give strong momentum and provide excellent advice to the G8 Summit. By Mr. Yasuo Fukuda, Prime Minister of Japan The 1 st Asia-Pacific Water Summit is the first Summit in history dedicated to the resolution of water issues is to raise awareness of water issues and share a determination to take concrete actions towards the resolution of water issues.
    13. 13. Key Outcomes of APWS <ul><li>Message from Beppu </li></ul><ul><li>- Agreed by participants </li></ul><ul><li>Chair’s Summary </li></ul><ul><li>- Summary of discussions </li></ul>Japan Water Forum (JWF) Asia-Pacific Water Forum ( APWF ) Steering Committee Chair: Yoshiro Mori Governing Council Chair: Tommy Koh Vice Chair: Erna Witoelar Ravi Narayanan 1 st Asia-Pacific Water Summit <ul><li>APWF Secretariat </li></ul><ul><li>1 st Asia Pacific </li></ul><ul><li>Water Summit </li></ul><ul><li>Secretariat </li></ul>APWF Policy Brief - Key Messages & Policy Recommendations <ul><li>Message from Open Events (30) </li></ul><ul><li>Message from NGOs </li></ul>17 Concrete Initiatives
    14. 14. Actions after APWS: Towards G8 Hokkaido Toyako Summit
    15. 15. ・ At the turn of the century, international society set forth the Millennium Development Goals to fulfill its high ideals. This year marks the halfway point for achieving those goals, which are to be realized by 2015. From the perspective of &quot;human security,&quot; I intend to focus on health, water, and education at the G8 Summit . ・ As global warming progresses, water issues should also be discussed at the international level. Water-related disasters constitute a serious threat . Without a safe water supply, good health cannot be achieved, and without access to water, there can be no development . I intend to promote international cooperation for the effective management of water , a cycling resource. source : Website of Yasuo Fukuda Prime Minister of Japan and His Cabinet G8 Actions after APWS: Special Address by Prime Minister Fukuda On the Occasion of the Annual Meeting of the World Economic Forum in Davos (January 26, 2008)
    16. 16. <ul><li>[Summary] </li></ul><ul><li>Communicated CEOs' key messages on the role of Asia-Pacific's private sector in meeting the water challenge before a select audience of policy makers, civil society representatives and business colleagues </li></ul><ul><li>Showcased their companies' best business practices </li></ul><ul><li>Offered policy recommendations from the private sector to attending policy-makers </li></ul><ul><li>Called on other business leaders in the region to explore participation and commitment to the CEO Water Mandate </li></ul>CEO Panel on Water: A Mandate for Action Organized by UN Global Compact
    17. 17. The CEO Water Mandate - An initiative by business leaders in partnership with the international community - Preamble (excerpt) As leaders of business organizations we recognize that the private sector has an important stake in helping to address the water challenge faced by the world today. It is increasingly clear that lack of access to clean water and sanitation in many parts of the world causes great suffering in humanitarian, social, environmental and economic terms, and seriously undermines development goals. <ul><li>6 Founding endorsers of this initiative (The Coca-Cola Company, Levi Strauss & Co., Läckeby Water Group, Nestlé S.A., SABMiller) committed there actions to be implemented towards resolution of water issuers. At present, 30 CEOs signed this initiative. </li></ul><ul><li>This initiative is open to companies of all sizes and from all sectors, and from all parts of world. </li></ul><ul><li>6 Key Areas are Direct Operations; Supply Chain and Watershed Management; Collective Action; Public Policy; Community Engagement; and Transparency . </li></ul><ul><li>20 endorsers of the CEO Water Mandate issued the letter to urge G8 Governments to taka action towards the resolution of water issues. </li></ul>
    18. 18. 6 Key Areas; Direct Operations <ul><li>Virtually all business organizations, whether small or large, utilize water in the production of their goods and services . The extent of this use varies across industrial and economic sectors. For instance, water-infrastructure companies play a direct role in working with governments and municipalities to manage water and wastewater systems. In other cases, water is a primary ingredient in an organization’s final product. Water is also crucial in the manufacturing or development process of many companies. In still others, water is a primary resource in the supply chain . </li></ul><ul><li>In areas of water stress, rapid industrialization and economic development place significant demands on water resources. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, we pledge to undertake the following actions, where appropriate, over time: </li></ul><ul><li>Conduct a comprehensive water-use assessment to understand the extent to which the company uses water in the direct production of goods and services. </li></ul><ul><li>Set targets for our operations related to water conservation and waste-water treatment , framed in a corporate cleaner production and consumption strategy . </li></ul><ul><li>Seek to invest in and use new technologies to achieve these goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Raise awareness of water sustainability within corporate culture. </li></ul><ul><li>Include water sustainability considerations in business decision-making – e.g., facility-siting, due diligence, and production processes. </li></ul>
