2 12 09 Coevolution

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2 12 09 Coevolution

  1. 1. Co-evolution
  2. 2. Co-evolution <ul><li>Def – interactions among species that result in reciprocal adaptation. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Two species evolve in response to long-term interactions with each other. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Escalation – Predators evolve better equipped to catch prey items </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Pray evolve adaptations to help get away from predators </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Like during the “cold war” US and Soviet Union </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Acacia eaters – if you are a plant how might you defend yourself? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  3. 3. <ul><li>Animals that cannot eat acacia trees and bushes – wildebeests, hippos, rhino, zebra, buffalo, birds, squirrels, turtles, mice, rats </li></ul>
  4. 4. <ul><li>Orchid have developed a spur. The spur holds nectar. </li></ul><ul><ul><li>The nectar is a reward for animal and insect visitors. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Why would the plant reward the visitors? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><li>This particular bee can get the nectar only by buzzing. </li></ul><ul><li>Some bugs have a tongue to get the nectar. </li></ul>
  5. 7. <ul><li>Orchid and moth – a particular orchid in Madagascar has a spur 40 cm long </li></ul><ul><ul><li>At the end of the spur it stores it’s nectar </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Knowing what you know now about coevolution what prediction can you make about a moth that might feed on the nectar? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Show Pirjin’s hawk moth </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>What benefit would there be to having a spur that long? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Darwin predicted there should be a moth with a “tongue” long enough to get the nectar. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>50 years later a moth was discovered that fit the prediction. </li></ul></ul></ul>
  6. 8. Slid the moth over and you will see the tongue fits perfectly How could this evolve like this?
  7. 9. <ul><li>Other place we can see co-evolution </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Pronghorns </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Can run up to 60 mph for short distances and 45 mph or miles and miles. </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Why would the prong horn be able to run that fast? </li></ul></ul></ul>
  8. 10. <ul><ul><ul><li>10,000 years ago there were cheetahs and long legged hyenas </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>http://query.nytimes.com/gst/fullpage.html?res=9502E0D71031F937A15751C1A960958260&sec=&spon=&pagewanted=all </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Hummingbirds </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>1 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>2 </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Plant poisons </li></ul></ul>
  9. 11. <ul><li>Bacteria </li></ul><ul><ul><li>antibiotic resistance. when you don’t finish your medicine what happens? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>if you don’t finish, some of the bacteria remain. The ones that remain have a little resistance. </li></ul></ul>

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