Promulgating Ideas in Twitter Society:
       Our Purpose in Community &
               Conversations
                    ...
First,
I
should
tell
you
a
bit
about
myself
and
my
background.
I
exist
at
the
intersection
of
social
and
new
media,
or
as
...
The Evolution




So
this
is
my
evolution.

This
is
how
I
went
from
digital
documenting
to
blogging
to
vlogging
to
now
mic...
Twitter Society

            Characteristics of a
             Twitter Society
 •A space where cultural exchanges take pla...
Twitter as Community?

         Is Twitter a False Sense
             of Community?
         •@seanpadilla: 140 characters...
Tweeting the Personal

            When Tweeting
            Gets Personal
        •Pick your Twitter battles wisely.

   ...
Tweeting Professionally




                                                                                      Pick you...
Let’s Converse!
                                            Twitter.com/taralconley (@taralconley)

                      ...
Cite/Site References
•“Twitter’s Impact on th News & Media Cycle” by Ross Dawson
     •http://rossdawsonblog.com/weblog/ar...
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Promulgating Ideas In Twitter Society PRESENTATION W/ NOTES

  1. 1. Promulgating Ideas in Twitter Society: Our Purpose in Community & Conversations Tara L. Conley (@taralconley) Writer, Blogger, Snew Media Consultant YouthNoise.com | HeatingOil.com | The Life and Times of a Blogger October 2009 Good
afternoon.
It’s
a
pleasure
to
be
with
you
all
today.
I
want
to
thank
Bob
Fine,
Kevin
Powell,
and
the
entire
CTC
folks
for
inviting
me
to
 speak
with
you.

Like
Bob
said,
my
name
is
Tara
Conley
and
I
will
be
talking
with
you
today
about
sharing
and
dispersing
ideas
via
Twitter
–
or
 Twitter
Society,
as
I
like
to
think
of
it.

  2. 2. First,
I
should
tell
you
a
bit
about
myself
and
my
background.
I
exist
at
the
intersection
of
social
and
new
media,
or
as
I
like
to
call
it
‘snew’
media.
I
self‐ identify
as
the
hardest
working
young
woman
in
snew
media
because
I’m
all
over
the
place
–
as
you
can
see.

 My
fascination
and
participation
with
snew
media
began
in
2005
when
hurricane
Katrina
hit
the
Gulf
Coast.

I
just
finished
my
BA
in
English,
and
I
was
 teaching
at
a
charter
school
in
Houston,
Texas.

Survivors
of
hurricane
Katrina
were
bussed
to
The
Houston
Reliant
Center,
which
was
basically
my
backyard
 at
the
time.

My
best
friend
and
I
wanted
to
volunteer
and
so
we
did.

I
decided
to
take
a
video
camera
with
me
to
document
our
experiences
as
volunteers
 and
to
create
a
digital
archive
of
one
of
the
most
devastating
storms
in
U.S.
history.

I
became
a
citizen
journalist
overnight.

The
footage
later
turned
into
a
 mini‐documentary
called
A
Region
of
Survivors
(2006).

I
finished
the
doc
while
in
graduate
school
in
2006.

It’s
currently
available
on
CurrentTV.com
and
 has
been
shown
in
Women’s
Studies,
Family
Studies,
Sociology,
and
Psychology
graduate
courses.
At
the
end
of
graduate
school,
my
fascination
with
digital
 media
continued.
I
ended
up
producing
another
mini‐doc
about
the
Jena
Six
controversy
in
Louisiana
called
The
Foe
Within:
A
Docupoem
in
Three
Parts
 (2008).

This
doc
served
as
part
of
my
Master’s
thesis
Confronting
and
Transforming
the
Foe
Within:
An
Application
of
Nepantla
Theory
(2008).

 Around
this
time,
I
also
began
blogging
on
Myspace
and
Blogger.

I
also
started
my
own
YouTube
channel
where
I
could
express
myself
musically
by
singing
 to
thousands
of
strangers
through
a
webcam.

After
grad
school,
I
was
able
to
parlay
my
personal
fascination
with
snew
media
into
a
profession.

 In
2008,
I
began
working
as
a
blogger
for
YouthNoise.com,
a
social
media
non‐profit
in
San
Francisco.
YN
is
currently
partnered
with
Link
TV
and
Nike
with
 our
PlayCity
campaign.
I
cover
sport
for
good
stories
and
interview
athletes,
community
leaders,
and
activists
that
use
sports
and
play
to
empower
the
 communities
around
them.

I
also
worked
as
a
communications
and
political
associate
for
Brave
New
Films
in
Los
Angeles.

BNF
is
a
political
and
social
 activist
non‐profit
organization
that
mainly
uses
digital
media
to
promulgate
social
justice
ideas
around
the
world.
Currently,
(in
addition
to
working
for
 YouthNoise)
I
also
work
at
HeatingOil.com
as
their
new
media
manager.

