Terenia Autrey Paris Campbell Barbara Gaskins Jay Henry Jess Hernanadez Kristen Jerkins John Mielke     STRATEGIC FORCE   ...
(Jason Morgan, 2010)
Team Development StagesForming   Members get to know each other.Storming   Strengths and weaknesses are defined.Norming   ...
Team Development Stages
Team Development StagesAdjourning  Team dismantles and takes with them a  common knowledge.Transforming  The team continue...
(Robert Fisher, 1981)
Team NegotiationWhat is Negotiation?   When two or more people strive to reach an   agreement on a certain matter.Principl...
Team Negotiation Tips(Ed Brodow, 2011)
Team Negotiation TipsTeam Negotiation Tips     State your opinions     Listen     Do your homework     Don’t be in a hurry...
(Carole Townsley, 2010)
Conflict ResolutionSteps to resolving conflict      Prepare for resolution      Understand the situation      Reach agreeme...
Conflict Resolution(Cynthia Clay, 2007)
Conflict ResolutionWhat not to do      Ignore it      Quash it      Tell them to work it out      Take sides  (Cynthia Clay...
Face-To-Face vs.   Virtual Team ChallengesFace-To-Face Teams   Communication is more personable.Virtual Teams   Communicat...
Face-To-Face Teams
Face-To-Face TeamsProsStronger relational linksGreater trust buildingCan result in higher performanceVisual cues and gestu...
Virtual Teams
Virtual TeamsProsNo need to change scheduleNo travel requiredEasier to establish more focused discussionsConsHarder to bui...
(Tom Vaughton, 2011)
Motivating a TeamMotivating a Team    Talk TO them, not AT them    Be generous    Avoid micromanagement    Pick team playe...
The Power of Teamwork
The Power of Teamwork
Resources    Brodow, E. (2011) Ten tips for negotiation in 2011.        Retrieved September 14th, 2011 from        http://...
Resources    Vaughton, T. (2011) Five techniques for motivating a team.    Retrieved September 16th, 2011 from    http://m...
MLR Team2 sec.17 Team project
MLR Team2 sec.17 Team project
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  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • Welcome, everyone, to our team presentation. Our team members are Terenia Autrey, Paris Campbell, Barbara Gaskins, Joevannie Henry, Jessica Hernandez, Kristen Jerkins, and John Mielke. Together, we are the Strategic Force.\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The first step of team development is always forming. During this stage, members will get to know each other so that they may effectively communicate throughout the course of the team project. Team members will find out each other’s strengths and weaknesses so that they can define their primary roles within the team.\n\nThe second step is storming. During this stage of development, the team members will address any questions or concerns. This step could also involve debates and disagreements. It’s not always a fun stage to go through, but it’s vital that the team members go into this stage with an open mind.\n\nThe third step should be norming. This is where each team member brings together his or her resources to contribute to the team’s final goal. At this stage, you should start to see the project take shape.\n\nThe last and most important step is performing. Each team member’s performance will depend on how well he or she has performed the previous steps. Team communication, knowledge, and efficiency will ultimately define your team’s final performance to work towards a common goal.\n\nResource:\n(Jason Morgan, 2010)\n\n
  • The last two steps are adjourning and transforming.\n\nAdjourning is when a team finishes a project and goes their separate ways, often taking with them the knowledge and relationships that they’ve gained while working with their team.\n\nOften forgotten, is transforming. This step happens when a team stays together and goes through certain changes. A new project or a new team member could be some challenges that they may have to face. In this case, the team should take their knowledge and continue to grow as a team.\n\nBelow is a diagram of the team development stages.\n\n
  • The last two steps are adjourning and transforming.\n\nAdjourning is when a team finishes a project and goes their separate ways, often taking with them the knowledge and relationships that they’ve gained while working with their team.\n\nOften forgotten, is transforming. This step happens when a team stays together and goes through certain changes. A new project or a new team member could be some challenges that they may have to face. In this case, the team should take their knowledge and continue to grow as a team.\n\nBelow is a diagram of the team development stages.\n\n
  • The last two steps are adjourning and transforming.\n\nAdjourning is when a team finishes a project and goes their separate ways, often taking with them the knowledge and relationships that they’ve gained while working with their team.\n\nOften forgotten, is transforming. This step happens when a team stays together and goes through certain changes. A new project or a new team member could be some challenges that they may have to face. In this case, the team should take their knowledge and continue to grow as a team.\n\nBelow is a diagram of the team development stages.\n\n
  • The last two steps are adjourning and transforming.\n\nAdjourning is when a team finishes a project and goes their separate ways, often taking with them the knowledge and relationships that they’ve gained while working with their team.\n\nOften forgotten, is transforming. This step happens when a team stays together and goes through certain changes. A new project or a new team member could be some challenges that they may have to face. In this case, the team should take their knowledge and continue to grow as a team.\n\nBelow is a diagram of the team development stages.\n\n
  • The last two steps are adjourning and transforming.\n\nAdjourning is when a team finishes a project and goes their separate ways, often taking with them the knowledge and relationships that they’ve gained while working with their team.\n\nOften forgotten, is transforming. This step happens when a team stays together and goes through certain changes. A new project or a new team member could be some challenges that they may have to face. In this case, the team should take their knowledge and continue to grow as a team.\n\nBelow is a diagram of the team development stages.\n\n
  • The last two steps are adjourning and transforming.\n\nAdjourning is when a team finishes a project and goes their separate ways, often taking with them the knowledge and relationships that they’ve gained while working with their team.\n\nOften forgotten, is transforming. This step happens when a team stays together and goes through certain changes. A new project or a new team member could be some challenges that they may have to face. In this case, the team should take their knowledge and continue to grow as a team.\n\nBelow is a diagram of the team development stages.\n\n