    19. 19. Japan Water Forum in Business <ul><li>JWF will bridge all the stakeholders on water through; </li></ul><ul><li>Create Water Platform </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Involve all the stakeholders </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Share and disseminate the information </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Organize regional water business forum </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Arrange business dialogues (Business to Business, Government, Civil Society etc) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Make policy recommendations to government and civil society from the view point of business activities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Collaborate with CSR activities by business sectors </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Joint Activities (ex. Water-related project) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Educational activities on Water and Environment </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Management of Fund and Donation for grass-root activities </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Increase of importance of water as resources </li></ul><ul><li>Expansion of collaboration beyond countries, sectors, type of organizations in water business </li></ul><ul><li>Increase of importance of CSR activities in business sector </li></ul>External Environment <ul><li>Wide ranging networking (National & Local Gov, UN Orgs, International & Regional Orgs, Academia, Civil Society, Business Sector, Youth, etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Expertise of water related issues (technology, policy recommendation, administration etc.) </li></ul><ul><li>Neutral position (non-government, non-partisan, non-profit) </li></ul>Strength of JWF
    20. 20. Thank you for your kind attention! <ul><li>[Contact] </li></ul><ul><li>Shuichi Hirayama (Mr.) </li></ul><ul><li>Director for Regional Coordination, Japan Water Forum </li></ul><ul><li>5th Floor,1-8-1 Kojimachi Chiyoda-ku,Tokyo 102-0083 Tel +81 (0)3 5212 1645 </li></ul><ul><li>Fax +81 (0)3 5212 1649 </li></ul><ul><li>E-mail: [email_address] </li></ul><ul><li>Website: www.waterforum.jp </li></ul>
    21. 21. Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) <ul><li>What is MDGs; </li></ul><ul><li>The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) are eight goals that 189 United Nations member states have agreed to try to achieve by the year 2015. MDGs derive from earlier 'international development goals'[1], and were officially established at the Millennium Summit in 2000, where 189 world leaders adopted the United Nations Millennium Declaration, from which the eight-goal action plan, the 'Millennium Development Goals', was particularly promoted. MDGs were developed out of the eight chapters of the United Nations Millennium Declaration, signed in September 2000. The eight goals and 21 targets include </li></ul><ul><li>Eradicate extreme poverty and hunger ; Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people whose income is less than one dollar a day, Achieve full and productive employment and decent work for all, including women and young people, Halve, between 1990 and 2015, the proportion of people who suffer from hunger </li></ul><ul><li>Achieve universal primary education; Ensure that, by 2015, children everywhere, boys and girls alike, will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling. </li></ul><ul><li>Promote gender equality and empower women; Eliminate gender disparity in primary and secondary education preferably by 2005, and at all levels by 2015. </li></ul><ul><li>Reduce child mortality; Reduce by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate. </li></ul><ul><li>Improve maternal health; Reduce by three quarters, between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio. Achieve, by 2015, universal access to reproductive health </li></ul><ul><li>Combat HIV/AIDS, malaria, and other diseases; Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the spread of HIV/AIDS. Achieve, by 2010, universal access to treatment for HIV/AIDS for all those who need it. Have halted by 2015 and begun to reverse the incidence of malaria and other major diseases. </li></ul><ul><li>Ensure environmental sustainability; Integrate the principles of sustainable development into country policies and programmes; reverse loss of environmental resources. Reduce biodiversity loss, achieving, by 2010, a significant reduction in the rate of loss Halve, by 2015, the proportion of people without sustainable access to safe drinking water and basic sanitation (for more information see the entry on water supply). By 2020, to have achieved a significant improvement in the lives of at least 100 million slum-dwellers </li></ul><ul><li>Develop a global partnership for development; Develop further an open trading and financial system that is rule-based, predictable and