Unit 3 pp #6 6th grade

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Unit 3 pp #6 6th grade

  1. 1. Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Chapter 6<br />The Connection Between Florida and Africa<br /><ul><li>About 240 million years ago, the areas that would become Florida and northwest Africa were connected parts of the the supercontinent Pangaea.
  2. 2. 40 million years later, Florida and northwest Africa separated as the Central Atlantic Ocean formed.
  3. 3. Similar types of rocks are found in both areas.</li></li></ul><li>Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Chapter 6<br />
  4. 4. Chapter 6<br />Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Building Present-Day Florida<br /><ul><li>More than 100 million years after Pangaea broke apart, the area that would become Florida sank slowly and was flooded by shallow seas.
  5. 5. Marine organisms thrived in these seas. As they died, the calcium carbonate in their shells and skeletons was preserved as rock, primarily limestone.</li></li></ul><li>Chapter 6<br />Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Building Present-Day Florida, continued<br /><ul><li>Over time, this limestone formed layer after layer and became very thick.
  6. 6. These layers formed a platform, an area of continent that is composed of flat-lying layers of sedimentary rock.
  7. 7. This platform is known as the Florida Platform.</li></li></ul><li>Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Chapter 6<br />
  8. 8. Chapter 6<br />Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Building Present-Day Florida, continued<br /><ul><li>Erosion of the Appalachian Mountains Limestone continued to accumulate until 30 to 35 million years ago.
  9. 9. At that time, the Appalachian Mountains north of Florida began to erode very rapidly.
  10. 10. Sediments from the Appalachians were deposited over the platform, first over the northern part and later over the southern part.</li></li></ul><li>Chapter 6<br />Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Building Present-Day Florida, continued<br /><ul><li>The Florida Platform, now composed of thick layers of limestone beneath thin layers of sedimentary rock, remained underwater.
  11. 11. Florida During the Ice Ages Over the last 1.8 million years, parts of the Florida Platform emerged and disappeared beneath the sea several times.
  12. 12. These changes happened during glacial and interglacial periods.</li></li></ul><li>Chapter 6<br />Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Building Present-Day Florida, continued<br /><ul><li>During glacial periods, sea level dropped, exposing the Florida Platform.
  13. 13. During interglacial periods, sea level rose and water covered much of the Florida Platform.
  14. 14. Waves and currents eroded rock and spread sediments across the platform. Deposition created sand ridges and other features seen across Florida today.</li></li></ul><li>Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Chapter 6<br />The Geology of Florida<br />
  15. 15. Chapter 6<br />Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Geology of the Florida Keys<br /><ul><li>The Florida Keys, an arc of low islands at the tip of South Florida, also began to form about 1.8 million years ago.
  16. 16. Corals established themselves in the shallow sea along the edge of the Florida Platform.
  17. 17. These corals formed reefs. As one reef died, a new one formed on top of its remains.</li></li></ul><li>Chapter 6<br />Section 3 Geology of Florida<br />Geology of the Florida Keys, continued<br /><ul><li>Eventually, dead reef material accumulated to a thickness of 25-60 m.
  18. 18. When sea level dropped, these reefs were exposed. They form the present-day upper Florida Keys.
  19. 19. The lower Florida Keys formed as sand accumulated behind the reef, covered it, and eventually emerged from beneath the ocean.</li>

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