  • Team negotiation is one of the fundamental skills for a successful team to have. Negotiation is defined when a group of two or more strives to reach an agreement on a certain matter. Usually, this can make or break a team.\n\nThe first step of the principled negotiation process is to separate the people from the problem. It’s not a good idea to get relationship issues mixed into your team negotiations.\n\nThe second step is to focus on interests, not positions. Remember to focus on the task at hand. By doing this, disputing parties are able focus on making the right decisions for the team instead of one position.\n\nThe third step should be to generate several options before deciding on what to do. This could simplify the negotiation process, since it’s easier to choose the right option if you have many to choose from.\n\n
  • Team negotiation is one of the fundamental skills for a successful team to have. Negotiation is defined when a group of two or more strives to reach an agreement on a certain matter. Usually, this can make or break a team.\n\nThe first step of the principled negotiation process is to separate the people from the problem. It’s not a good idea to get relationship issues mixed into your team negotiations.\n\nThe second step is to focus on interests, not positions. Remember to focus on the task at hand. By doing this, disputing parties are able focus on making the right decisions for the team instead of one position.\n\nThe third step should be to generate several options before deciding on what to do. This could simplify the negotiation process, since it’s easier to choose the right option if you have many to choose from.\n\n
  • Team negotiation is one of the fundamental skills for a successful team to have. Negotiation is defined when a group of two or more strives to reach an agreement on a certain matter. Usually, this can make or break a team.\n\nThe first step of the principled negotiation process is to separate the people from the problem. It’s not a good idea to get relationship issues mixed into your team negotiations.\n\nThe second step is to focus on interests, not positions. Remember to focus on the task at hand. By doing this, disputing parties are able focus on making the right decisions for the team instead of one position.\n\nThe third step should be to generate several options before deciding on what to do. This could simplify the negotiation process, since it’s easier to choose the right option if you have many to choose from.\n\n
  • Team negotiation is one of the fundamental skills for a successful team to have. Negotiation is defined when a group of two or more strives to reach an agreement on a certain matter. Usually, this can make or break a team.\n\nThe first step of the principled negotiation process is to separate the people from the problem. It’s not a good idea to get relationship issues mixed into your team negotiations.\n\nThe second step is to focus on interests, not positions. Remember to focus on the task at hand. By doing this, disputing parties are able focus on making the right decisions for the team instead of one position.\n\nThe third step should be to generate several options before deciding on what to do. This could simplify the negotiation process, since it’s easier to choose the right option if you have many to choose from.\n\n
  • Team negotiation is one of the fundamental skills for a successful team to have. Negotiation is defined when a group of two or more strives to reach an agreement on a certain matter. Usually, this can make or break a team.\n\nThe first step of the principled negotiation process is to separate the people from the problem. It’s not a good idea to get relationship issues mixed into your team negotiations.\n\nThe second step is to focus on interests, not positions. Remember to focus on the task at hand. By doing this, disputing parties are able focus on making the right decisions for the team instead of one position.\n\nThe third step should be to generate several options before deciding on what to do. This could simplify the negotiation process, since it’s easier to choose the right option if you have many to choose from.\n\n
  • Team negotiation is one of the fundamental skills for a successful team to have. Negotiation is defined when a group of two or more strives to reach an agreement on a certain matter. Usually, this can make or break a team.\n\nThe first step of the principled negotiation process is to separate the people from the problem. It’s not a good idea to get relationship issues mixed into your team negotiations.\n\nThe second step is to focus on interests, not positions. Remember to focus on the task at hand. By doing this, disputing parties are able focus on making the right decisions for the team instead of one position.\n\nThe third step should be to generate several options before deciding on what to do. This could simplify the negotiation process, since it’s easier to choose the right option if you have many to choose from.\n\n
  • Team negotiation is one of the fundamental skills for a successful team to have. Negotiation is defined when a group of two or more strives to reach an agreement on a certain matter. Usually, this can make or break a team.\n\nThe first step of the principled negotiation process is to separate the people from the problem. It’s not a good idea to get relationship issues mixed into your team negotiations.\n\nThe second step is to focus on interests, not positions. Remember to focus on the task at hand. By doing this, disputing parties are able focus on making the right decisions for the team instead of one position.\n\nThe third step should be to generate several options before deciding on what to do. This could simplify the negotiation process, since it’s easier to choose the right option if you have many to choose from.\n\n
  • Here we have a few tips that could be helpful for any team negotiations.\n\nFirst off, you shouldn’t be afraid to state your opinions. Your team wants to hear your input and it’s really important that you all share your ideas and concerns to reach a goal. A successful negotiator also listens to everyone’s opinion. By doing this, it will help you keep your mind open to other possibilities.\n\nDo your homework. A negotiation will usually end up badly if you don’t know what you’re talking about. In order to reach a common goal, you must research and gain knowledge on the subject.\n\nDon’t be in a hurry. Take your time to think about each option and the possible outcomes. Your team will be successful in negotiation if you’re all patient.\n\nLastly, don’t take it personally. Each team member is apart of the team for a reason. There will be many ideas floating around, which will often lead to agreements or disagreements. Everyone has an opinion… but just remember you’re all there to work together as a team!\n\n