I
manage
all
of
their
social
networks
and
their
blog.

  3. 3. The Evolution So
this
is
my
evolution.

This
is
how
I
went
from
digital
documenting
to
blogging
to
vlogging
to
now
microblogging.
Mind
you,
these
things
 aren’t
necessarily
static
or
independent
of
each
other,
I
continue
to
participate
in
all
of
these
platforms
simultaneously
(both
in
my
personal
 and
professional
life).

Twitter
is
my
newest
fascination.


I’ve
been
on
Twitter
for
almost
a
year,
but
I’ve
been
active
within
the
past
two
 months.
I
use
Twitter
to
promote
and
spread
my
own
ideas,
the
ideas
of
colleagues,
employers,
friends,
and
as
a
way
to
expand
my
 professional
and
personal
networks.

People
are
discovering
me
and
I’m
discovering
others
all
in
this
social
space
called
‘Twitter
Society’.
  4. 4. Twitter Society Characteristics of a Twitter Society •A space where cultural exchanges take place and un/written rules, etiquette, and behaviors are thusly devised and supported by the society. •Written Language* • @user, RT (retweet), # (hashtags), H/T (hat tip) •Etiquette Rules •Acknowledge the Tweeter before you RT! •Social Clicks •Politicking/Rules of Engagement •Network Spaces •Political, academic, entertainment, music, social issues/non-profit •Twitter Jail! *See: danah boyd’s “Tweet, Tweet, Retweet: Conversational Aspects of Retweeting on Twitter” (2010) I
refer
to
Twitter
as
a
‘society’
to
denote
a
space
where
cultural
exchanges
take
place
and
unwritten
(and
written)
rules,
etiquette,
and
 behaviors
are
thusly
devised
and
supported.

Perhaps
what
makes
Twitter
different
from
many
of
the
other
social
networking
sites
(besides
 being
considered
a
microblogging
platform)
is
the
way
in
which
written
language
is
overwhelmingly
specific
to
this
snew
media
platform.

 Tweet
language
(i.e.
RT,
hashtags,
the
@user
acronym)
is
even
being
adopted
within
other
platforms
like
Myspace
and
Facebook
(Facebook
 just
recently
incorporated
its
@mention
function).

Like
in
any
cultural
space,
social
clicks,
networking,
and
the
art
of
politicking
exist.

The
trick
 is
knowing
how
to
navigate
within
this
new
space
while
remaining
part
of
the
conversation.

Incidentally,
there’s
also
a
Twitter
jail,
where
 apparently
if
you
tweet
more
than
100
tweets
in
an
hour,
Twitter
will
freeze
your
account
for
an
hour
or
more
until
you’ve
learned
your
lesson.

 I
have
yet
to
go
to
Twitter
jail,
but
from
what
my
fellow
Tweeters
tells
me,
it
sounds
absolutely
dreadful!
For
more
on
issues
of
class
and
 languaging
via
social
networking,
I
highly
suggest
referencing
danah
boyd’s
research
in
this
area.
It’s
fascinating.
  5. 5. Twitter as Community? Is Twitter a False Sense of Community? •@seanpadilla: 140 characters @ a time can't build community on its own, but it can definitely plant a seed... •@littlebrownjen: Hmmm..maybe a new kind of community? •When Twitter trends, so does the nation. •Twitter has had one of biggest impacts on the news cycle, firstly by often being the first media to break news, in offering a discussion forum around mainstream media coverage, and amplifying stories that have appeared in traditional formats. (Dawson 2009). Image: http://seaofstatic.tumblr.com • #balloonboy •“tweetups” I
asked
my
tweeps
if
they
think
that
Twitter
is
a
false
sense
of
community.

I
was
struggling
with
trying
to
understand
this
new
kind
of
space
while
at
the
 same
time
experiencing
major
SEO/snew
Media
exhaustion
(it’s
my
full‐time
job,
my
research
interests,
my
leisure,
everything
I
do).
A
few
of
my
followers
 responded
with
some
interesting
comments
like
@seanpadilla
who
tweeted
[read]
and
@littlebrownjen
who
tweeted
[read].

Twitter
is
certainly
a
different
 kind
of
community;
a
new
one,
in
fact,
where
activists,
professionals,
politicians,
entertainers,
educators,
and
otherwise
still
have
to
negotiate/navigate
 within
this
space
in
order
to
best
disseminate
their
ideas,
products,
services,
and
voices.

The
following
image
illustrates
that
while
Twitter
may
have
 roughly
50
million
users,
most
are
not
very
active,
if
at
all.

