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Academic Libraries and Ebooks:
Models & subject based analysis of usage
Presentation to Academic Programs and Associate
Un...
E-book Data Compiled from Academic
Institutions and Cumulative Reports
 11% of titles received more use in e-book format ...
Data Compiled by a Range of Academic
Institutions and Cumulative Studies
• University of Texas at Dallas
• University of T...
Benefits of E-books
• Unlimited use (many e-books have multiple seats or unlimited access, so
the book is always “in”)
• A...
E-book Use by Discipline
Who Uses E-Books? Who Doesn’t Use E-books
• Greatest use of e-books occurred in Social
Sciences, ...
2009 NAU E-book Usage
(Ebrary & Netlibrary)
• Ebrary Usage
▫ Aug-Nov 20009 370,526 uses
▫ Many titles used hundreds or tho...
Conclusions and Future Directions
• As Humanities publishing of quality e-book collections
continues to grow, ie Books at ...
Sources
• 1.) Cox, John (2009) Adapting to E-books, Chapter “Making Sense of E-
book Usage, p.37
• 2.) Langston, M. (2003)...
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Academic Libraries and Ebooks

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Ebook usage by discipline, and eBook trends.

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Academic Libraries and Ebooks

  1. 1. Academic Libraries and Ebooks: Models & subject based analysis of usage Presentation to Academic Programs and Associate University Librarian May 17, 2011 Tina M. Adams, Academic Programs Librarian
  2. 2. E-book Data Compiled from Academic Institutions and Cumulative Reports  11% of titles received more use in e-book format than the print version of the same book (a single circulation of a print book takes up a longer period of time). 1  At many institutions, though print circulation has gone down, e-book circulation has risen to account for about 23% of total circulation, reaching nearly the level of print book circulation 1  39% of titles were used in both e-book and print formats, 34% of titles were used as e-books only and 27% were used as print titles only. 1  27% of users have only ever used an e-book once, 10% of users use e-books frequently, most, about 70% have used e-books occasionally 1  40% of users, used an e-book because there was no print book available1  42% of users like to use e-books when working from home1  55% of users, used an e-book because they are searchable1  71% of titles that do not circulate in print, are not accessed as e-books either1  Reference books were especially preferred as e-books1  More than 23% of the libraries in the sample owned some kind of stand alone ebook reading device (Kindles, Nooks, etc) 5 Expectations are that NAU usage would be similar and we do have an upcoming pilot to test the Purchase Driven Acquisition model of e-book purchasing which should give us some data on e- book usage at NAU.
  3. 3. Data Compiled by a Range of Academic Institutions and Cumulative Studies • University of Texas at Dallas • University of Texas at Austin • California State University, Langston • National University of Ireland at Galway • Louisiana State University • Auburn University • University of Pittsburgh • Primary Research Group’s, Library Use of E-books, 2011 Report (compiled from a large sample of academic and public libraries)
  4. 4. Benefits of E-books • Unlimited use (many e-books have multiple seats or unlimited access, so the book is always “in”) • Available from anywhere (Home, work, travelling) and anytime (not bound by Library Hours) and for distance students, doesn’t require waiting for books to be shipped to them • Portability via e-readers, ipads, laptops etc (potentially though academic publishers haven’t been as quick to go mobile (e-readers) as others, the trend is beginning) • Usable for Course Reserves and imbedding readings into Learning Management Systems • Integration into Library Catalog, makes e-books more “findable” • Ability to search the full text of a book • Ability to resize text • Definition lookup and Annotation functions
  5. 5. E-book Use by Discipline Who Uses E-Books? Who Doesn’t Use E-books • Greatest use of e-books occurred in Social Sciences, Economics & Business, Medicine, Sociology, Psychology and Literature. • E-books in Education, Medicine, Psychology and Computing were used more than print books • E-books in Science & Technology are used 6-17 times more than the print version of the same book • Computer books are used 207 times more in e-book version than print version • In the Social Sciences, Business and Literature a single title was equally likely to be used in print and e-book format • Strong uptake overall in the use of e-books Humanities Researchers: • Rely heavily on the library catalog as their starting point for research, so e-book access through the catalog is critical. • Are more aware of e-books because they encounter them via the catalog, but are less inclined to use e-books than faculty and undergraduates in other disciplines • Graduate students were 10% more likely to use e-books than other Grad students. • 55% of Humanities researches used an e-book because there was no print book available • 68% of all Humanities researchers say they would always prefer the print version over an e-version of the book, while 60% of other users state that they would always or usually prefer print
  6. 6. 2009 NAU E-book Usage (Ebrary & Netlibrary) • Ebrary Usage ▫ Aug-Nov 20009 370,526 uses ▫ Many titles used hundreds or thousands of times • NetLibrary Usage ▫ 8,000 uses ▫ Usage is lower because NetLibrary titles are olders and uses “check out” model which means a book can only be used by one person at a time.
  7. 7. Conclusions and Future Directions • As Humanities publishing of quality e-book collections continues to grow, ie Books at JSTOR publishes e-books from prominent publishers, collections such as Manuscript Women's Letters and Diaries, Oxford Scholarship Online--Humanities researchers may find e- books beneficial and become less averse to using them. • Functionality and Interoperability of e-books offered to Academic Libraries is improving. • As more publishers increase functionality, such as more liberal downloading and printing policies and ability to download books to e-readers and mobile devices, we believe student use will increase even more than it has.
  8. 8. Sources • 1.) Cox, John (2009) Adapting to E-books, Chapter “Making Sense of E- book Usage, p.37 • 2.) Langston, M. (2003) The California State University E-book Pilot Project: Implications for Cooperative Collection Development. Library Collections, Acquisitions and Technical Services, 27 (1) 19-32 • 3.) Levine-Clark, M. (2007) Electronic Books and the humanities: A survey at the University of Denver. Collection Building, 26(1), 7-14. • 4.) Littman, 2004 A Circulation Analysis of print books and e-books in an academic research library. Library Resources and Technical Services, 48 (4) 256-262. • 5.) Primary Research Group. (2010). Library use of ebooks, 2011 edition. New York, N.Y: Primary Research Group. • 6.) Safley. E (2006) Demand for e-books in an academic library. Journal of Library Administration, 45(3-4) 445-457.

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