  • Here we have a few tips that could be helpful for any team negotiations.\n\nFirst off, you shouldn’t be afraid to state your opinions. Your team wants to hear your input and it’s really important that you all share your ideas and concerns to reach a goal. A successful negotiator also listens to everyone’s opinion. By doing this, it will help you keep your mind open to other possibilities.\n\nDo your homework. A negotiation will usually end up badly if you don’t know what you’re talking about. In order to reach a common goal, you must research and gain knowledge on the subject.\n\nDon’t be in a hurry. Take your time to think about each option and the possible outcomes. Your team will be successful in negotiation if you’re all patient.\n\nLastly, don’t take it personally. Each team member is apart of the team for a reason. There will be many ideas floating around, which will often lead to agreements or disagreements. Everyone has an opinion… but just remember you’re all there to work together as a team!\n\n
  • Here we have a few tips that could be helpful for any team negotiations.\n\nFirst off, you shouldn’t be afraid to state your opinions. Your team wants to hear your input and it’s really important that you all share your ideas and concerns to reach a goal. A successful negotiator also listens to everyone’s opinion. By doing this, it will help you keep your mind open to other possibilities.\n\nDo your homework. A negotiation will usually end up badly if you don’t know what you’re talking about. In order to reach a common goal, you must research and gain knowledge on the subject.\n\nDon’t be in a hurry. Take your time to think about each option and the possible outcomes. Your team will be successful in negotiation if you’re all patient.\n\nLastly, don’t take it personally. Each team member is apart of the team for a reason. There will be many ideas floating around, which will often lead to agreements or disagreements. Everyone has an opinion… but just remember you’re all there to work together as a team!\n\n
  • Here we have a few tips that could be helpful for any team negotiations.\n\nFirst off, you shouldn’t be afraid to state your opinions. Your team wants to hear your input and it’s really important that you all share your ideas and concerns to reach a goal. A successful negotiator also listens to everyone’s opinion. By doing this, it will help you keep your mind open to other possibilities.\n\nDo your homework. A negotiation will usually end up badly if you don’t know what you’re talking about. In order to reach a common goal, you must research and gain knowledge on the subject.\n\nDon’t be in a hurry. Take your time to think about each option and the possible outcomes. Your team will be successful in negotiation if you’re all patient.\n\nLastly, don’t take it personally. Each team member is apart of the team for a reason. There will be many ideas floating around, which will often lead to agreements or disagreements. Everyone has an opinion… but just remember you’re all there to work together as a team!\n\n
  • Here we have a few tips that could be helpful for any team negotiations.\n\nFirst off, you shouldn’t be afraid to state your opinions. Your team wants to hear your input and it’s really important that you all share your ideas and concerns to reach a goal. A successful negotiator also listens to everyone’s opinion. By doing this, it will help you keep your mind open to other possibilities.\n\nDo your homework. A negotiation will usually end up badly if you don’t know what you’re talking about. In order to reach a common goal, you must research and gain knowledge on the subject.\n\nDon’t be in a hurry. Take your time to think about each option and the possible outcomes. Your team will be successful in negotiation if you’re all patient.\n\nLastly, don’t take it personally. Each team member is apart of the team for a reason. There will be many ideas floating around, which will often lead to agreements or disagreements. Everyone has an opinion… but just remember you’re all there to work together as a team!\n\n
  • Here we have a few tips that could be helpful for any team negotiations.\n\nFirst off, you shouldn’t be afraid to state your opinions. Your team wants to hear your input and it’s really important that you all share your ideas and concerns to reach a goal. A successful negotiator also listens to everyone’s opinion. By doing this, it will help you keep your mind open to other possibilities.\n\nDo your homework. A negotiation will usually end up badly if you don’t know what you’re talking about. In order to reach a common goal, you must research and gain knowledge on the subject.\n\nDon’t be in a hurry. Take your time to think about each option and the possible outcomes. Your team will be successful in negotiation if you’re all patient.\n\nLastly, don’t take it personally. Each team member is apart of the team for a reason. There will be many ideas floating around, which will often lead to agreements or disagreements. Everyone has an opinion… but just remember you’re all there to work together as a team!\n\n
  • Here we have a few tips that could be helpful for any team negotiations.\n\nFirst off, you shouldn’t be afraid to state your opinions. Your team wants to hear your input and it’s really important that you all share your ideas and concerns to reach a goal. A successful negotiator also listens to everyone’s opinion. By doing this, it will help you keep your mind open to other possibilities.\n\nDo your homework. A negotiation will usually end up badly if you don’t know what you’re talking about. In order to reach a common goal, you must research and gain knowledge on the subject.\n\nDon’t be in a hurry. Take your time to think about each option and the possible outcomes. Your team will be successful in negotiation if you’re all patient.\n\nLastly, don’t take it personally. Each team member is apart of the team for a reason. There will be many ideas floating around, which will often lead to agreements or disagreements. Everyone has an opinion… but just remember you’re all there to work together as a team!\n\n
  • Here we have a few tips that could be helpful for any team negotiations.\n\nFirst off, you shouldn’t be afraid to state your opinions. Your team wants to hear your input and it’s really important that you all share your ideas and concerns to reach a goal. A successful negotiator also listens to everyone’s opinion. By doing this, it will help you keep your mind open to other possibilities.\n\nDo your homework. A negotiation will usually end up badly if you don’t know what you’re talking about. In order to reach a common goal, you must research and gain knowledge on the subject.\n\nDon’t be in a hurry. Take your time to think about each option and the possible outcomes. Your team will be successful in negotiation if you’re all patient.\n\nLastly, don’t take it personally. Each team member is apart of the team for a reason. There will be many ideas floating around, which will often lead to agreements or disagreements. Everyone has an opinion… but just remember you’re all there to work together as a team!\n\n