non-discriminatory. Includes a commitment to good governance, development and poverty reduction—nationally and internationally. Address the special needs of the least developed countries. This includes tariff and quota free access for their exports; enhanced programme of debt relief for heavily indebted poor countries; and cancellation of official bilateral debt; and more generous official development assistance for countries committed to poverty reduction. Address the special needs of landlocked and small island developing States. Deal comprehensively with the debt problems of developing countries through national and international measures in order to make debt sustainable in the long term. In cooperation with pharmaceutical companies, provide access to affordable essential drugs in developing countries. In cooperation with the private sector, make available the benefits of new technologies, especially information and communications </li></ul>
    22. 22. Asia-Pacific Water Forum A network of water stakeholders from the Asia-Pacific region for the resolution of water issues in the region and worldwide Weblog Discussion http://www.apwf2.org/
    23. 24. (alphabetic order)
    24. 25. Foreword We, the leaders of the Asia-Pacific, coming from all sectors of our societies and countries, meeting at the historic inaugural Asia Pacific Water Summit, in the beautiful city of Beppu, in the hospitable Oita Prefecture of Japan, do hereby agree to: ・ Recognise the people’s right to safe drinking water and basic sanitation as a basic human right and a fundamental aspect of human security ; ・ Reduce by half the number of people who do not have access to safe drinking water by 2015 and aim to reduce that number to zero by 2025; ・ Reduce by half number of people who do not have access to basic sanitation in our region by 2015 and aim to reduce that number to zero by 2025, through the adoption of new and innovative sanitation systems that are not as water reliant as current methods; ・ Accord the highest priority to water and sanitation in our economic and development plans and agendas and to increase substantially our allocation of resources to the water and sanitation sector s. ・ Improve governance, efficiency, transparency and equity in all aspects related to the management of water, particularly as it impacts on poor communities. Key Outcomes of APWS - Message from Beppu -
    25. 26. <ul><li>・ We recognise that while women are particularly vulnerable, they are also resilient and ent r eprene u r i al, hence, should be empowered in all water-related activities. </li></ul><ul><li>・ Take urgent and effective action to prevent and reduce the risks of flood , drought and other water-related disasters and to bring timely relief and assistance to their victims; </li></ul><ul><li>・ Support the region’s vulnerable small island states in their efforts to protect lives and livelihoods from the impacts of climate change; </li></ul><ul><li>・ Exhort the Bali Conference to take into account the relationship between water and climate change, such as the melting of snowcaps and glaciers in the Himalayas and rising sea levels, which are already having an impact on some countries in the region; </li></ul><ul><li>・ Establish concrete goals for the 2008 Toyako G8 Summit to: </li></ul><ul><ul><li>  - commit to support the developing countries to achieve their MDG targets on </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>water and sanitation; and </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>  - take immediate action to support adaptation to climate change by </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>developing countries; </li></ul></ul>Key Outcomes of APWS - Message from Beppu -
    26. 27. ・ Empower a high-level coordinating mechanism in our cabinets and where possible, appoint a minister in charge of water to ensure that all issues related to water and sanitation would be dealt with in a holistic manner ; ・ Respect and strengthen the region’s rich history of water-centered community development, including the rehabilitation of urban waterways and protecting the environmental integrity of rural watersheds; ・ Work together with other like-minded institutions, entities and individuals in order to achieve our collective vision of water security in the Asia Pacific region . We will support the Policy Brief as prepared by the Asia Pacific Water Forum family. We encourage all governments to make all efforts to implement its recommendations . We have the will and courage to realise our vision. Key Outcomes of APWS - Message from Beppu -
