Open All. Open Policies for User Rights and Freedoms in Science and Education (and elsewhere)

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Slides for a speech given at the 3rd Global Congress on IPR and Public Interest in Cape Town, on 11th December 2014. The talk was a remixed and updated version of one given several weeks earlier at the Berlin11 Satellite Event on Open Access. The key idea of "Open All" is the same, but focus is shifted from an OA perspective to one that deals more with educational issues as well

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Open All. Open Policies for User Rights and Freedoms in Science and Education (and elsewhere)

  1. 1. Open All Open Policies for User Rights and Freedoms in science and education (and elsewhere) Alek Tarkowski Centrum Cyfrowe Projekt: Polska Creative Commons Poland
  2. 2. Open …. ? •  OA has developed multiple standards, tools, models that can be reused in other sectors
  3. 3. „Open All” • Open = Access to Content + User Rights • Everyone has a particular point of entry / point of reference • Access vs. (Re)use – the latter more problematic
  4. 4. „Open All” •  Free / Open Software • Open Access … and Open Science • Open education (HE, K-12, preschool) •  Open data: Public Sector Information, Public Data •  Open GLAM: heritage, cultural sector content
  5. 5. „Open All” •  An ongoing, gradual extension of the open model / philosophy to all spheres of activity. •  What is the key area of activity? •  Is „open convergence” possible, towards a single standard of open? •  What are key areas of activity? •  What are strategic areas of activity?
  6. 6. From grassroots activity to top-down policies •  „Open anything” begins with grassroots activity and develops into a policy debate over time •  Open data / PSI an obvious outlier
  7. 7. From grassroots activity to top-down policies •  Policies provide strong leverage for implementation of open standards •  Public character of content a strong argument for openness: the commons •  Policies lack the element of personal, voluntary decision
  8. 8. point of reference: OA •  Advantages: •  Mature content production and distribution model (also from an economic perspective) •  20+ years of experience w/ implementation •  Precise goals / tools / theory of change – „modest” in a good sense (vs. open science) •  Clear institutional policy model •  Challenges: •  (relatively) low attention paid to licensing •  Low content reuse
  9. 9. point of reference: OER •  Advantages: •  Clear arguments about importance of reuse •  Greater potential for grassroots involvement •  Challenges: •  Less mature implementation model •  Tools / standards for OER •  Ongoing licensing debate •  More varied content makes developing a theory of change di"cult •  Reuse: high potential / still little proof
  10. 10. Open all: template • Repositories • Metadata • Author / publisher / intermediary compliance • Legal / licensing standards • Use / reuse practices (by users)
  11. 11. LAW
  12. 12. OER de"nition •  Hewlett Foundation „OER are teaching, learning, and research resources that reside in the public domain or have been released under an intellectual property license that permits their free use and repurposing by others.”
  13. 13. OER de"nition •  UNESCO „teaching, learning and research materials in any medium, digital or otherwise, that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation and redistribution by others with no or limited restrictions.”
  14. 14. OER de"nition •  UNESCO „teaching, learning and research materials in any medium, digital or otherwise, that reside in the public domain or have been released under an open license that permits no-cost access, use, adaptation and redistribution by others with no or limited restrictions.”
  15. 15. Licensing debate •  Strong open licensing is crucial for OER and other areas, where reuse is of key importance (open data) •  Public funding – strong argument for fully open licensing •  Open Knowledge De#nition as a underlying / uni#ying mechanism for standards negotiation
  16. 16. Beyond the licensing debate •  Open Access vs. Text and Data Mining
  17. 17. Poland
  18. 18. Poland: Open Textbooks •  Context: OER in Poland in last 5 years •  Coalition for Open Education (KOED) •  Public OER projects •  Grassroots activities •  2012: Open Textbooks project •  CC BY + WCAG + open format •  No policy behind it
  19. 19. Open Public Resources Act •  General model from the „Open textbooks” project •  Complimentary to Public Sector Information rules -> together would form a general open norm for public content •  Education + science + culture •  2013: Bill proposal
  20. 20. Europe: Open all? •  OA: Framework Programs -> Horizon 20202 •  OER: „Opening Up Educaton” •  Open data: Reuse Directive •  But also … Copyright Directive: exceptions & limitations
  21. 21. Openwashing •  MOOC (MOPENOC) •  Mark Lester – how are MOOCs open: •  Non-selective •  Not tied to physical location •  No limitations on number of students •  Non full-time, no long commitment •  Low or no cost •  MFLEXIBLEOC? •  Why don’t MOOCs „get” openness?
  22. 22. Opening Up Education •  „Thanks to Open Educational Resources (OER), and namely MOOCs, teachers and education institutions can now reach thousands of learners from all #ve continents simultaneously, showcasing that language is not always a barrier.”
  23. 23. Opening Up Education •  Pragmatic approach instead of an ideological one? •  (which OA already knows this very well) •  Educators, students don’t necessarily care about openness – they care about a$ordability, e"ciency, ease of use, quality •  And therefore policymakers care about this too
  24. 24. Thank you!

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