2012 March Luncheon: Education Summit

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March 16, 2012 Technology Alliance Group (TAG) for Northwest Washington panel presentation by Jeff Wright (WWU), Dean of the College of Sciences & Technology; Janice Walker (WCC) , Workforce Education Coordinator; and Sharon Carpenter (BTC), Dean of Professional Technical Education.

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2012 March Luncheon: Education Summit

  1. 1. Welcome to TAG’s March Luncheon Education Summit March 16, 2012– Jeff Wright (WWU) Dean of the College of Sciences & Technology– Janice Walker (WCC) Workforce Education Coordinator– Sharon Carpenter (BTC) Dean of Professional Technical Education
  2. 2. TAG Education Summit: The Context for STEM Education Jeff Wright, Dean College of Sciences and Technology Western Washington UniversityMarch 16, 2012 TAG Education Summit
  3. 3. 2011 What’s today’s iPad 2 equivalent?<<$1,000
  4. 4. Single Purpose Commercial Stages of Mainframe Computational Mini Functionality Workstation and Personal Productivity1:106 Micros/PC Laptop PDA 1:10 3 Cell PhonesNumbers of Smart phones 1:1 Computers & tablets Motes (COMPUTERS : PERSON) 103:1
  5. 5. February 2003February 2002 August 2003 February 2004
  6. 6. Today’s technical workforcechallenge is twofold:1. Sustaining the return on our technical investment3. Keeping ahead of rapidly accelerating technological change Refs: Center for Energy Workforce Development ASCE Report on Aging Infrastructure
  7. 7. Example: Moving to energy self-sufficiency Sustaining our present investment •U.S. homes use 21% more energy than 1980 •U.S. population will grow 23% by 2030. •Electricity consumption will grow 40% over this time. •Electric power industry will invest $900-billion in new infrastructure projects over the next 15 years. •At least ¼ of existing aging energy infrastructure will need to be replaced during the next 20 years. Advancing renewables technologies… Refs: Center for Energy Workforce Development ASCE Report on Aging Infrastructure
  8. 8. • 8 energy sources • 4 energy demand sectorsBaseline US energy consumption • Line thickness proportional to flow [Quadrillion Btu’s per year (1015)]
  9. 9. • Shift sequestration burden from electricity gen. to H2 productionMassive efficiency/renewables  2050 • Use H2 replaces oil for transpo; off peak Elect  H2 production • Massive efficiencies: 80 mpg H2 light fleet, for example
  10. 10. • Same sources [BillionTons per year] • “Sinks” are volumes vented or captured and sequesteredCorresponding Carbon Flow Chart • Currently no CCS  implications for global warming…(?) 65
  11. 11. • Equal venting and CCS at 2.3 GtCO2/yrCarbonless utilities and transpo  2050 • Capturing all coal  H2 emissions • Optimisitc nuclear & renewables avoid 2.5 GtCO2/yr 25
  12. 12. Energy workforce trends……• Median age of energy workers in U.S. is 45; almost 4 years older than that of most other sectors, and the gap is growing.• By 2014: – More than half of all non-nuclear power plant operators may need to be replaced; – 50% of all power generation technicians will reach retirement eligibility; – Nearly 40% of lineworkers will need to be replaced; – Approximately 45% of all energy engineering jobs may become vacant. Refs: Center for Energy Workforce Development
  13. 13. Depressing Trends in U.S. Education… • High School graduation rates are declining • Rates of students entering STEM fields in colleges declining faster • Retention rates in science and engineering are low & and falling • Academic change is painfully slow… – Curriculum change and infrastructure retooling – Public funding is declining – Accreditation & certification sluggishness
  14. 14. Percentage of population aged 55-64 having completedleast a 2-year college degree; 36 OCED Countries.Source: OECD Education at a Glance; 2010
  15. 15. Percentage of population aged 25-34 having completedleast a 2-year college degree; 36 OCED Countries.Source: OECD Education at a Glance; 2010
  16. 16. U.S. College completion rate has stagnated allowing oureconomic competitors to pass us.Source: OECD Education at a Glance; 2010
  17. 17. Anticipated U.S. Transition and Completion Rates 100% 68.6% 42.3% 28.4% 19.6% 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100%The Springboard Project American Workforce Survey, Benenson Strategy Group
  18. 18. Growth in Engineering Graduates (2010 – 2011) -1% 3.9% 5.9% 9.9% 10.4% -1% 1% 3% 5% 7% 9% 11% Percent Increase
  19. 19. First university degrees in natural sciences and engineering, selected countries: 1998–2006NOTE: Natural sciences include physical, biological, earth, atmospheric, ocean,agricultural, and computer sciences and mathematics.
  20. 20. U.S. Engineering Education Spring 2010 Total US Baccalaureates 1,625,000 US Sciences Baccalaureates 165,000 US Engineering Baccalaureates 74,600 China  630,000 India  370,000Total US Engineering Undergraduates 379,000 Women Engineering Undergraduates 14.0% Hispanic Engineering Undergraduates 6.2% African American Engineering Undergraduates 4.1%
  21. 21. Gender Profile of Engineering Degrees
  22. 22. American score highly in only one area relative totheir international peers: Self Confidence Source OECDPercentage agree or strongly agree Average PISA Score, 2008
