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Master Class on EU funding for EPHA members Tamsin Rose October 2009
Features of EU programmes (1) <ul><li>EU funds support projects which are  concrete, time-limited actions that  contribute...
Think twice about applying <ul><ul><li>EC priorities usually don’t match yours and change often </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li...
Questions to ask yourself <ul><ul><li>Does programme respond to my priorities? Does it give me the possibility to address ...
Features of EU programmes (2) <ul><li>Almost all  projects require co-financing . This can be as little as 20 % but more c...
Reminder: a project… Responds to priorities of funder Limited set of actions Concrete results Short time-frame Delivered i...
Reminder: a tender… Responds exactly to requirements of funder Limited set of actions Funder defines the expected results ...
Sample SANCO project cycle Summer: Commission gathers ideas for Annual work programme Autumn: Programme committee reviews ...
Building the project (1) <ul><li>What is the  problem  we want to address?  </li></ul><ul><li>Why is this a  European prob...
Building the project (2) <ul><li>What are the  expected results  of the project ? (e.g how would things be changed afterwa...
What is the problem? Key  problem  to address: conduct problem analysis with accuracy to tackle  causes and effects   Find...
Sample project logic Overall objective :  to provide the trained workforce required for the next phase of the development ...
Project development tools allow vertical logic to flow in  both  directions <ul><li>Start by using the  HOW  logic flow, b...
Outputs/Targets/Results:  the services/benefits  to be produced  by the project <ul><li>Specify the benefits the target gr...
Indicators are to  measure achievements  and outputs of your project <ul><ul><li>Indicators should be quantitative and qua...
Assess your  risks  and   verify your  assumptions <ul><ul><li>Risks: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Analysis of factors w...
Policy and context Contribution to Public Health Programme and the annual workplan – note the specific priorities of the f...
Technical quality <ul><li>Evidence base: problem analysis, impact and effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Content: aims and ob...
Management quality The organisation applying for funding must: —  guarantee an appropriate governing structure, management...
SANCO evaluation grid <ul><li>Policy and contextual relevance of the project /40  </li></ul><ul><li>Technical quality of t...
Invest in your homework <ul><li>Read the annual workplan and multi-annual programme </li></ul><ul><li>What are the key pri...
Scoring used by DG Research 0:   The proposal fails to address the criterion under examination or cannot be judged due to ...
Use a fresh pair of eyes <ul><li>Read the guidelines once more </li></ul><ul><li>Revise your project and check whether: </...
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Masterclass on project building

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Materials from a training for NGOs about how to develop high quality project proposals for EU funding.

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Masterclass on project building

  1. 1. Master Class on EU funding for EPHA members Tamsin Rose October 2009
  2. 2. Features of EU programmes (1) <ul><li>EU funds support projects which are concrete, time-limited actions that contribute towards a permanent result or change. </li></ul><ul><li>EU programmes are multi-annual programmes with annual calls for proposals. Calls for proposals are open for a short time only (typically 12 weeks). You need to work fast, so good preparation is essential. </li></ul><ul><li>The EU funds project that show 'added-value' at European level , eg how the project contributes to the overall political objectives of the EU and why this needs a European approach rather than national or international action. </li></ul>
  3. 3. Think twice about applying <ul><ul><li>EC priorities usually don’t match yours and change often </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The project cycle from submission to implementation can be very lengthy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Co-financing may be difficult to secure </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The EU sometimes pays very late, which may harm your cash flow </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Projects are costly to develop, few are funded. The application process is never paid for by the project </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>EU projects have strict administrative requirements </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Projects improve your profile and increase your visibility </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They allow you to acquire and develop knowledge and expertise </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They integrate you into professional and academic networks </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They improve the focus and professionalism of your organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They are a powerful tool to address concrete problems </li></ul></ul>