  • Conflict is hard to avoid in a team of people that are working closely together. In order to overcome these conflicts, you must first prepare for a resolution. Acknowledge the conflict, discuss it with the team and agree to communicate to reach an agreement.\n\nYou also need to understand the situation. Clarifying positions can go a long way to resolve the conflict, but it’s most important for each team member to analyze and understand the situation to resolve it.\n\nLastly, if you prepare for a resolution and understand the situation, you will ultimately reach an agreement with your group.\n\n
  • Conflict is hard to avoid in a team of people that are working closely together. In order to overcome these conflicts, you must first prepare for a resolution. Acknowledge the conflict, discuss it with the team and agree to communicate to reach an agreement.\n\nYou also need to understand the situation. Clarifying positions can go a long way to resolve the conflict, but it’s most important for each team member to analyze and understand the situation to resolve it.\n\nLastly, if you prepare for a resolution and understand the situation, you will ultimately reach an agreement with your group.\n\n
  • Conflict is hard to avoid in a team of people that are working closely together. In order to overcome these conflicts, you must first prepare for a resolution. Acknowledge the conflict, discuss it with the team and agree to communicate to reach an agreement.\n\nYou also need to understand the situation. Clarifying positions can go a long way to resolve the conflict, but it’s most important for each team member to analyze and understand the situation to resolve it.\n\nLastly, if you prepare for a resolution and understand the situation, you will ultimately reach an agreement with your group.\n\n
  • Conflict is hard to avoid in a team of people that are working closely together. In order to overcome these conflicts, you must first prepare for a resolution. Acknowledge the conflict, discuss it with the team and agree to communicate to reach an agreement.\n\nYou also need to understand the situation. Clarifying positions can go a long way to resolve the conflict, but it’s most important for each team member to analyze and understand the situation to resolve it.\n\nLastly, if you prepare for a resolution and understand the situation, you will ultimately reach an agreement with your group.\n\n
  • Conflict is hard to avoid in a team of people that are working closely together. In order to overcome these conflicts, you must first prepare for a resolution. Acknowledge the conflict, discuss it with the team and agree to communicate to reach an agreement.\n\nYou also need to understand the situation. Clarifying positions can go a long way to resolve the conflict, but it’s most important for each team member to analyze and understand the situation to resolve it.\n\nLastly, if you prepare for a resolution and understand the situation, you will ultimately reach an agreement with your group.\n\n
  • Conflict is hard to avoid in a team of people that are working closely together. In order to overcome these conflicts, you must first prepare for a resolution. Acknowledge the conflict, discuss it with the team and agree to communicate to reach an agreement.\n\nYou also need to understand the situation. Clarifying positions can go a long way to resolve the conflict, but it’s most important for each team member to analyze and understand the situation to resolve it.\n\nLastly, if you prepare for a resolution and understand the situation, you will ultimately reach an agreement with your group.\n\n
  • When resolving a conflict in a group, these are a few things you do NOT want to do.\n\nNever ignore the situation. You may think it’s fine to just let things work themselves out, but they usually won’t.\n\nDo not quash it! Demanding that your team members grow up and get over it will surely make situations worse… not only for the situation, but for you as well.\n\nDo tell your team to work it out. It’s not your place to hold them accountable, since you’re part of the team as well. We all need each other’s guidance to make it through situations every now and then.\n\nDo not take sides. Doing this may seem like a good idea at the time, but that’s not a reason to brush your other team members aside just because you agree with one person. Each person is apart of the team for a reason, and it’s your job to work things out together. \n\n\n
  • When resolving a conflict in a group, these are a few things you do NOT want to do.\n\nNever ignore the situation. You may think it’s fine to just let things work themselves out, but they usually won’t.\n\nDo not quash it! Demanding that your team members grow up and get over it will surely make situations worse… not only for the situation, but for you as well.\n\nDo tell your team to work it out. It’s not your place to hold them accountable, since you’re part of the team as well. We all need each other’s guidance to make it through situations every now and then.\n\nDo not take sides. Doing this may seem like a good idea at the time, but that’s not a reason to brush your other team members aside just because you agree with one person. Each person is apart of the team for a reason, and it’s your job to work things out together. \n\n\n
  • When resolving a conflict in a group, these are a few things you do NOT want to do.\n\nNever ignore the situation. You may think it’s fine to just let things work themselves out, but they usually won’t.\n\nDo not quash it! Demanding that your team members grow up and get over it will surely make situations worse… not only for the situation, but for you as well.\n\nDo tell your team to work it out. It’s not your place to hold them accountable, since you’re part of the team as well. We all need each other’s guidance to make it through situations every now and then.\n\nDo not take sides. Doing this may seem like a good idea at the time, but that’s not a reason to brush your other team members aside just because you agree with one person. Each person is apart of the team for a reason, and it’s your job to work things out together. \n\n\n
