Earth science 18.3

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Earth science 18.3

  1. 1. Cloud Types and Precipitation 18.3<br />
  2. 2. Cirrus <br />One of three basic cloud forms; also one of the three high cloud types; they are thin, delicate ice-crystal often appearing as veil-like patches or thin, wispy fibers. <br />
  3. 3. Cumulus <br />One of three basic cloud forms; also the name given to one of the clouds of vertical development; they are billowy individual cloud masses that often have flat bases. <br />
  4. 4. Stratus <br />One of three basic cloud forms; they are sheets or layers that cover much or all of the sky. <br />
  5. 5. Bergeron Process <br />A theory that relates the formation of precipitation to supercooledclouds, freezing nuclei, and the different saturation levels of ice and liquid water.<br />
  6. 6. Supercooled Water<br />The condition of water droplets that remain in the liquid state at temperatures well below O˚C.<br />
  7. 7. Supersaturated Air <br />The condition of air that is more highly concentrated than is normally possible under given temperature and pressure conditions; when describing humidity, it refers to a relative humidity that is greater than 100 percent.<br />
  8. 8. Collision-Coalescence Process <br />A theory of raindrop formation in warm clouds in which large cloud droplets collide and join together to form with smaller droplets to a raindrop; opposite electrical charges may bind the cloud droplets together. <br />
  9. 9. Key Concept<br />Clouds are classified on the basis of their form and height. <br />
  10. 10. Key Concept<br />Fog is defined as a cloud with its base at or very near the ground. <br />
  11. 11. Key Concept<br />For precipitation to form, cloud droplets must grow in volume by roughly one million times. <br />

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