But
that
may
be
changing.
It’s
expected
that
Twitter’s
active
users
will
increase
exponentially
 over
the
next
year,
possibly
out‐pacing
it’s
elder
siblings,
Myspace
&
Facebook.
And
as
far
as
trending,
while
the
Twitter
community
may
not
be
as
fully
 active
or
grand
in
size
compared
to
Facebook,
when
Twitter
trends
so
does
the
nation.

A
recent
article
by
business
entrepreneur
Ross
Dawson
analyzed
 Samuel
Degremont’s
research
on
Twitter’s
impact
over
the
news
and
media
cycles.
Dawson
writes,
“Twitter
has
had
one
of
biggest
impacts
on
the
news
 cycle,
firstly
by
often
being
the
first
media
to
break
news,
in
offering
a
discussion
forum
around
mainstream
media
coverage,
and
amplifying
stories
that
 have
appeared
in
traditional
formats.”

Twitter
is
a
community,
a
new
kind
of
micro
community
(compared
to
it’s
virtual
siblings)
that
has
a
profound
 influence
on
how
we
get
our
news
(we
all
pretty
much
know
about
the
#balloonboy
hoax
at
this
point.
Right?
This
story
was
very
much
amplified
via
 Twitter).
Twitter
has
also
changed
how
we
communicate
offline,
like
in
the
case
of
“tweetups”
which
are
offline
get
togethers
arranged
on
Twitter
often
 with
people
who
you
recently
became
acquainted
with.
  6. 6. Tweeting the Personal When Tweeting Gets Personal •Pick your Twitter battles wisely. •Log-off, take a walk, read a book, watch a movie, have sex, eat, get some other work done. Do what you have to do to remove yourself from the contention! •“It’s been real, Tweeps. Gotta go!” •RT @TheJLV: Clarifying gets numbing on Twitter. •Tone can at times get lost in Twitter translation. Image: http://activerain.com/ •Always remember what you’re tweeting for in the first place. Participating
in
Twitter
conversations
is
more
than
a
requirement
for
my
job.

In
between
tweets
about
a
latest
HeatingOil.com,
 YouthNoise.com,
Life
and
Times
of
a
Blogger
post,
or
upcoming
appearance,
I’m
engaging
in
conversations
with
friends,
colleagues,
readers,
 and
customers.

So
at
times,
tweeting
becomes
a
personal
act,
particularly
when
I
engage
in
conversations
about
social
or
political
issues.

As
a
 self‐identified
feminist,
I
have
to
navigate
within
Twitter
society
carefully,
consciously,
and
lovingly.

I
recently
wrote
a
piece
for
Skirt
Magazine
 that
will
be
published
next
month,
entitled
“Can
Snew
Media
Make
‘Feminism’
More
Friendly?”
The
assumption
there
is
that
feminism
isn’t
 friendly,
(which
shouldn’t
matter),
but
with
that
question
I
try
to
unmask
some
dangerously
hidden
assumptions
about
feminism.
The
purpose
 of
the
essay
is
to
argue
that
feminist
ideas
and
advocacy
work
can
be
promulgated
using
snew
media
platforms.
Contentious
issues
like
health
 care,
the
war
in
Afghanistan,
patriarchy,
and
even
Obama’s
Nobel
Peace
Prize
have
all
been
debated
in
Twitter
Society.
If
I’m
promoting
a
 recent
blog
about
gender
identity
in
sports,
I
have
to
acknowledge
that
this
post
will
probably
incite
some
lively
debate
in
Twitter
Society
–
as
 it
did.

And
of
course,
I
welcome
it.

In
the
end,
whether
you’re
a
staunch
feminist
tweeting
about
women’s
right,
a
politician
tweeting
about
 domestic/foreign
policy,
or
a
blogger
tweeting
about
her/his
latest
posting,
we
must
always
remember
what
we’re
tweeting
for.
If
you
find
 yourself
exhausted
or
numbed
by
the
process
of
tweeting
the
personal,
it’s
probably
a
good
time
to
log
off.
  7. 7. Tweeting Professionally Pick your pitches wisely. “Twitter is a marathon . . . Longer than a tweet.” –David Patterson We have to (re)member, as in reorganize and recollect, the art of networking and conversing with people. Twitter makes us better aware of our purpose in the conversation. Images: www.robcubbon.com, www.clipartof.com, www.issnaf.org Like
with
your
battles,
you
must
pick
your
pitches
wisely.

Engage
and
dialogue
with
your
followers,
and
by
all
means,
do
not
advertise
to
 them.

If
you
want
your
followers
to
check
out
your
new
product
or
post
on
your
website,
try
to
include
why
they
should
click
on
your
 shortened
link.

Ask
if
they’d
kindly
retweet.
Don’t
expect
your
followers
to
simply
click
on
where
you
want
them
to
go,
especially
if
you’ve
 never
tweeting
with
them
before.