  • When resolving a conflict in a group, these are a few things you do NOT want to do.\n\nNever ignore the situation. You may think it’s fine to just let things work themselves out, but they usually won’t.\n\nDo not quash it! Demanding that your team members grow up and get over it will surely make situations worse… not only for the situation, but for you as well.\n\nDo tell your team to work it out. It’s not your place to hold them accountable, since you’re part of the team as well. We all need each other’s guidance to make it through situations every now and then.\n\nDo not take sides. Doing this may seem like a good idea at the time, but that’s not a reason to brush your other team members aside just because you agree with one person. Each person is apart of the team for a reason, and it’s your job to work things out together. \n\n\n
  • When resolving a conflict in a group, these are a few things you do NOT want to do.\n\nNever ignore the situation. You may think it’s fine to just let things work themselves out, but they usually won’t.\n\nDo not quash it! Demanding that your team members grow up and get over it will surely make situations worse… not only for the situation, but for you as well.\n\nDo tell your team to work it out. It’s not your place to hold them accountable, since you’re part of the team as well. We all need each other’s guidance to make it through situations every now and then.\n\nDo not take sides. Doing this may seem like a good idea at the time, but that’s not a reason to brush your other team members aside just because you agree with one person. Each person is apart of the team for a reason, and it’s your job to work things out together. \n\n\n
  • When resolving a conflict in a group, these are a few things you do NOT want to do.\n\nNever ignore the situation. You may think it’s fine to just let things work themselves out, but they usually won’t.\n\nDo not quash it! Demanding that your team members grow up and get over it will surely make situations worse… not only for the situation, but for you as well.\n\nDo tell your team to work it out. It’s not your place to hold them accountable, since you’re part of the team as well. We all need each other’s guidance to make it through situations every now and then.\n\nDo not take sides. Doing this may seem like a good idea at the time, but that’s not a reason to brush your other team members aside just because you agree with one person. Each person is apart of the team for a reason, and it’s your job to work things out together. \n\n\n
  • Face-To-Face Teams work together and collaborate for a specific project at the same time and place and is always more personable when working with other team members. \n\nVirtual Teams also work together and collaborate for the purpose of a specific project however, they are usually located in different locations and conduct dialog by informal means of communication.\n\n
  • Face-To-Face Teams work together and collaborate for a specific project at the same time and place and is always more personable when working with other team members. \n\nVirtual Teams also work together and collaborate for the purpose of a specific project however, they are usually located in different locations and conduct dialog by informal means of communication.\n\n
  • Face-To-Face Teams work together and collaborate for a specific project at the same time and place and is always more personable when working with other team members. \n\nVirtual Teams also work together and collaborate for the purpose of a specific project however, they are usually located in different locations and conduct dialog by informal means of communication.\n\n
  • Face-To-Face Teams work together and collaborate for a specific project at the same time and place and is always more personable when working with other team members. \n\nVirtual Teams also work together and collaborate for the purpose of a specific project however, they are usually located in different locations and conduct dialog by informal means of communication.\n\n
  • Face-To-Face Teams work together and collaborate for a specific project at the same time and place and is always more personable when working with other team members. \n\nVirtual Teams also work together and collaborate for the purpose of a specific project however, they are usually located in different locations and conduct dialog by informal means of communication.\n\n
  • Face-to-Face has always been the most effective means of communication until the new wave of virtual communication made things easier for team members near and far. However, many experts still insist that face-to-face provides a way to build relationships with other team members, which could result in trust and higher performance rates. Gestures and visual cues are clearly present in face-to-face communication and enable others to learn more about their team members. Still it remains that most teams cannot travel to meet because it can be too costly. \n\n
  • Face-to-Face has always been the most effective means of communication until the new wave of virtual communication made things easier for team members near and far. However, many experts still insist that face-to-face provides a way to build relationships with other team members, which could result in trust and higher performance rates. Gestures and visual cues are clearly present in face-to-face communication and enable others to learn more about their team members. Still it remains that most teams cannot travel to meet because it can be too costly. \n\n
  • Face-to-Face has always been the most effective means of communication until the new wave of virtual communication made things easier for team members near and far. However, many experts still insist that face-to-face provides a way to build relationships with other team members, which could result in trust and higher performance rates. Gestures and visual cues are clearly present in face-to-face communication and enable others to learn more about their team members. Still it remains that most teams cannot travel to meet because it can be too costly. \n\n
  • Face-to-Face has always been the most effective means of communication until the new wave of virtual communication made things easier for team members near and far. However, many experts still insist that face-to-face provides a way to build relationships with other team members, which could result in trust and higher performance rates. Gestures and visual cues are clearly present in face-to-face communication and enable others to learn more about their team members. Still it remains that most teams cannot travel to meet because it can be too costly. \n\n
  • Face-to-Face has always been the most effective means of communication until the new wave of virtual communication made things easier for team members near and far. However, many experts still insist that face-to-face provides a way to build relationships with other team members, which could result in trust and higher performance rates. Gestures and visual cues are clearly present in face-to-face communication and enable others to learn more about their team members. Still it remains that most teams cannot travel to meet because it can be too costly. \n\n