  4. 4. Questions to ask yourself <ul><ul><li>Does programme respond to my priorities? Does it give me the possibility to address the identified problem? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Does this fit in with my strategic goals? </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Do I have the capacity to prepare a proposal? A good proposal is more than one that gets funded. A poorly conceived proposal is difficult to manage </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Will I have the capacity to implement the project? Remember that poor projects leave a negative reputation for the organisation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Can I find the right partners? Who else might apply? </li></ul></ul>
  5. 5. Features of EU programmes (2) <ul><li>Almost all projects require co-financing . This can be as little as 20 % but more commonly 50% or more. Proof of adequate co-financing is required at the moment of project submission rather than at the contracting stage. </li></ul><ul><li>The EU seeks to achieve a balanced geographic coverage . </li></ul><ul><li>Applications often require organisations to cooperate in consortia . </li></ul><ul><li>EU projects have strict monitoring and evaluation procedures. </li></ul><ul><li>Success rate in general calls for proposals can be low . 1 in 5 to 1 in 15 projects. Success rates may be higher for targeted calls for proposals. </li></ul>
  6. 6. Reminder: a project… Responds to priorities of funder Limited set of actions Concrete results Short time-frame Delivered in partnership Pan-European in nature Co-financing of activities Co-ownership of results
  7. 7. Reminder: a tender… Responds exactly to requirements of funder Limited set of actions Funder defines the expected results Contractor proposes a methodology Can generate a profit Deliverables carry the funder's logo/brand Funder owns the results
  8. 8. Sample SANCO project cycle Summer: Commission gathers ideas for Annual work programme Autumn: Programme committee reviews and approves Annual work programme February: Publication of the call for projects May: Deadline for submission June-July: Evaluation process July: Programme Committee decision on funding August: Results of evaluation Sept – Nov: Negotiation and signature of contracts January: Start of new projects
  9. 9. Building the project (1) <ul><li>What is the problem we want to address? </li></ul><ul><li>Why is this a European problem rather than national/local problem? </li></ul><ul><li>How does this relate to the Commission's work programme (link to their priorities/themes) </li></ul><ul><li>What is our overall objective to achieve on this problem? (e.g medium to long-term) </li></ul><ul><li>What is our specific objective with this project (e.g a concrete, defined step towards achieving the medium term objective) </li></ul>
  10. 10. Building the project (2) <ul><li>What are the expected results of the project ? (e.g how would things be changed afterwards) </li></ul><ul><li>What do we want to do ? (set of activities that would deliver the expected results and achieve the objective) </li></ul><ul><li>Why are we uniquely the right people to lead this? (understanding, expertise, network, knowledge, track record etc) </li></ul><ul><li>Who else would add value to the project? (institutions, individuals who could be partners) </li></ul><ul><li>What are the potential sources of co-funding that could be used for the project? </li></ul>
  11. 11. What is the problem? Key problem to address: conduct problem analysis with accuracy to tackle causes and effects Finding “the roots of the evil”: - What is the problem to be solved? - Where does it start? - Focus on one problem only! - Find its causes and effects - The project activities “tackle” the causes of the problem in order to solve the problem in a sustainable way
  12. 12. Sample project logic Overall objective : to provide the trained workforce required for the next phase of the development plan. Project objective : x number of people with y skills should find suitable employment after training Results : Successful training leading to employment Activities : develop training course, test course, publicise it, pilot phase of students Outputs: a well functioning institute and a flow of well-trained people Inputs : personnel, trainers and training material
  13. 13. Project development tools allow vertical logic to flow in both directions <ul><li>Start by using the HOW logic flow, by planning downwards. </li></ul><ul><li>Overall goal </li></ul><ul><li>Project goal </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Outputs </li></ul><ul><li>Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Inputs </li></ul><ul><li>Check the process by using the WHY logic flow, by thinking upwards. </li></ul><ul><li>Overall goal </li></ul><ul><li>Project goal </li></ul><ul><li>Results </li></ul><ul><li>Outputs </li></ul><ul><li>Activities </li></ul><ul><li>Inputs </li></ul>
  14. 14. Outputs/Targets/Results: the services/benefits to be produced by the project <ul><li>Specify the benefits the target group will receive from the project </li></ul><ul><li>What services do the beneficiary get access to after the project activities? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the benefit they can enjoy? </li></ul><ul><li>They are connected to the cause of the identified problem. This sets out the services which the beneficiaries will receive from the implementing agency through the project in order to reach the planned objectives. </li></ul><ul><li>Examples: </li></ul><ul><li>Farmers able to apply more efficient maize production techniques </li></ul><ul><li>Adequate mother and child care provided to the people in region X </li></ul><ul><li>Time frame: now </li></ul>
