Music, Aggression, and Flash Mobs<br />Tamara Ibezim<br />
Background Literature<br /><ul><li>Spreading Activation (Associative Network Theory), General Aggression Model
 Tropeano (2006) suggests that watching a violent rap music video provokes individuals to provide violent answers to quest...
 Anderson et al. (2003) show that exposure to violent lyrics primes individuals to adopt aggressive thoughts and feelings.
 Wingood et al. (2003) conducted a 2.5 year longitudinal study of lower-socioeconomic-status African American female teens...
H2: Exposure to Christian rap music will increase an individual’s level of aggression.
H3: Exposure to pop music following exposure to violent rap music will attenuate the effects of the violent rap music.
H4: Viewing the music video for a song from the above genres will result in comparatively higher levels of aggression than...
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Music Aggression Ppt

  1. 1. Music, Aggression, and Flash Mobs<br />Tamara Ibezim<br />
  2. 2. Background Literature<br /><ul><li>Spreading Activation (Associative Network Theory), General Aggression Model
  3. 3. Tropeano (2006) suggests that watching a violent rap music video provokes individuals to provide violent answers to questions about fictitious scenarios.
  4. 4. Anderson et al. (2003) show that exposure to violent lyrics primes individuals to adopt aggressive thoughts and feelings.
  5. 5. Wingood et al. (2003) conducted a 2.5 year longitudinal study of lower-socioeconomic-status African American female teens and found that those with the most exposure to rap music were the most likely to engage in violent acts and other unhealthy behaviors.</li></li></ul><li>Hypotheses<br /><ul><li>H1: Exposure to violent rap music will increase an individual’s level of aggression.
  6. 6. H2: Exposure to Christian rap music will increase an individual’s level of aggression.
  7. 7. H3: Exposure to pop music following exposure to violent rap music will attenuate the effects of the violent rap music.
  8. 8. H4: Viewing the music video for a song from the above genres will result in comparatively higher levels of aggression than exposure to just the song alone. </li></li></ul><li>Procedure<br />Pre/Post Test Design<br /> Six test groups: <br />1) Exposure to violent rap (VR), song only<br /> 2) Exposure to Christian rap (CR), song only<br /> 3) Exposure to violent rap followed by pop music (VR+PM), song only<br /> 4) Exposure to violent rap, music video<br /> 5) Exposure to Christian rap, music video<br /> 6) Exposure to violent rap followed by pop music, music video<br />Aggression Scale: Buss & Perry (1992)Verbal aggression (VA), Physical aggression (PA), Anger (A), Hostility (H)<br />
  9. 9. Philadelphia Flash Mobs<br />Some commentators have suggested that the recent flash mobs in Philadelphia have been in part inspired by violent music.<br />
  10. 10. Results<br />No hypotheses supported!<br />ANOVA (3 X 5) Conditions (VR, CR, VR+PM) X Anger LevelsPA:F(2, 107) = .67, p = .516VA:F(2, 107) = .80, p = .451A:F(2, 107) = .52, p = .594H:F(2, 107) = .45, p = .642Flash Mob: F(2, 107) = 2.24, p = .112<br /><ul><li>ANOVA (2 X 5) Conditions (VR, VR+PM) X Anger LevelsPA: F(1, 67) = .84, p = .362VA:F(1, 67) = .81, p = .372A:F(1, 67) = .37, p = .543H: F(1, 67) = .76, p = .386Flash MobF(1, 67) = .01, p = .961</li></li></ul><li>Results (cont.)<br />No hypotheses supported!<br />ANOVA (2 X 5) Exposure (Song, Video) X Anger LevelsPA:F(1, 67) = 2.04, p = .158VA:F(1, 67) = .16, p = .691A:F(1, 67) = 1.01, p = .319H:F(1, 67) = .05, p = .822Flash Mob: F(1, 67) = .01, p = .961<br />
  11. 11. Implications<br />Our lack of significant results is significant in itself. This suggests the following:<br /><ul><li> Desensitization
  12. 12. Mere exposure
  13. 13. Maintenance of self-concept
  14. 14. Open-ended responses indicate aversion to the study itself
  15. 15. Liberal-minded campus</li>

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