  • Face-to-Face has always been the most effective means of communication until the new wave of virtual communication made things easier for team members near and far. However, many experts still insist that face-to-face provides a way to build relationships with other team members, which could result in trust and higher performance rates. Gestures and visual cues are clearly present in face-to-face communication and enable others to learn more about their team members. Still it remains that most teams cannot travel to meet because it can be too costly. \n\n
  • Face-to-Face has always been the most effective means of communication until the new wave of virtual communication made things easier for team members near and far. However, many experts still insist that face-to-face provides a way to build relationships with other team members, which could result in trust and higher performance rates. Gestures and visual cues are clearly present in face-to-face communication and enable others to learn more about their team members. Still it remains that most teams cannot travel to meet because it can be too costly. \n\n
  • Face-to-Face has always been the most effective means of communication until the new wave of virtual communication made things easier for team members near and far. However, many experts still insist that face-to-face provides a way to build relationships with other team members, which could result in trust and higher performance rates. Gestures and visual cues are clearly present in face-to-face communication and enable others to learn more about their team members. Still it remains that most teams cannot travel to meet because it can be too costly. \n\n
  • Virtual means of communication have made it possible for teams to collaborate with one another and they do not have to change their schedules or travel to meet. Since limitations exist with virtual teams, this establishes a need for the team to focus on current discussions. Virtual teams also face challenges when it comes to building relationships and trust since communication is usually limited. Then there could be problems when faced with the dynamics of different leadership types and decision-making within a group. But the most challenging could be the inability to effectively monitor or check the other team members’ progress or having team members choose not to do the work in the time requested. \n\n
  • Virtual means of communication have made it possible for teams to collaborate with one another and they do not have to change their schedules or travel to meet. Since limitations exist with virtual teams, this establishes a need for the team to focus on current discussions. Virtual teams also face challenges when it comes to building relationships and trust since communication is usually limited. Then there could be problems when faced with the dynamics of different leadership types and decision-making within a group. But the most challenging could be the inability to effectively monitor or check the other team members’ progress or having team members choose not to do the work in the time requested. \n\n
  • Virtual means of communication have made it possible for teams to collaborate with one another and they do not have to change their schedules or travel to meet. Since limitations exist with virtual teams, this establishes a need for the team to focus on current discussions. Virtual teams also face challenges when it comes to building relationships and trust since communication is usually limited. Then there could be problems when faced with the dynamics of different leadership types and decision-making within a group. But the most challenging could be the inability to effectively monitor or check the other team members’ progress or having team members choose not to do the work in the time requested. \n\n
  • Virtual means of communication have made it possible for teams to collaborate with one another and they do not have to change their schedules or travel to meet. Since limitations exist with virtual teams, this establishes a need for the team to focus on current discussions. Virtual teams also face challenges when it comes to building relationships and trust since communication is usually limited. Then there could be problems when faced with the dynamics of different leadership types and decision-making within a group. But the most challenging could be the inability to effectively monitor or check the other team members’ progress or having team members choose not to do the work in the time requested. \n\n
  • Virtual means of communication have made it possible for teams to collaborate with one another and they do not have to change their schedules or travel to meet. Since limitations exist with virtual teams, this establishes a need for the team to focus on current discussions. Virtual teams also face challenges when it comes to building relationships and trust since communication is usually limited. Then there could be problems when faced with the dynamics of different leadership types and decision-making within a group. But the most challenging could be the inability to effectively monitor or check the other team members’ progress or having team members choose not to do the work in the time requested. \n\n
  • Virtual means of communication have made it possible for teams to collaborate with one another and they do not have to change their schedules or travel to meet. Since limitations exist with virtual teams, this establishes a need for the team to focus on current discussions. Virtual teams also face challenges when it comes to building relationships and trust since communication is usually limited. Then there could be problems when faced with the dynamics of different leadership types and decision-making within a group. But the most challenging could be the inability to effectively monitor or check the other team members’ progress or having team members choose not to do the work in the time requested. \n\n
  • Virtual means of communication have made it possible for teams to collaborate with one another and they do not have to change their schedules or travel to meet. Since limitations exist with virtual teams, this establishes a need for the team to focus on current discussions. Virtual teams also face challenges when it comes to building relationships and trust since communication is usually limited. Then there could be problems when faced with the dynamics of different leadership types and decision-making within a group. But the most challenging could be the inability to effectively monitor or check the other team members’ progress or having team members choose not to do the work in the time requested. \n\n
