OSWEGO COUNTY BOCES               NEW EMPLOYEE               SAFETY TRAININGJanuary 2013
ADMINISTRATIONWelcomeLife safety proceduresFacilitiesSign inIntroductions Tom Abbott, Safety Officer 963-4271, Ext. 271...
OBJECTIVES• Provide overview of BOCES emergency  response procedures.• Discuss common safety threats and  prevention measu...
HTTP://SAFETY.OSWEGOBOCES.ORG/YOUR ONLINE SAFETY RESOURCE
WORKPLACE HAZARDS Armed intruder Hazardous materials Natural disaster Bomb threatOperation of equipment FireCommuni...
OSHA HIERARCHY OF SAFETY Engineering   Mechanical deterrents to shield employee from    hazard. Administrative   Safe ...
OUR DUTIES UNDER OSHAEmployer shall:Provide safe workplace for employees.Comply with OSHA health and safety standards.Em...
COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN• BOCES emergency planning and procedural  guidelines.• Every employee is responsib...
CEMP COMPONENTS•   Base plan•   Functional Annexes•   Hazard Specific Appendices
BASE PLANRoles and ResponsibilitiesPrevention & MitigationPreparednessResponse- ICSRecovery
INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM• A standardized incident management concept.• Flexible, scalable response system• Span of control ...
SAMPLE TERMINOLOGYIncident Commander - The individual who is   responsible for overall management of all incident   operat...
X
Fire Drill ICS                                    Accountability                                       OfficerEvacuation A...
Superintendent                            Planning                Logistics               Finance/Evacuation Ops          ...
PIO                                        Unified Command                     Safety                                     ...
HTTP://SAFETY.OSWEGOBOCES.ORG/INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM FOR           SCHOOLS
UNIVERSAL RESPONSE PROCEDURESSection 8.4 of CEMP Lock Down Shelter-in-Place Evacuation
LOCK DOWN•   High to Severe Alert Response.•   Limit entry and exit within your safe area.•   Cover and Conceal•   No one ...
SHELTER-IN-PLACE• Guarded Alert response.• Limit movement of students and staff.• Teaching and work can continue in  indiv...
EVACUATIONOn-site evacuation  Exit to exterior or alternate buildingReverse evacuation  Move back into building.Off-s...
MITIGATE HAZARDS• Be aware of suspicious activity or odd  behavior.• Be vigilant to strange packages, items or  substances...
BE PREPAREDKnow the location of exits and how window exits work.Keep rescue window clear.Know your Universal Response P...
RESPOND PROPERLY Keep calm and assess the situation. Contact your Supervisor or Responders. Follow announced response m...
STUDENT-ON-STUDENT VIOLENCE You are not required to physically intervene, but  you must take some action to control the  ...
SPECIFIC HAZARDS
FIRES    Average of 6,000 structure fires per year occur in     schools in the U.S.    They account for 88 civilian inju...
DEADLY SCHOOL FIRES1908 March 4th. USA, Ohio, Collinwood, Lakeview Elementary School: a fire at   around 9:30 a.m. destroy...
FF Richard ScheidtJohn Jaikowski, Jr.
RESULTING REQUIREMENTS Prevention   Routine inspections, disposal of refuse Mitigation   Building construction Prepar...
YOUR RESPONSIBILITIESDETECT fire hazardsDETER by using safe practicesDEFEND by:  Knowing how lead your students to safety...
EXTINGUISHER CLASSIFICATIONS
EXTINGUISHER TYPES  Pressurized Water                     CO2      Class A                         Class BC               ...
EXTINGUISHING METHOD
HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Employer Requirements  Hazard Communication Program  Material Safety Data Sheets  Assure proper la...
REQUIRED MSDS INFO Name(s) of substance Physical and chemical characteristics Health hazards  Signs and symptoms  Fir...
LABELS
http://safety.oswegoboces.org/
ASBESTOS Friable vs. non-friable Most school building constructed before the  mid-80’s have or had ACMs Asbestos Hazard...
