26.1 Introduction to the Animal           Kingdom
Invertebrate• Animal that does not have a backbone, or  vertebral column.
vertebrate• Animal that has a vertebral column, or  backbone
Feedback inhibition• Process in which the product or result stops or  limits the process.
blastula• Hollow ball of cells formed when a zygote  undergoes a series of divisions.
protostome• Animal whose mouth is formed from its  blastopore.
deuterostome• Animal whose anus is formed from the  blastopore of a blastula.
anus• Opening through which wastes leave the  digestive tract.
endoderm• Innermost germ layer of most animals;  develops into the linings of the digestive tract  and much of the respira...
mesoderm• Middle germ layer of most animals; gives rise  to muscles and much of the circulatory,  reproductive, and excret...
ectoderm• Outermost germ layer of most animals; gives  rise to outer layer of the skin, sense organs,  and nerves.
Radial symmetry• Body plan in which body parts repeat around  the center of the body; characteristic of sea  anemones and ...
Bilateral symmetry• Body plan in which only a single, imaginary  line can divide the body into two equal halves;  characte...
cephalization• Concentration of sense organs and nerve cells  at the front of an animal’s body.
Key Concept• Animals, members of the kingdom Animalia,  are multicellular, eukaryotic heterotrophs  whose cells lack cell ...
Key Concept• Animals carry out the following essential  functions: feeding, respiration, circulation,  excretion, response...
Key Concept• Complex animals tend to have high levels of  cell specialization and internal body  organization, bilateral b...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in …5
×

Biology 26.1

1,209 views

Published on

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,209
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
8
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Biology 26.1

  1. 1. 26.1 Introduction to the Animal Kingdom
  2. 2. Invertebrate• Animal that does not have a backbone, or vertebral column.
  3. 3. vertebrate• Animal that has a vertebral column, or backbone
  4. 4. Feedback inhibition• Process in which the product or result stops or limits the process.
  5. 5. blastula• Hollow ball of cells formed when a zygote undergoes a series of divisions.
  6. 6. protostome• Animal whose mouth is formed from its blastopore.
  7. 7. deuterostome• Animal whose anus is formed from the blastopore of a blastula.
  8. 8. anus• Opening through which wastes leave the digestive tract.
  9. 9. endoderm• Innermost germ layer of most animals; develops into the linings of the digestive tract and much of the respiratory system.
  10. 10. mesoderm• Middle germ layer of most animals; gives rise to muscles and much of the circulatory, reproductive, and excretory systems.
  11. 11. ectoderm• Outermost germ layer of most animals; gives rise to outer layer of the skin, sense organs, and nerves.
  12. 12. Radial symmetry• Body plan in which body parts repeat around the center of the body; characteristic of sea anemones and sea stars.
  13. 13. Bilateral symmetry• Body plan in which only a single, imaginary line can divide the body into two equal halves; characteristics of worms, arthropods, and chordates.
  14. 14. cephalization• Concentration of sense organs and nerve cells at the front of an animal’s body.
  15. 15. Key Concept• Animals, members of the kingdom Animalia, are multicellular, eukaryotic heterotrophs whose cells lack cell walls.
  16. 16. Key Concept• Animals carry out the following essential functions: feeding, respiration, circulation, excretion, response, movement, and reproduction.
  17. 17. Key Concept• Complex animals tend to have high levels of cell specialization and internal body organization, bilateral body symmetry, a front end or head with sense organs, and a body cavity.

×