A model of burnout and life satisfaction
amongst nurses
Authors: Demerouti, E.1
; Bakker, A.B.2
; Nachreiner, F.1
; Schauf...
model including each of these relationships was tested simultaneously with structural
equations modelling. Results confirm...
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Evangelia Demerouti PhD, Arnold B. Bakker PhD, Friedhelm Nachreiner PhD & Wilmar B.
Schaufeli PhD
1
Carl von Ossietzky Uni...
Evangelia Demerouti PhD, Arnold B. Bakker PhD, Friedhelm Nachreiner PhD & Wilmar B.
Schaufeli PhD
1
Carl von Ossietzky Uni...
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A model of burnout and life satisfaction amongst nurses

  1. 1. A model of burnout and life satisfaction amongst nurses Authors: Demerouti, E.1 ; Bakker, A.B.2 ; Nachreiner, F.1 ; Schaufeli, W.B.2 Source: Journal of Advanced Nursing, Volume 32, Number 2, 1 August 2000 , pp. 454- 464(11) Publisher: Blackwell Publishing • < previous article • | • next article > • | • view table of contents Key: - Free Content - New Content - Subscribed Content - Free Trial Content Abstract: A model of burnout and life satisfaction amongst nurses This study, among 109 German nurses, tested a theoretically derived model of burnout and overall life satisfaction. The model discriminates between two conceptually different categories of working conditions, namely job demands and job resources. It was hypothesized that: (1) job demands, such as demanding contacts with patients and time pressure, are most predictive of exhaustion; (2) job resources, such as (poor) rewards and (lack of) participation in decision making, are most predictive of disengagement from work; and (3) job demands and job resources have an indirect impact on nurses' life satisfaction, through the experience of burnout (i.e., exhaustion and disengagement). A
  2. 2. model including each of these relationships was tested simultaneously with structural equations modelling. Results confirm the strong effects of job demands and job resources on exhaustion and disengagement respectively, and the mediating role of burnout between the working conditions and life satisfaction. These findings contribute to existing knowledge about antecedents and consequences of occupational burnout, and provide guidelines for interventions aimed at preventing or reducing burnout among nurses. Keywords: job demands; job resources; burnout; life satisfaction; nursing; exhaustion; disengagement; working conditions; stress Document Type: Research article Affiliations: 1: Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Oldenburg, Germany 2: Utrecht University, Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht, The Netherlands The full text article is temporarily unavailable. We apologise for the inconvenience. Please try again later. • < previous article • | • next article > • | • view table of contents Back to top Key: - Free Content - New Content - Subscribed Content - Free Trial Content Share this item with others: These icons link to social bookmarking sites where readers can share and discover new web pages. • • • •
  3. 3. • • • • • • • • • • • Website © 2010 Ingenta. Article copyright remains with the publisher, society or author(s) as specified within the article. • Terms and Conditions • Privacy Policy • Information for advertisers Click here for Page Help Browse Search Electronic content Journal or book title Advanced search • Search history Shopping cart Tools • Print • Article access options • Export options o EndNote o BibTEX • Linking options o IngentaConnect o OpenURL • Alerting options
  4. 4. o Receive New Issue Alert o Latest TOC RSS Feed o Recent Issues RSS Feed • Bookmarking options o Marked List o Add to Marked List o Social Bookmarking Links Sign in User name Password Remember me • forgotten your password? • Sign in via Athens Need to register? Sign up here Text size: A | A | A | A Work Context, Personal Control, and Burnout amongst Nurses Jacqueline Allen School of Psychology, Deakin University, Burwood, Australia David Mellor School of Psychology, Deakin University, Burwood, Australia While situational factors such as high workloads have been found to be predictive of burnout, not all people in the same work context develop burnout. This suggests that individual factors are implicated in susceptibility to burnout. We investigated the relationships between care type (acute/chronic), neuroticism, control (primary/secondary), and symptoms of burnout (exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced professional efficacy) amongst 21 chronic care nurses and 83 acute care nurses working in a public hospital in regional Australia. Similar levels of burnout symptomatology and neuroticism were found in each group of nurses, and neuroticism was found to be associated with exhaustion, cynicism, and reduced professional efficacy in the total sample of nurses. Our prediction that primary control would protect against burnout symptoms in acute care nurses was supported only for professional efficacy, and the prediction that secondary control would protect against burnout in chronic care nurses was not supported. Western Journal of Nursing Research, Vol. 24, No. 8, 905-917 (2002) DOI: 10.1177/019394502237701 A model of burnout and life satisfaction amongst nurses
  5. 5. Evangelia Demerouti PhD, Arnold B. Bakker PhD, Friedhelm Nachreiner PhD & Wilmar B. Schaufeli PhD 1 Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Oldenburg, Germany, 2 Utrecht University, Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht, The Netherlands Correspondence to: Evangelia Demerouti KEYWORDS job demands • job resources • burnout • life satisfaction • nursing • exhaustion • disengagement • working conditions • stress ABSTRACT A model of burnout and life satisfaction amongst nurses This study, among 109 German nurses, tested a theoretically derived model of burnout and overall life satisfaction. The model discriminates between two conceptually different categories of working conditions, namely job demands and job resources. It was hypothesized that: (1) job demands, such as demanding contacts with patients and time pressure, are most predictive of exhaustion; (2) job resources, such as (poor) rewards and (lack of) participation in decision making, are most predictive of disengagement from work; and (3) job demands and job resources have an indirect impact on nurses' life satisfaction, through the experience of burnout (i.e., exhaustion and disengagement). A model including each of these relationships was tested simultaneously with structural equations modelling. Results confirm the strong effects of job demands and job resources on exhaustion and disengagement respectively, and the mediating role of burnout between the working conditions and life satisfaction. These findings contribute to existing knowledge about antecedents and consequences of occupational burnout, and provide guidelines for interventions aimed at preventing or reducing burnout among nurses. DIGITAL OBJECT IDENTIFIER (DOI) 10.1046/j.1365-2648.2000.01496.x About DOI
  6. 6. Evangelia Demerouti PhD, Arnold B. Bakker PhD, Friedhelm Nachreiner PhD & Wilmar B. Schaufeli PhD 1 Carl von Ossietzky Universität Oldenburg, Department of Work and Organizational Psychology, Oldenburg, Germany, 2 Utrecht University, Department of Social and Organizational Psychology, Utrecht, The Netherlands Correspondence to: Evangelia Demerouti KEYWORDS job demands • job resources • burnout • life satisfaction • nursing • exhaustion • disengagement • working conditions • stress ABSTRACT A model of burnout and life satisfaction amongst nurses This study, among 109 German nurses, tested a theoretically derived model of burnout and overall life satisfaction. The model discriminates between two conceptually different categories of working conditions, namely job demands and job resources. It was hypothesized that: (1) job demands, such as demanding contacts with patients and time pressure, are most predictive of exhaustion; (2) job resources, such as (poor) rewards and (lack of) participation in decision making, are most predictive of disengagement from work; and (3) job demands and job resources have an indirect impact on nurses' life satisfaction, through the experience of burnout (i.e., exhaustion and disengagement). A model including each of these relationships was tested simultaneously with structural equations modelling. Results confirm the strong effects of job demands and job resources on exhaustion and disengagement respectively, and the mediating role of burnout between the working conditions and life satisfaction. These findings contribute to existing knowledge about antecedents and consequences of occupational burnout, and provide guidelines for interventions aimed at preventing or reducing burnout among nurses. DIGITAL OBJECT IDENTIFIER (DOI) 10.1046/j.1365-2648.2000.01496.x About DOI

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