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Email Requests in English: Implications for TESOL

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Email Requests in English: Implications for TESOL

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Email Requests in English: Implications for TESOL

  1. 1. Email Requests in English: Implications for TESOL Abigail Reynolds and Tatiana Shulyateva Northern Arizona University Master’s Student Forum March 25, 2015
  2. 2. Overview  Impact & Motivation  Studies  Implications  Suggestions for Future Research  Q&A 2
  3. 3. Impact & Motivation  Successful requests save face.  Successful requests help reach your goal.  Emails are widely used.  Knowledge about requests helps make better requests.  Knowledge about requests helps teach how to construct requests. 3
  4. 4. 4 Study Data Sender Recipient Rater Biesenbach- Lucas (2005) authentic 382 NSs & 151 NNSs female faculty member researcher Iimuro (2006) authentic 4 NNSs professor researcher Stephens, et al. (2009) elicited 1 NSs -> 4 modified emails faculty member 152 NS instructors; 183 NS students Hendriks (2010) elicited NNSs employer 110 NSs; 158 NSs Knupsky, Nagy-Bell (2011) elicited 66 NSs peers and professors 2 NSs Merrison, et al. (2012) authentic 190 NSs female faculty member researchers
  5. 5. Implications: Status  Consider difference in status when you make email requests (Hendriks, 2010; Knupsky & Nagy-Bell, 2011)  e.g., student to student vs. student to professor 5
  6. 6. Implications: Imposition  Consider how imposing your request is (Biesenbach-Lucas, 2010)  e.g., requesting an appointment during office hours vs. requesting feedback vs. requesting an extension 6
  7. 7. Ways to Make Your Request More Polite  Use proper grammar and punctuation (Stephens et al., 2009)  No text language (Stephens et al., 2009)  e.g., R U free?  Regardless of age  Use embedded constructions  I was wondering if (e.g., Hendriks, 2010; Biesenbach-Lucas, 2007) 7
  8. 8. Language That May Not Affect Politeness  Using Could may not be more polite than using Can (Hendriks, 2010)  Insertion of Please may not make your request more polite (Biesenbach-Lucas, 2007)  Insertion of Possibly may not make your request more polite (Hendriks, 2010) 8
  9. 9. Implications: Culture  Consider in which culture your students will be using English  Reasons (e.g., employment, health)  Greetings (e.g., Hi, Dear Dr. X)  Hedging (e.g., just, might) (Merrison et al., 2012) 9
  10. 10. Structure  Subject line  Term of address used to refer to teacher  Self-identification  Account  Request  Sign off (Based on Iimuro, 2006; Merrison et al., 2012) 10
  11. 11. Suggestions for Future Research  Examining the difference in perception of email requests between professors from different disciplines  Comparing of constructions and judgments of email requests in different cultures 11
  12. 12. Thank you! Q&A or email us with your requests: Abigail Reynolds – ap2265@nau.edu Tatiana Shulyateva – tds245@nau.edu

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