  15. 15. Indicators are to measure achievements and outputs of your project <ul><ul><li>Indicators should be quantitative and qualitative </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>They should answer the questions: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>For whom? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>When? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Where? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>How much? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>What quality? </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>The process of setting up indicators shows if the objectives are vague </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Objectively Verifiable Indicators (OVI) and outputs mean extra points in the evaluation </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Source of Verification (SoV): sometimes the EU asks where is possible to verify that the measurements you selected. They can be statistics, report, external/internal analysis, etc. </li></ul></ul>
  16. 16. Assess your risks and verify your assumptions <ul><ul><li>Risks: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Analysis of factors which may influence the implementation of the project and hamper the achievement of objectives </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>Try understand internal and external risk factors </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>If necessary, plan a counteraction strategy </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Assumptions: </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>They describe situations and pre-conditions necessary for the project success but largely beyond the control of the project management </li></ul></ul></ul><ul><ul><ul><li>It is important to identify assumptions on each level of objective </li></ul></ul></ul>
  17. 17. Policy and context Contribution to Public Health Programme and the annual workplan – note the specific priorities of the funding call Strategic relevance to existing knowledge and implications for health European added value - Impact on target groups and long-term multiplier effect - Complementarity/synergy with other EU policies and programmes Geographic coverage Adequacy of project with social/political/cultural context
  18. 18. Technical quality <ul><li>Evidence base: problem analysis, impact and effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Content: aims and objectives, target groups including relevant geographical factors, methods, anticipated effects and outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Innovative nature: towards state of art without duplication or overlap </li></ul><ul><li>Clear and realistic work programme with description of the activities planned, tasks and responsibilities and timetables, including communication and dissemination strategy </li></ul><ul><li>Evaluation strategy (internal and external) with objectively verifiable indicators </li></ul><ul><li>Cost-effective and balanced budget </li></ul>
  19. 19. Management quality The organisation applying for funding must: — guarantee an appropriate governing structure, management processes, human and financial resources and administration, and good working relationships with relevant partners and stakeholders, — be able to demonstrate the level of achievement of its organisational objectives and its capacity to achieve result.
  20. 20. SANCO evaluation grid <ul><li>Policy and contextual relevance of the project /40 </li></ul><ul><li>Technical quality of the project /30 </li></ul><ul><li>Management quality of the project and budget /30 </li></ul><ul><li>Maximum total score /100 </li></ul>
  21. 21. Invest in your homework <ul><li>Read the annual workplan and multi-annual programme </li></ul><ul><li>What are the key priorities for funding this year? </li></ul><ul><li>How would your topic fit into the priorities? </li></ul><ul><li>Are you or your partners eligible for funding ? (legal structure, country of registration) </li></ul><ul><li>Read the list of previously funded projects – what can that tell you about what type of projects, size of projects, types of partners are successful? </li></ul><ul><li>Attend the Open Day – but be prepared with the questions that you want to ask </li></ul><ul><li>Look for opportunities to find partners </li></ul><ul><li>Contact national focal points (link to programme committee) </li></ul>
  22. 22. Scoring used by DG Research 0: The proposal fails to address the criterion under examination or cannot be judged due to missing or incomplete information 1: Poor. The criterion is addressed in an adequate manner, or there are serious inherent weaknesses. 2: Fair. While the proposal broadly addresses the criterion, there are significant weaknesses. 3: Good. The proposal addresses the criterion well, although improvements would be necessary. 4: Very good. The proposal addresses the criterion very well, although certain improvements are still possible. 5: Excellent. The proposal successfully addresses all relevant aspects of the criterion in question. Any shortcomings are minor.
  23. 23. Use a fresh pair of eyes <ul><li>Read the guidelines once more </li></ul><ul><li>Revise your project and check whether: </li></ul><ul><li>Your admin and paperwork is correct </li></ul><ul><li>Your objectives match the funder's objectives </li></ul><ul><li>Your activities match the allowed activities </li></ul><ul><li>Your consortium matches the funder's request </li></ul><ul><li>Your people are the right people </li></ul><ul><li>Your budget falls within the prescribed limits </li></ul><ul><li>Your project is sustainable </li></ul>

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