Even
@iamdiddy
(P.
Diddy)
has
to
give
his
followers
something
to
work
with.
(Incidentally,
Shaquille
O’Neal
 is
probably
one
of
the
most
interesting
Tweeters.
He
actually
has
his
followers
go
on
random
goose
chases,
tweeting
clues
to
his
whereabouts!)

 So
this
is
where
traditional
business/advertising/marketing
sense
sorta
goes
out
the
window.

We’ve
been
taught
that
the
best
way
to
advertise
 is
to
control
the
conversation,
but
with
the
advent
of
snew
media,
particularly
Twitter,
we
can’t
necessarily
only
control
the
conversation,
so
we
 must
also
engage
in
a
conversation
and
learn
how
to
manage
it
through
dialogue
–
enabling
our
followers
to
be
apart
of
what
we’re
promoting,
 not
simply
consumers
of
it.
Politicians,
non‐profits,
and
entrepreneurs
are
learning
how
to
(re)member,
as
in
reorganize
and
recollect,
the
art
 of
networking
and
conversing
with
people.
It’s
basic
communication
at
its
finest.

It
isn’t
simply
about
telling
people
what
you
want
them
to
 know,
but
showing,
explaining,
encouraging,
and
engaging
in
a
conversation
in
140
characters
at
a
time
(while
avoiding
Twitter
Jail
in
the
 process).

 While
Twitter
certainly
has
its
drawbacks
when
it
comes
to
communicating
with
people,
one
thing
Twitter
is
great
for
professionally
and
 personally
(and
perhaps
where
all
the
other
social
networks
fail),
is
it
makes
us
better
aware
of
our
purpose
in
the
conversation.

And
for
 activists,
politicians,
advocates,
educators,
non‐profits,
this
idea
of
finding
purpose
in
a
conversation
taking
place
with
over
50
million
people
 worldwide
is
quite
profound.

The
brilliance
of
Twitter
is
that
140
characters
at
a
time
forces
you
to
want
to
engage
in
longer,
broader
 conversations
happening
within
your
stream
and
on
other
streams.
Devising
a
tweet
to
become
part
of
the
conversation
is
like
waiting
for
the
 right
moment
to
jump
inside
a
double
Dutch
rope;
you
instantly
become
aware
that
what
you
say
in
140
characters
must
be
meaningful
to
 those
that
chose
to
follow
you.

You
realize
that
if
you
can’t
add
much
to
the
conversation,
you
become
a
passive
observer,
potentially
losing
 out
on
customers,
readers,
followers,
and
networks.
  8. 8. Let’s Converse! Twitter.com/taralconley (@taralconley) The Life and Times of a Blogger (www.taralconley.wordpress.com) Youtube.com/friday025 Huffington Post (www.huffingtonpost.com/tara-l-conley) Myspace.com/tarasmusicspace Facebook.com/taralconley LinkedIn (www.linkedin.com/in/taralconley) YouthNoise.com/playcity HeatingOil.com And
with
that,
I’ll
end
by
saying
let’s
converse!
Please
feel
free
to
keep
in
touch
with
me
on
Twitter,
Life
&
Times,
YouTube,
The
Huffington
 Post,
Myspace,
Facebook,
LinkedIn,
YouthNoise,
or
HeatingOil.com.

Thanks
so
much!
  9. 9. Cite/Site References •“Twitter’s Impact on th News & Media Cycle” by Ross Dawson •http://rossdawsonblog.com/weblog/archives/2009/08/twitters_impact.html •“Tweet, Tweet, Ka-Ching: Twitter is Changing the Way Non-profits Make the Ask” by Lydia Dishman •http://www.fastcompany.com/blog/lydia-dishman/all-your-business/tweet-tweet- ch-ching-twitter-changing-way-nonprofits-make-ask-0 •“Tweeting the Electorate” by Kate Paul and Daniel Stone (Newsweek) •http://www.newsweek.com/id/214901 •“10 Ways Twitter Will Change American Business” by Douglas A. McIntyre (Time) •http://www.time.com/time/nation/article/0,8599,1901772,00.html •“Social Pulpit: Barack Obama’s Social Media Toolkit” (Slideshow) •http://www.slideshare.net/montelutz/social-pulpit-barack-obamas-social-media- toolkit •“Twitter is a Marathon . . . Longer Than A Tweet” by David Patterson •http://activerain.com/blogsview/1167420/twitter-is-a-marathon-longer-than-a-tweet •“7 Amazing Twitter Visualizations” 10,000 Words Blog •http://www.10000words.net/2009/09/7-amazing-twitter-visualizations.html •Danah Boyd Publications on Social Networking •http://www.danah.org/papers/

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