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Training on Representation Skills <ul><li>Tamsin Rose </li></ul><ul><li>August 2009 </li></ul>
What does representation mean? Representation can take many forms: - re presenting yourself  - representing a team or work...
Consulting, reporting back and accountability  <ul><li>Consulting well </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify the mandate – who/what do...
Exercises to hone your skills <ul><li>Elevator pitch  – 60 seconds of attention of a senior policymaker. What would you sa...
Some tips on nerves when speaking <ul><li>Drink lots of water, but 'sip' in the 30 mins before the presentation </li></ul>...
When you are a guest speaker <ul><li>Remember, it is about them not you. Think about why would your audience want to liste...
Layering your presentation <ul><li>- Structure carefully with a beginning, middle and end </li></ul><ul><li>- Re-frame the...
Choose your image carefully <ul><li>Layers of meaning – What do you see?Do you all see the same thing?  </li></ul><ul><li>...
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Representing and speaking with authority

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Material from a training for NGOs on representation, public speaking and communication

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Representing and speaking with authority

  1. 1. Training on Representation Skills <ul><li>Tamsin Rose </li></ul><ul><li>August 2009 </li></ul>
  2. 2. What does representation mean? Representation can take many forms: - re presenting yourself - representing a team or workgroup - representing an organisation - representing a community - representing a constituency What is the difference between speaking in a personal capacity, speaking on behalf of someone or being a spokesperson?
  3. 3. Consulting, reporting back and accountability <ul><li>Consulting well </li></ul><ul><li>Clarify the mandate – who/what do your represent ? </li></ul><ul><li>What is your role, why are you the right person to speak ? </li></ul><ul><li>How have you consulted the constituency adequately? </li></ul><ul><li>Have all voices and views had a chance to be expressed? </li></ul><ul><li>Have clear messages emerged? </li></ul><ul><li>How have conflicts been adequately addressed? </li></ul><ul><li>Reporting and accountability </li></ul><ul><li>Report back promptly and accurately </li></ul><ul><li>Identify next steps and opportunities </li></ul><ul><li>Discuss representation options for future events </li></ul>
  4. 4. Exercises to hone your skills <ul><li>Elevator pitch – 60 seconds of attention of a senior policymaker. What would you say? </li></ul><ul><li>Cocktail party – Start with a random subject and within 60 seconds bring the conversation round to EPHA or a policy issue </li></ul>
  5. 5. Some tips on nerves when speaking <ul><li>Drink lots of water, but 'sip' in the 30 mins before the presentation </li></ul><ul><li>Choose some faces in the audience to focus on, make eye contact </li></ul><ul><li>Take a deep breath and smile before you start, it relaxes the facial muscles </li></ul><ul><li>It is not 'you' on stage, you are channelling the organisation. Speak from the position of its reputation, gravitas, strength and political importance </li></ul>
  6. 6. When you are a guest speaker <ul><li>Remember, it is about them not you. Think about why would your audience want to listen to you. Find out as much as you can about the audience and their expectations: </li></ul><ul><li>- focus of the event </li></ul><ul><li>- how many participants </li></ul><ul><li>- what is important to them and motivates them </li></ul><ul><li>- level of prior knowledge </li></ul><ul><li>- who else is on the agenda </li></ul><ul><li>- timing and scheduling </li></ul><ul><li>- technical and language issues </li></ul><ul><li>- will you be introduced by the chair, speak from a podium </li></ul>
  7. 7. Layering your presentation <ul><li>- Structure carefully with a beginning, middle and end </li></ul><ul><li>- Re-frame the issue to the way you want the audience to see it </li></ul><ul><li>- Headlines not in-depth information </li></ul><ul><li>- Fewer words, more pictures and visuals </li></ul><ul><li>- Avoid jargon, acronyms, use conversational language </li></ul><ul><li>- Adapt the style and messages to the audience </li></ul><ul><li>- Use facts in interesting ways </li></ul><ul><li>- Tell stories to illustrate your points </li></ul><ul><li>- Capture the attention early on, then keep it </li></ul><ul><li>- Use pauses, vary the tone, pitch and rhythm of voice </li></ul><ul><li>- Match your body language with the spoken tone + words </li></ul>
  8. 8. Choose your image carefully <ul><li>Layers of meaning – What do you see?Do you all see the same thing? </li></ul><ul><li>Does this mean the same thing to all participants? </li></ul><ul><li>Does it make you feel hungry or nauseous? </li></ul>

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