OCT 11, 2012Gillian Poe, executive director
OC Food Access   Mission:Create access to healthy, localfood options for OC’s mostnutritionally vulnerable residents.
OC Food AccessHealthy Food Access COORDINATE      regional action RESEARCH    fill gaps EDUCATE    public and policy ma...
Hunger In OC CommunityFood Assessment Prevalence   – OC, CPS FSS Consequence    – Nutritional (NHANES) Gaps   – Underst...
Food Security & HungerFood Security: Having reliable access to safe, nutritious food and not living in hunger.Food Insecur...
Defining Food SecurityUSDA Classifications:    Full – no food access challenges   Marginal – experience anxiety over      ...
Food Security Orange County  Profile                      4%          11%                  7%                      Full   ...
Other Measures…                           Orange County                           is ranked 2nd in                        ...
Marginal Food Security Sometimes            Enough of not enough          the kinds of   to eat               foods     9%...
Vitamin A (mcg)            Vitamin E (mg)Immune function             Immune functionVision                      Vitamin K ...
Vitamin A (mcg)   750   700   650   600                                                       Ages 16 to 18   550         ...
Vitamin E (mg)  16.00  14.00  12.00                                                                  Ages 16 to 18  10.00 ...
Fiber (g)  30.00  25.00                                                  Ages 16 to 18                                    ...
Far Too Much…  Carbohydrates                     Sugars                   SaltInsidious weight gain       Insulin Insensit...
Hunger in OC looks like…   You & Me   Cuisine Of Poverty   Malnutrition   Obesity / Diabetes
Social Consequences   Loss of Economic Productivity   High Healthcare Costs   Compromised Mental Health   Poor Academi...
OC Hunger Coalition   Emergency Food Providers   Quarterly Meetings   Network/Learn/Share Resources   First Meeting: J...
Thank you.Visit us: www.ocfoodaccess.org
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Orange County Food Access Coalition

1,039 views

Published on

Food Access Coalition Presentation by Gillian Poe, Executive Director

0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,039
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
193
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • It’s an honor to be with you this morning. The OC Food Access Coalition is somewhat a new and diversified version of the old OC Hunger Coalition, with Helen Andersen that existed in the 90’s. We’re picking up that hunger advocacy piece and adding to it.
  • Our mission is to create access to healthy, local food options for Orange County’s more nutritionally vulnerable residents. We do that by coordinating a host of community partners from the hunger and community health space that together identify gaps in the food system that prohibit healthy food access, and together we develop innovative sustainable local solutions.
  • To give you a sense of what we are doing to achieve our broad mission we: coordinate regional action around hunger and food security,(2) identify gaps in information or infrastructure that prevent us from understanding local food security issues and addressing them. - conduct necessary research to fill gaps in available information(3) educate policy makers and the public about the food system and the changes that need to be made(4) Identify opportunities for collaboration amongst partners to fill the gaps and provide innovative solutions to hunger. This morning I’ll be drawing from our research efforts with Professor Sara Johnson and her students from CalState Fullerton to present to you an overview of hunger or, as we refer to it, food insecurity, in our community.
  • This morning I’ll be drawing from our research efforts with Professor Sara Johnson and her students from CalState Fullerton to present to you an overview of hunger or, as we refer to it, food security, in our community. Our research effort is focusing on the Prevalence and Consequences of food insecurity on our community. Ultimately want to help fill gaps in the information that we rely on to understand the issue of hunger amongst multiple demographics. Data has come from theCurrent Population Survey – Food Security Supplement from 2009 and the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey from 2010 (2007-08 data)..
  • I recognize through my conversations that “Food Security” is not a commonly recognized term:The trend in the language around hunger is shifting and now we’re now referencing to hunger in terms of levels of food security. A person is deemed “food secure” when they have access to safe, nutritious food and do not live in a state of hunger. “Food Insecurity” then, refers to not having enough food to meet ones needs, but it also refers to not being able to get access to the types of food one needs to thrive.
  • The USDA classifies hunger and those experiencing hunger or the threat of hunger in 4 categories that are relevant to the information I’ll provide next.
  • If we look at the Orange County Food Security Profile from the USDA 2010 Data– we see the following:78% Full food security 11% Marginal food security7% Low4% Very Low = 22% Food insecure to some degree = about 500,000 residents So The Marginally Food insecure comprise the largest portion of our food insecure residents. Which correlates with the fact that on the whole, our food assistance programs are offering supplemental food assistance, and less emergency food – on the whole. But regarding the figures, our emergency food providers suggest the numbers are much higher…
  • Those working on the ground, interfacing with clients and providing emergency food assistance will tell you the numbers are quite a bit higher and the need is far greater…Food Bank DemandCA Ranking amongst 48 counties CalFresh enrollment since Jan 2012 And, Overweight/Obesity trends
  • The largestpopulation of those in need is marginally food secure (11%), which may suggest we’re not doing too badly – with the classification being the threat of hunger, not actually hunger – but we find that when questions were asked about this cohorts ability to meet their food needs, we see a more troubling story – 64% were able to get enough food to eat but not always the kinds of food they would like. 9% experienced that they were sometimes not able to get enough food. Additionally, we find that the marginal food secure group actually has a nutritional experience that is worse than or equal to the very low food security groups. We saw this in 4 main vitamin and nutrient categories.
  • Vit A, Vit E, Calcium and Fibler
  • Marginal Food Secure – for four specific measure, we found the nutritional intake of certain cohorts to be the same or worse than those reporting very low or low food security.
  • So what does hunger look like in our community?
  • The social costs of hunger/malnutrition also include:
  • The social costs of hunger/malnutrition also include:
  • Orange County Food Access Coalition