  • Virtual means of communication have made it possible for teams to collaborate with one another and they do not have to change their schedules or travel to meet. Since limitations exist with virtual teams, this establishes a need for the team to focus on current discussions. Virtual teams also face challenges when it comes to building relationships and trust since communication is usually limited. Then there could be problems when faced with the dynamics of different leadership types and decision-making within a group. But the most challenging could be the inability to effectively monitor or check the other team members’ progress or having team members choose not to do the work in the time requested. \n\n
  • In order for to achieve success, team leaders should insure that they’re taking the right steps for motivating their team. First, it’s important to talk TO your team members, not AT them. The best way to let your team members know that they are valued is to talk to them and ensure effective communication.\n\nBe generous. Nothing is more motivating than knowing that your knowledge and efforts are appreciated; so let your employees or team members know that you’ve noticed the work that they’ve contributed.\n\nAvoiding micromanagement is also a good idea for team leaders. It’s fine to check in on everyone every now and then to ensure effective communication, but don’t hover or intimidate. It will only make your team members nervous and could cause them to make mistakes. Most importantly, it’s important to make them feel comfortable and let them know that you’re there if they need anything.\n\nLastly, pick team players. No matter how good of a team leader you are, there will be times when you just can’t motive an employee or team member. There could be members in the group that just don’t want to participate… but don’t let that ruin your team goals. Group dynamics are very important; so find team members who are a great fit with your group.\n\n
  • In order for to achieve success, team leaders should insure that they’re taking the right steps for motivating their team. First, it’s important to talk TO your team members, not AT them. The best way to let your team members know that they are valued is to talk to them and ensure effective communication.\n\nBe generous. Nothing is more motivating than knowing that your knowledge and efforts are appreciated; so let your employees or team members know that you’ve noticed the work that they’ve contributed.\n\nAvoiding micromanagement is also a good idea for team leaders. It’s fine to check in on everyone every now and then to ensure effective communication, but don’t hover or intimidate. It will only make your team members nervous and could cause them to make mistakes. Most importantly, it’s important to make them feel comfortable and let them know that you’re there if they need anything.\n\nLastly, pick team players. No matter how good of a team leader you are, there will be times when you just can’t motive an employee or team member. There could be members in the group that just don’t want to participate… but don’t let that ruin your team goals. Group dynamics are very important; so find team members who are a great fit with your group.\n\n
  • In order for to achieve success, team leaders should insure that they’re taking the right steps for motivating their team. First, it’s important to talk TO your team members, not AT them. The best way to let your team members know that they are valued is to talk to them and ensure effective communication.\n\nBe generous. Nothing is more motivating than knowing that your knowledge and efforts are appreciated; so let your employees or team members know that you’ve noticed the work that they’ve contributed.\n\nAvoiding micromanagement is also a good idea for team leaders. It’s fine to check in on everyone every now and then to ensure effective communication, but don’t hover or intimidate. It will only make your team members nervous and could cause them to make mistakes. Most importantly, it’s important to make them feel comfortable and let them know that you’re there if they need anything.\n\nLastly, pick team players. No matter how good of a team leader you are, there will be times when you just can’t motive an employee or team member. There could be members in the group that just don’t want to participate… but don’t let that ruin your team goals. Group dynamics are very important; so find team members who are a great fit with your group.\n\n
  • In order for to achieve success, team leaders should insure that they’re taking the right steps for motivating their team. First, it’s important to talk TO your team members, not AT them. The best way to let your team members know that they are valued is to talk to them and ensure effective communication.\n\nBe generous. Nothing is more motivating than knowing that your knowledge and efforts are appreciated; so let your employees or team members know that you’ve noticed the work that they’ve contributed.\n\nAvoiding micromanagement is also a good idea for team leaders. It’s fine to check in on everyone every now and then to ensure effective communication, but don’t hover or intimidate. It will only make your team members nervous and could cause them to make mistakes. Most importantly, it’s important to make them feel comfortable and let them know that you’re there if they need anything.\n\nLastly, pick team players. No matter how good of a team leader you are, there will be times when you just can’t motive an employee or team member. There could be members in the group that just don’t want to participate… but don’t let that ruin your team goals. Group dynamics are very important; so find team members who are a great fit with your group.\n\n
  • In order for to achieve success, team leaders should insure that they’re taking the right steps for motivating their team. First, it’s important to talk TO your team members, not AT them. The best way to let your team members know that they are valued is to talk to them and ensure effective communication.\n\nBe generous. Nothing is more motivating than knowing that your knowledge and efforts are appreciated; so let your employees or team members know that you’ve noticed the work that they’ve contributed.\n\nAvoiding micromanagement is also a good idea for team leaders. It’s fine to check in on everyone every now and then to ensure effective communication, but don’t hover or intimidate. It will only make your team members nervous and could cause them to make mistakes. Most importantly, it’s important to make them feel comfortable and let them know that you’re there if they need anything.\n\nLastly, pick team players. No matter how good of a team leader you are, there will be times when you just can’t motive an employee or team member. There could be members in the group that just don’t want to participate… but don’t let that ruin your team goals. Group dynamics are very important; so find team members who are a great fit with your group.\n\n
