Conceptual design floresmcdaniel

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  • Great job!

    I like the use of facebook to persuade people, particularly because it is a service tht people are so familiar with.
    I also like the idea of just in-time messaging, that will trigger the use of sunscreen.
    I wish the user was more well-scoped, it's too broad - focus focus focus - as BJ would say.
    I also wish that the idea was somewhat dynamic, so that the messages don't get old - you know how post-its lose value after you've seen it too many times.
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  • Very good work to this point! The idea comes across very well in this format, and you show awareness of the potential weaknesses. Also, nice attention to details in the slides and the idea overall.

    As you know, I have doubts about how well Facebook can motivate health behavior. But I'm very interested in the approach you describe. My advice is to try this quickly and see what happens. You probably will have to iterate to get a solution that works (perhaps it's not Groups but a Fan Page -- or perhaps changing the FB image). Frankly, no one knows if this concept will work. So try it and let's see . . .
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Conceptual design floresmcdaniel

  1. 1. Face Screen A conceptual design by Tanya Flores and Keith McDaniel Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Design Challenge To design a facebook group that will promote habitual facial sunscreen application
  2. 2. Face Screen <ul><li>Persuasive Purpose </li></ul><ul><ul><li>To promote habitual facial sunscreen application through facebook messaging and by encouraging integrated social triggering. </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu <ul><li>Industrial Design </li></ul>
  3. 3. User Description <ul><ul><li>Current graduate students who understand the consequences of sun exposure but lack the needed trigger to habitually apply sunscreen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Age 25-35 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Avid facebook users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Regular morning </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>hygiene habits </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  4. 4. Kevin in the morning… Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Later during his day, Kevin logs back onto facebook and finds that other friends have commented on his morning post. He feels even more motivated by the fact that he is not the only one struggling with the sun. Kevin left his house this morning without putting on sunscreen. By the end of lunch time Kevin was already sunburned. That night Kevin goes online and joins the Face Screen facebook group. The next morning Kevin wakes up and logs onto facebook. He finds a message that gives him some information that he can share with other friends regarding sun exposure. Every morning after that Kevin continues to receive facebook messages that continue to motivate and encourage the application of his sunscreen. Feeling motivated by the message Kevin applies the sunscreen during his morning rituals. Then wanting the world to know, Kevin reposts the message to his facebook wall.
  5. 5. Prototype of Face Screen <ul><ul><li>A user receives a message from Face Screen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The user is encouraged to repost the message on their own wall </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  6. 6. Features/Functionality <ul><ul><li>Users volunteer to accept facebook messages from Face Screen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Messages will be sent to each user based on the anticipated time of morning grooming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Messages include important factual information regarding sun exposure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Messages are also tailored to the user based on facebook history </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  7. 7. Theoretical Justifications <ul><ul><li>Triggers – just in time messaging </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Familiar technology – target users are avid facebook users </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Social acceptance – friends are encouraged to comment on messages </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Ability – messages are sent during similar activity (i.e. morning grooming) </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  8. 8. Proposed User Testing <ul><ul><ul><li>Invite 5 users to Face Screen </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Quantitative Evaluation: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Number of reposts </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Number of comments </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Days of sunscreen application (user input) </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Time spent on Face Screen </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Qualitative Evaluation: </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>General attitudes about sunscreen prior to joining Face Screen </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>General attitudes about sunscreen after joining Face Screen </li></ul></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Other friends’ attitudes regarding sunscreen </li></ul></ul></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  9. 9. Shortcomings of Design <ul><ul><li>Users may not check their facebook before their morning grooming </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Users may not feel encouraged to repost </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Message information may not be motivating enough for user to change behavior </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Messages may be ignored </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  10. 10. Expansion - What else is possible? <ul><ul><li>Other form factors or ID possibilities </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Facebook app </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Text messaging </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Twitter and o ther social networking sites </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Email notifications </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other features and interactions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Badges / Rewards </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Chain messaging (i.e. users message other users) </li></ul></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  11. 11. Next Steps in Design Process <ul><ul><li>Rapid prototype of Face Screen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>(facebook application) </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User test on a Stanford freshmen dormitory </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Incorporate feedback from user tests </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Build more formal trigger system (increase motivation and overcome other shortcomings) </li></ul></ul>Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu
  12. 12. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation of Design Project How well does the idea reflect concepts from class? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does the design match the design brief? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How viable/convincing is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  13. 13. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Evaluation continued… How well could this solution scale to reach many? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 How well does this document communicate? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 Bonus Points How insightful is the proposed solution? 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7
  14. 14. Stanford University, Spring 2010 CS377v - Creating Health Habits habits.stanford.edu Additional Comments: Overall remarks or additional comments here

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