    27. 28. Preamble; The CEO Water Mandate <ul><li>As leaders of business organizations we recognize that the private sector has an important stake in helping to address the water challenge faced by the world today. It is increasingly clear that lack of access to clean water and sanitation in many parts of the world causes great suffering in humanitarian, social, environmental and economic terms, and seriously undermines development goals. We also recognize the following: </li></ul><ul><li>Water stress is expected to worsen in many parts of the world as a result of factors including urbanization and population growth, increasing food production, changing consumption patterns, industrialization, water pollution, and climate change. The main user of fresh water is agriculture. Though much less is used in manufacturing and services, these sectors can still contribute positively. </li></ul><ul><li>Scarcity and related problems pose material risks but can also, when well managed, create opportunities for improvement and innovation. </li></ul><ul><li>Unsafe drinking water and lack of appropriate sanitation profoundly affect the health and well-being of billions of people, including those who are our customers and employees. </li></ul><ul><li>Companies can have a direct impact on water management in their own business, as well as an indirect impact by encouraging and facilitating actions by those in their supply chains to improve water management. </li></ul><ul><li>In order to operate in a sustainable manner, and contribute to the vision of the UN Global Compact and the realization of the Millennium Development Goals, companies have a responsibility to make water-resources management a priority . </li></ul><ul><li>Individual and collective efforts – involving partnership with the public sector and civil society and through the supply chain – will be required to adequately address this crisis. </li></ul><ul><li>Recognizing these facts, and the positive role that the international business community can play, we hereby present this “CEO Water Mandate” and invite other business leaders to endorse its vision and objectives, and to adopt its strategic framework. The CEO Water Mandate is voluntary and aspirational. Nonetheless it represents a commitment to action. Its structure covers six key areas and is designed to assist companies in developing a comprehensive approach to water management. The six areas are: Direct Operations; Supply Chain and Watershed Management; Collective Action; Public Policy; Community Engagement; and Transparency . Water and sanitation management are vital in both developing and developed economies. Certain areas of the world are experiencing, or are expected to experience, acute water stress. These areas are identified and discussed in the Global Environment Outlook Report and Global International Waters Assessment, published by the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP), and the Human Development Report 2006, published by the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP). </li></ul>
    28. 29. 6 Key Areas; Supply Chain and Watershed Management <ul><li>In recent years more and more business organizations have focused on issues and activities along their supply chains – recognizing that many impacts are beyond their direct control. With respect to water, this understanding is quite new, with many companies just beginning to examine the degree to which their suppliers utilize water in their operations. </li></ul><ul><li>The role of agriculture is particularly important as it accounts for 70 percent of all fresh water withdrawn, and must play a primary role in helping to address improved water management. </li></ul><ul><li>At the same time, companies operating in communities and areas of water stress increasingly see that as local stakeholders they have an interest and can play a role in helping to protect and manage the area watershed – understanding and recognizing the leading role that governments and local authorities must play. Therefore, we pledge to undertake the following actions, where appropriate, over time: </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage suppliers to improve their water conservation, quality monitoring,waste-water treatment, and recycling practices. </li></ul><ul><li>Build capacities to analyze and respond to watershed risk. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage and facilitate suppliers in conducting assessments of water usage and impacts. </li></ul><ul><li>Share water sustainability practices – established and emerging – with suppliers. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage major suppliers to report regularly on progress achieved related to goals. </li></ul>
    29. 30. 6 Key Areas; Collective Action <ul><li>While individual organizational efforts will be critical in helping to address the water challenge, collective efforts – across sectors and societal spheres – will also be required. Such multi-stakeholder collaboration can draw on significant expertise, capacities and resources. Utilizing frameworks such as the UN Global Compact, companies can participate in collective efforts to address water sustainability. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, we pledge to undertake the following actions, where appropriate, over time: </li></ul><ul><li>Build closer ties with civil society organizations , especially at the regional and local levels. </li></ul><ul><li>Work with national, regional and local governments and public authorities to address water sustainability issues and policies, as well as with relevant international institutions – e.g., the UNEP Global Programme of Action. </li></ul><ul><li>Encourage development and use of new technologies , including efficient irrigation methods, new plant varieties, drought resistance, water efficiency and salt tolerance. </li></ul><ul><li>Be actively involved in the UN Global Compact’s Country Networks . </li></ul><ul><li>Support the work of existing water initiatives involving the private sector – e.g., the Global Water Challenge; UNICEF’s Water, Environment and Sanitation Program; IFRC Water and Sanitation Program; the World Economic Forum Water Initiative – and collaborate with other relevant UN bodies and intergovernmental organizations – e.g., the World Health Organization, the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development, and the World Bank Group. </li></ul>