  23. 23. CST: Building for future opportunity…Leveraging our Strengths•Building on hands-on education•Student-centered focus•Focusing our visionCharting new Directions•Responding to societal needs  Energy•Responding to workforce needs  Engineering•Responding to local/regional needs  CAP•Responding to Statewide needs  Articulation
  24. 24. The Opportunity & Challenge for Washington EducationCenter on Education and theworkforce; GeorgetownUniversity, 2011
  25. 25. The outlook for Washington  2018Washington will demand a total of 282,140 STEM jobs by2018, up from 227,040 in 2008.94% of these jobs will require postsecondary education.STEM jobs will be 8% of all jobs in Washington in 2018.This represents a 24 percent increase in STEM jobs, 7percentage points above the national average.50% of STEM jobs will be in computer fields 2018.18% of all jobs for Master’s will be in a STEM . Center on Education and the workforce; Georgetown University, 2011 March 16, 2012 TAG Education Summit
  26. 26. Facilitating Alternate PathsCurrent 500,000 to STEM Careers:California9th Graders The California Case Fractionexpected to 62.7% Graduate Enrolling in University Admitted to NS/Eng. NS/Eng Degrees Awarded
  27. 27. Facilitating Alternate PathsCurrent 500,000 to STEM Careers:California9th Graders The California Case Articulation Opportunities: Two-thirds of all students who receive Fraction undergraduate degrees in Science orexpected to Engineering from California Public Universities 62.7% spent some time in a community college. Graduate Enrolled Enrolling in in JC/CC University Admitted to NS/Eng. NS/Eng Degrees Awarded
  28. 28. Thank you
  29. 29. Janice WalkerWorkforce Education Coordinator Whatcom Community College March 2012 – TAG Luncheon
  30. 30.  12, 275 total students served during 2009-10 7,644 total served quarterly 7,007 degree & certificate-seeking students 828 Graduates (770 Associate Degrees) 1:22 Student-Faculty Ratio Annual Operating Budget of $19,700,000 404 employees, including 73 full-time faculty and 185 part-time (adjunct) faculty
  31. 31. Our Promise Statement:We transform lives through education.We accomplish this bySupporting student growthRespecting student investmentEmbracing diversityPromoting excellenceCreating opportunities
  32. 32.  Transfer Degrees (AAS, AS-T)  Associate in Arts & Sciences  Associate in Science Transfer Professional Technical Degrees (AS, AA)  Associate in Science  Associate in Arts Professional Technical Certificates Continuing and Community Education
  33. 33.  Pre-Engineering Computer Science  New certificate in Mobile Applications Computer Information Systems  CIS degree, certificate  Certificates in Network Administration, Tech Support  Short term certificate: Information Security  Expanding: information assurance Pre-Allied Health  Biology, chemistry Visual Communications
  34. 34.  2008-09 revised curriculum  Added Statistics, Mechanics of Materials, Dynamics  Higher level math, physics, chemistry  Degree prepares students for entry to UW, WSU  15 students completed entire engineering sequence in spring 2011 (first of new curriculum) Next steps under consideration  CAD  High school articulations Other focus: Math retention
  35. 35.  National Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Two-Year Education (2011-2016) Member of CyberWatch and CyberWatch West  Funded through NSF/ATE  Enhance capacity, skills  Enhance cybersecurity curriculum at higher ed institutions  WCC’s Corrinne Sande, Co-PI CISCO Networking Academy Industry Certifications:  CISCO Certified Network Associate  CompTIA’s A+  Security +  Network+
  36. 36.  New AS Degree with articulation to WWU New content in SCADA (industrial control systems security) and Virtualization Pursuing articulation agreements with  NWIC and BTC  high schools
  37. 37. Delivers superior professional technical education fortoday’s needs and tomorrow’s opportunities.
  38. 38. Average Age of our Students 31Average Quarterly Headcount 4,05853% Women 47% MenBTC Graduates in 2011 78235 Degrees 64 Certificates
  39. 39.  Civil Engineering Technology Electronics Engineering Technician Mechanical Engineering Technology Instrumentation and Control Technology Surveying and Mapping Computer Networking Computer Software Support Process Technology
  40. 40. Electronics Engineering Technician – 1st YearCourse Title CreditsELTR 100 Direct Current I 4ELTR 105 Direct Current II 4ELTR 110 Alternating Current I 4ELTR 115 Alternating Current II 4ELTR 120 Semiconductors I 5ELTR 125 Semiconductors II 5ELTR 130 OP-AMPS I 3ELTR 135 OP-AMPS II 3ELTR 140 Digital I 5ELTR 145 Digital II 5ETEC 150 Electronic Communications 6Gen Eds PreCalculus, Interpersonal Communications, English course 15
  41. 41. Electronics Engineering Technician – 2nd YearCourse Title CreditsETEC 212 Micro Controller System I 6ETEC 213 Micro Controller System II 6ETEC 281 Robotics 5ETEC 282 Certified Electronics Technician Test Prep 3ETEC 245 Mechatronics I 8ETEC 246 Mechatronics II 8ETEC 236 Photonics 5ETEC 250 Principles of Telecommunication 6ETEC 264 Emerging Technologies 5CTE 292 Career Search 2CAP 101 Introduction to Computer Applications 5OptionalETEC 294 or 296 Work Based Learning 3 or 6
  42. 42. * How can YOU be involved?  Provide Student Internships or Job Shadowing  Volunteer to be a Guest Lecturer  Field Trips  Teach a Class  Serve on an Advisory Committee  Participate on an Industry Panel  Hire our Graduates!
  43. 43. Thank You!Please leave your name badges on the way out. www.tagnw.org

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