    1. 1. OCT 11, 2012Gillian Poe, executive director
    2. 2. OC Food Access Mission:Create access to healthy, localfood options for OC’s mostnutritionally vulnerable residents.
    3. 3. OC Food AccessHealthy Food Access COORDINATE regional action RESEARCH fill gaps EDUCATE public and policy makers IDENTIFY opportunities for collaboration
    4. 4. Hunger In OC CommunityFood Assessment Prevalence – OC, CPS FSS Consequence – Nutritional (NHANES) Gaps – Understand the differences
    5. 5. Food Security & HungerFood Security: Having reliable access to safe, nutritious food and not living in hunger.Food Insecurity: Not having enough food; Not having access to the types of food
    6. 6. Defining Food SecurityUSDA Classifications: Full – no food access challenges Marginal – experience anxiety over food sufficiency Low – reduced quality, variety or desirability Very Low – reduced food intake and disruption to diet
    7. 7. Food Security Orange County Profile 4% 11% 7% Full Marginal 78% Low Very Low2010 Adult Population = 2,257,674
    8. 8. Other Measures… Orange County is ranked 2nd in California for 650,000+residents rely food insecurity amongst adults. on the food banks - 2009 California Health Interview OC Ranked 2nd in CA Survey 30% of children for food insecurity and 54% of adults in Orange Enrollment in CalFresh County are overweight or up 1,355/month obese. – 2011 Orange County Community Indicators Report
    9. 9. Marginal Food Security Sometimes Enough of not enough the kinds of to eat foods 9% 27% Enough but Often not not always enough to the kinds of eat food 0% 64%
    10. 10. Vitamin A (mcg) Vitamin E (mg)Immune function Immune functionVision Vitamin K efficiencyGene transcription & Skin AntioxidantRed blood cell Cell membrane regulation production Calcium (mg) Fiber (g)Bone health Regulate digestionDental health May benefit diabetics Reduce risk against some cancers Where Everyone Falls Short
    11. 11. Vitamin A (mcg) 750 700 650 600 Ages 16 to 18 550 Ages 19 to 49* Ages 50 to 80* 500 Recommended 450 400 Full Food Marginal Low Food Very Low Security Food Security Food Security Security
    12. 12. Vitamin E (mg) 16.00 14.00 12.00 Ages 16 to 18 10.00 Ages 19 to 49* Ages 50 to 80* 8.00 Recommended 6.00 4.00 Full Food Marginal Food Low Food Very Low Security Security Security Food Security
    13. 13. Fiber (g) 30.00 25.00 Ages 16 to 18 Ages 19 to 49 20.00 Ages 50 to 80* Recommended (50-80) 15.00 Recommended (19-49) Recommended (16-18) 10.00 Full Food Marginal Low Food Very Low Security Food Security Food Security Security
    14. 14. Far Too Much… Carbohydrates Sugars SaltInsidious weight gain Insulin Insensitivity Increased serumInsulin Insensitivity Temporary satiety cholesterolIncreased serum triglycerides Type II Diabetes & Obesity Cardiovascular Disease Thyroid & Endocrine Problems
    15. 15. Hunger in OC looks like… You & Me Cuisine Of Poverty Malnutrition Obesity / Diabetes
    16. 16. Social Consequences Loss of Economic Productivity High Healthcare Costs Compromised Mental Health Poor Academic Performance
    17. 17. OC Hunger Coalition Emergency Food Providers Quarterly Meetings Network/Learn/Share Resources First Meeting: January 8th SIGN UP for MORE INFO!
    18. 18. Thank you.Visit us: www.ocfoodaccess.org

    ×