    30. 31. 6 Key Areas; Public Policy <ul><li>Actions such as those proposed in this Mandate will only be sustainable and efficient if embedded in effective global, regional and local water governance structures with the right incentives for water efficiency and allocation. As a consequence, the topic of water sustainability is increasingly rising to the top of the international policy agenda as governments, multilateral organizations and other stakeholders, including civil society, debate the challenge. </li></ul><ul><li>Some of these discussions relate to government policy and regulation; others focus on the interplay of regulatory and voluntary efforts; while still others involve efforts to create the proper environment and enabling spaces for partnerships and collective efforts to flourish. Basic issues of water governance and the market value of water remain to be resolved and are fundamental to making progress in water management. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, we pledge to undertake the following actions, where appropriate, over time: </li></ul><ul><li>Contribute inputs and recommendations in the formulation of government regulation and in the creation of market mechanisms in ways that drive the water sustainability agenda. </li></ul><ul><li>Exercise “business statesmanship” by being advocates for water sustainability in global and local policy discussions, clearly presenting the role and responsibility of the private sector in supporting integrated water resource management. </li></ul><ul><li>Partner with governments, businesses, civil society and other stakeholders – for example specialized institutes such as the Stockholm International Water Institute, UNEP Collaborating Centre on Water and Environment, and UNESCO’s Institute for Water Education – to advance the body of knowledge, intelligence and tools. </li></ul><ul><li>Join and/or support special policy-oriented bodies and associated frameworks – e.g., UNEP’s Water Policy and Strategy; UNDP’s Water Governance Programme. </li></ul>
    31. 32. 6 Key Areas; Community Engagement <ul><li>Companies operate not in a vacuum but in a broader societal context. Indeed, it is increasingly recognized that businesses are part of the social fabric of the communities in which they operate – and as corporate citizens share in the responsibility of the sustainability and wellbeing of these communities. More and more companies – both multinationals operating abroad and local enterprise – see tha supporting or actively engaging with communities and grass-roots organizations and initiatives is in their enlightened self-interest. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, we pledge to undertake the following actions, where appropriate, over time: </li></ul><ul><li>Endeavor to understand the water and sanitation challenges in the communities where we operate and how our businesses impact those challenges. </li></ul><ul><li>Be active members of the local community , and encourage or provide support to local government, groups and initiatives seeking to advance the water and sanitation agendas. </li></ul><ul><li>Undertake water-resource education and awareness campaigns in partnership with local stakeholders. </li></ul><ul><li>Work with public authorities and their agents to support – when appropriate – the development of adequate water infrastructure, including water and sanitation delivery systems. </li></ul>
    32. 33. 6 Key Areas; Transparency <ul><li>Transparency goes to the heart of accountability. Leading companies recognize that transparency and disclosure are crucial in terms of meeting the expectations of a wide group of stakeholders. Such efforts help companies focus on continuous improvement and turning principles into results – a process which is crucial in terms of realizing gains and building trust. </li></ul><ul><li>Therefore, we pledge to undertake the following actions, where appropriate, over time: </li></ul><ul><li>Include a description of actions and investments undertaken in relation to The CEO Water Mandate in our annual Communications on Progress for the UN Global Compact, making reference to relevant performance indicators such as the water indicators found in the Global Reporting Initiative (GRI) Guidelines . </li></ul><ul><li>Publish and share our water strategies (including targets and results as well as areas for improvement) in relevant corporate reports, using – where appropriate – the water indicators found in the GRI Guidelines . </li></ul><ul><li>Be transparent in dealings and conversations with governments and other public authorities on water issues . </li></ul>

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