  • In order for to achieve success, team leaders should insure that they’re taking the right steps for motivating their team. First, it’s important to talk TO your team members, not AT them. The best way to let your team members know that they are valued is to talk to them and ensure effective communication.\n\nBe generous. Nothing is more motivating than knowing that your knowledge and efforts are appreciated; so let your employees or team members know that you’ve noticed the work that they’ve contributed.\n\nAvoiding micromanagement is also a good idea for team leaders. It’s fine to check in on everyone every now and then to ensure effective communication, but don’t hover or intimidate. It will only make your team members nervous and could cause them to make mistakes. Most importantly, it’s important to make them feel comfortable and let them know that you’re there if they need anything.\n\nLastly, pick team players. No matter how good of a team leader you are, there will be times when you just can’t motive an employee or team member. There could be members in the group that just don’t want to participate… but don’t let that ruin your team goals. Group dynamics are very important; so find team members who are a great fit with your group.\n\n
  • In order for to achieve success, team leaders should insure that they’re taking the right steps for motivating their team. First, it’s important to talk TO your team members, not AT them. The best way to let your team members know that they are valued is to talk to them and ensure effective communication.\n\nBe generous. Nothing is more motivating than knowing that your knowledge and efforts are appreciated; so let your employees or team members know that you’ve noticed the work that they’ve contributed.\n\nAvoiding micromanagement is also a good idea for team leaders. It’s fine to check in on everyone every now and then to ensure effective communication, but don’t hover or intimidate. It will only make your team members nervous and could cause them to make mistakes. Most importantly, it’s important to make them feel comfortable and let them know that you’re there if they need anything.\n\nLastly, pick team players. No matter how good of a team leader you are, there will be times when you just can’t motive an employee or team member. There could be members in the group that just don’t want to participate… but don’t let that ruin your team goals. Group dynamics are very important; so find team members who are a great fit with your group.\n\n
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  • MLR Team2 sec.17 Team project

    1. 1. Terenia Autrey Paris Campbell Barbara Gaskins Jay Henry Jess Hernanadez Kristen Jerkins John Mielke STRATEGIC FORCE Strategies of Effective Teams MLR Te am 2 S ec ti on 17
    2. 2. (Jason Morgan, 2010)
    3. 3. Team Development StagesForming Members get to know each other.Storming Strengths and weaknesses are defined.Norming Project starts to take shape.Performing Members perform together to reach a common goal. (Jason Morgan, 2010)
    4. 4. Team Development Stages
    5. 5. Team Development StagesAdjourning Team dismantles and takes with them a common knowledge.Transforming The team continues to work and gain knowledge together as a team. delay
    6. 6. (Robert Fisher, 1981)
    7. 7. Team NegotiationWhat is Negotiation? When two or more people strive to reach an agreement on a certain matter.Principled Negotiation Process Separate the people from the problem. Focus on interests, not positions. Generate several options before deciding on what to do. (Robert Fisher, 1981)
    8. 8. Team Negotiation Tips(Ed Brodow, 2011)
    9. 9. Team Negotiation TipsTeam Negotiation Tips State your opinions Listen Do your homework Don’t be in a hurry Don’t take it personally (Ed Brodow, 2011)
    10. 10. (Carole Townsley, 2010)
    11. 11. Conflict ResolutionSteps to resolving conflict Prepare for resolution Understand the situation Reach agreement (Carole Townsley, 2010)
    12. 12. Conflict Resolution(Cynthia Clay, 2007)
    13. 13. Conflict ResolutionWhat not to do Ignore it Quash it Tell them to work it out Take sides (Cynthia Clay, 2007)
    14. 14. Face-To-Face vs. Virtual Team ChallengesFace-To-Face Teams Communication is more personable.Virtual Teams Communication is long distance.
    15. 15. Face-To-Face Teams
    16. 16. Face-To-Face TeamsProsStronger relational linksGreater trust buildingCan result in higher performanceVisual cues and gesturesEasier to learn each other’s strengthsConsTravel can be to costly
    17. 17. Virtual Teams
    18. 18. Virtual TeamsProsNo need to change scheduleNo travel requiredEasier to establish more focused discussionsConsHarder to build teamwork and trustLess time to build relationshipsInability to monitor team members work
    19. 19. (Tom Vaughton, 2011)
    20. 20. Motivating a TeamMotivating a Team Talk TO them, not AT them Be generous Avoid micromanagement Pick team players (Tom Vaughton, 2011)
    21. 21. The Power of Teamwork
    22. 22. The Power of Teamwork
    23. 23. Resources Brodow, E. (2011) Ten tips for negotiation in 2011. Retrieved September 14th, 2011 from http://www.brodow.com/Articles/NegotiatingTips.htmlClay, C. (2007) Resolving team conflict – nine steps to constructive resolution. Retrieved September 14th, 2011 from http://ezinearticles.com/?Resolving-Team-Conflict-Nine-Steps-to- Constructive-Resolution&id=445375Fisher, R. (1981) Getting to yes. Retrieved September 14th, 2011 from http://www.colorado.edu/conflict/peace/treatment/pricneg.htmMorgan, J. (2010) Forming, storming, norming, performing, adjourning andtransforming. Retrieved September 13th, 2011 from http://www.jmorganmarketing.com/ forming-storming-norming-performing-adjourning-and-transforming/Townsley, C. (2010) Resolving conflict in work teams. Retrieved September 14th from http://www.innovativeteambuilding.co.uk/pages/articles/conflicts.htm
    24. 24. Resources Vaughton, T. (2011) Five techniques for motivating a team. Retrieved September 16th, 2011 from http://managementhelp.org/blogs/team-performance/2011/04/14/five-techniques- for-motivating-a-team/Warkentin, M., Sayeed, L., and Hightower, Ross (1997) Virtual Teams Versus Face-to-Face Teams: An Exploratory Study of a Web-based Conference System Retrieved September 16, 2011 from http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_qa3713/is_199710/ai_n8758806/pg_10/? tag=mantle_skin;contentHeller, R., Laurito, A., Johnson, K., Martin, M., Fitzpatrick, and R., Sundin, K. (2010) Global Teams: Trends, Challenges and Solutions Retrieved September 15, 2011 from http://www.ilr.cornell.edu/cahrs/hrSpectrum/upload/ Spring10Meeting_VirtualTeamsWhitePapers.pdf

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