Integrating Plants into Chinese Medicine from Outside China: A Methodology<br />Thomas Avery Garran<br />
Why is this important?<br />Chinese medicine is an evolving system, if there is a way to improve it, we should try to do s...
History<br />Chinese medicine has long history of integrating plants from outside of Chinese into Chinese medicine<br />Ex...
Tools<br />Historical usage<br />Understanding thoroughly how a plant has been used historically<br />Botanical relationsh...
Historical Usage<br />Understanding the systems plants have been used in<br />This can be complicated in the West<br />Und...
Historical Usage<br />Looking at different descriptions of plant usage<br />Finding similarities throughout this history<b...
Botanical Relationships<br />History of using botanically related plants<br />Many plants in Chinese medicine have been us...
How we can use these relationships<br />A Western herb with related plant(s) in Chinese medicine; caulophyllum, angelica, ...
Family Relationships<br />Asteraceae<br />Leucanthemumvulgare<br />Apiaceae<br />Ozmorhizaoccidentalis<br />Lamiacea<br />...
Genus Relationships<br />Polygala <br />Chinese name 远志 (multiple species used)<br />Angelica<br />Multiple species used<b...
Special Properties<br />Flavor<br />Understanding how the flavors function<br />Nature<br />The concept of a “temperature”...
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Integrating Plants Into Chinese Medicine From Outside China

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This is a slide show from a lecture I did recently. There I will me using a modified/updated version of this to teach several classes this summer in the US.

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Integrating Plants Into Chinese Medicine From Outside China

  1. 1. Integrating Plants into Chinese Medicine from Outside China: A Methodology<br />Thomas Avery Garran<br />
  2. 2. Why is this important?<br />Chinese medicine is an evolving system, if there is a way to improve it, we should try to do so.<br />Although there are over 5000 plants used throughout China, only about 500 (10%) are used beyond local traditions. This is primarily because the best has been culled out and into the primary medicine.<br />Difference between Chinese medicine practiced in the West and in Asia<br />In the West many patients are already using some of Western herbs<br />Western herbs are often higher quality<br />The use of Western herbs is more sustainable<br />
  3. 3. History<br />Chinese medicine has long history of integrating plants from outside of Chinese into Chinese medicine<br />Example: myrrh, frankincense, American ginseng, corn silk, turmeric, coix, evodia, cinnamon, etc. <br />
  4. 4. Tools<br />Historical usage<br />Understanding thoroughly how a plant has been used historically<br />Botanical relationships<br />Very important as traditionally there have been plants used from same genus or even family as the same herb within Chinese medicine, ex. <br />Chemistry<br />Experience<br />Knowledge and experience in Chinese medicine<br />
  5. 5. Historical Usage<br />Understanding the systems plants have been used in<br />This can be complicated in the West<br />Understanding the historical usage of plants<br />Because of the above, this is both complicating and helpful<br />
  6. 6. Historical Usage<br />Looking at different descriptions of plant usage<br />Finding similarities throughout this history<br />Finding connections between descriptions in Western literature and Chinese theory and materia medica<br />Hypericumperforatum<br />Avenafatua<br />Arnica montana<br />Silybummarianum<br />
  7. 7. Botanical Relationships<br />History of using botanically related plants<br />Many plants in Chinese medicine have been used as the same medicine; several species of Actaea (cimicifuga) used as sheng ma (升麻), Angelica as du huo (独活), Glycyrrhiza (甘草), etc.<br />Family <br />Relationships within families; Apiaceae (Heracleum being used as Angelica (独活), Asteraceae, etc.<br />Genus polygala, calamus, cassia, actaea, clematis<br />
  8. 8. How we can use these relationships<br />A Western herb with related plant(s) in Chinese medicine; caulophyllum, angelica, polygala, calamus, lobelia, etc.<br />Sometimes this there is very different information; lobelia<br />Sometimes there is very similar information; calamus, angelica <br />
  9. 9. Family Relationships<br />Asteraceae<br />Leucanthemumvulgare<br />Apiaceae<br />Ozmorhizaoccidentalis<br />Lamiacea<br />Melissa officinalis<br />
  10. 10. Genus Relationships<br />Polygala <br />Chinese name 远志 (multiple species used)<br />Angelica<br />Multiple species used<br />Ligusticum<br />Chinese names 川芎 and 藁本 (multiple species used)<br />Leonorus<br />Chinese name 益母草 (multiple species used)<br />Scutellaria<br />Chinese names 黄芩 and 半支莲 and others *<br />Scrophularia<br />Chinese name 玄參 (two or more species used)<br />Taraxacum<br />Chinese name 蒲公英 (multiple species used)<br />
  11. 11. Special Properties<br />Flavor<br />Understanding how the flavors function<br />Nature<br />The concept of a “temperature” in different systems may vary<br />Understanding of the “over-all” function of the herb<br />Channels entered<br />Affinity to organs or areas of the body<br />

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