Schiff cb ce_09

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Schiff cb ce_09

  1. 1. Chapter 9The Influence of Culture on Consumer Behaviour Consumer Behaviour Canadian Edition Schiffman/Kanuk/Das Copyright © 2006 Pearson Education Canada Inc.
  2. 2. Opening Vignette Canadians and Minivans Is there a unique Canadian Culture?Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-2
  3. 3. Culture Thesum total of learned beliefs, values, and customs that serve to regulate the consumer behaviour of members of a particular society.Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-3
  4. 4. Key Characteristics of Culture The Impact of culture is hard to identify Culture is dynamic Culture is shared Culture is learned through enculturation and acculturation Culture offers order, direction, and guidance in all phases of human problem solving - e.g. When to eat, Where to eatCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-4
  5. 5. Forms of Cultural Learning Formal Learning Informal Learning Technical LearningCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-5
  6. 6. Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-6
  7. 7. How Culture is Communicated Language and symbols Ritual Sharing of CultureCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-7
  8. 8. Culture and Advertising Is it the role of advertising to socialize readers on how to dress, decorate their homes, choose wines and food for parties, etc? – Vanity Fair – Martha Stewart Living – Wine SpectatorCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-8
  9. 9. Criteria for Value Selection The value must be pervasive. The value must be enduring. The value must be consumer-related.Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-9
  10. 10. Canadian Core Values Achievement and  Individualism success  Freedom Activity  External Efficiency and conformity practicality  Humanitarianism Progress  Youthfulness Material comfort  Fitness and health Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-10
  11. 11. Canadian Versus American Core Values Core values are not a Canadian phenomenon Differences between Canadian and American values stem from differences in founding values, experiences and institutions Are Canadian and American values diverging?Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-11
  12. 12. Comparison of Canadian and American ValuesCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-12
  13. 13. Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-13
  14. 14. Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-14
  15. 15. Comparison of Canadian and American Values – cont’d Canadians are less likely to say that religion is important to them There are more agnostics, atheists and secular humanists in Canada than in the US Canadians value the influence of immigrants more than Americans Canadians are more ‘liberal’ in their values at every age than AmericansCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-15
  16. 16. The Measurement of Culture ContentAnalysis Consumer Fieldwork Value Measurement InstrumentsCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-16
  17. 17. Content AnalysisA method for systematically analyzing the content of verbal and/or pictorial communication. Frequently used to determine prevailing social values of a society.Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-17
  18. 18. Field ObservationA measurement technique that takes place within a natural environment that focuses on observing behaviour (sometimes without the subjects’ awareness).Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-18
  19. 19. Field Observation Takes place within a natural environment Performed sometimes without the subject’s awareness Focuses on observation of behaviourCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-19
  20. 20. Participant-Observers Researchers who participate in the environment that they are studying without notifying those who are being observedCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-20
  21. 21. Value Measurement Survey Instruments Rokeach Value Survey (RVS) – A self-administered inventory consisting of eighteen “terminal” values (i.e., personal goals) and eighteen “instrumental” values (i.e., ways of reaching personal goals). List of Values (LOV) – A value measurement instrument that asks consumers to identify their two most important values from a nine-value list that is based on the terminal values of the Rokeach Value SurveyCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-21
  22. 22. (continued)Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-22
  23. 23. Figure 9-8 (continued)Copyright © 2006 Pearson 9-23
  24. 24. Culture and Marketing Strategy Identify key cultural values that affect the consumption of the product Ensure the marketing mix appeals to these values Examine changes in cultural values and adapt the marketing mix if needed Modify marketing mix to subcultures if the culture is heterogeneous Be aware of symbols and ritualCopyright © 2006 Pearson 9-24

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