LOCK-OUT / TAG-OUT Method for protecting maintenance  personnel from injury:  Electrical equipment  Hydraulic equipment...
FIRST AID Trained medical providers Contact School Nurse or Switchboard Making the call E-911
COMMUNICABLE DISEASES                Blood borne pathogens                Air borne pathogens
BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS Definition: “a micro-organism that may be  present in blood or body fluids that can cause  disease i...
HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS HIV damages immune system. Causes AIDS Infected people represent all ages, races, sexes an...
HEPATITIS B AND C VIRUS Hepatitis is an  inflammation of the liver  caused by a virus or toxin. Transmitted by exposure ...
HEPATITIS B AND C VIRUS  Can be acute or chronic.  Can lead to scarring of the liver (cirrhosis)   and liver cancer.  1...
ACUTE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS•    Fever              • Abdominal pain•    Fatigue            • Dark urine•    Loss of appetite ...
CHRONIC HBV AND HBC INFECTION Chronic HBV and HCV are often described as  „silent diseases‟. Most chronic victims remain...
BBP TRANSMISSION Exposure to infectious body fluids:  Blood  Semen  Vaginal fluid  Breast milk  Cerebrospinal fluid ...
LIFESTYLE PRECAUTIONS   Avoid unprotected sex   Avoid promiscuous sex   Avoid sex with IV drug users   Do not share IV...
UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS Treat ALL blood and body fluids as though  they are infectious. Avoid exposure by using protective...
HEPATITIS B VACCINE  Provides protection against HBV up to 15   years or more.  May prevent infection if given within 1 ...
AT RISK EMPLOYEES   School nurses   Health care faculty   Custodians   Maintenance workers   Special Education, Admin...
GOOD SAMARITAN ACTS Voluntary acts which result in exposure to  blood or other potentially infection materials  are not c...
PROTECT YOURSELF If you are classified as an at-risk  employee, request HBV vaccine series. Wear disposable gloves if bl...
POST-EXPOSURE ACTIONS Wash needle sticks and cuts with soap and water. Flush splashes to the nose, mouth or skin with   ...
AIR BORNE PATHOGEN Disease causing micro-organisms  that may be present in sputum and  body fluids that can be spread by ...
INFLUENZA VIRUS A viral infection which is  spread by close contact  with an infected person. The infection may  cause d...
N Spikes                            H                            Spikes           Viral Antigens
INFLUENZA Caused by the seasonal influenza virus  and in some cases alternate viruses. H1N1 (Swine Flu)  Spreads simila...
ELIMINATION OF EXPOSURE Sick students and staff stay home. Deny entry of sick visitors. Social distancing. Isolate stu...
ENGINEERING CONTROLS Reduce the hazard by removing the hazard  or isolating the worker from the hazard.  Waterless soap ...
PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Surgical gloves N-95 respirators Gloves
WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS Do not share glasses or utensils Limit physical contact, like shaking hands “Cough and sneeze et...
HOW TO WASH YOUR HANDS…    Best way to avoid spreading disease.
OSHAU.S. Department of LaborPromulgates regulationsEnforce regulations with the exception of State workers.NYS Public Em...
WRAP UP29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health  Standards Subpart E – Means of egress   1910.39 Fire Prevention Plans...
QUESTIONS?Michael Sterio,                Tom AbbottDirector Safety and Security   Safety Officer963-4289                  ...
Safety orientation 5.0
Safety orientation 5.0
Safety orientation 5.0
Safety orientation 5.0
Safety orientation 5.0
Safety orientation 5.0
Safety orientation 5.0
Safety orientation 5.0
Safety orientation 5.0
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Safety orientation 5.0

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Safety orientation 5.0

  1. 1. OSWEGO COUNTY BOCES NEW EMPLOYEE SAFETY TRAININGJanuary 2013
  2. 2. ADMINISTRATIONWelcomeLife safety proceduresFacilitiesSign inIntroductions Tom Abbott, Safety Officer 963-4271, Ext. 271 tabbott@oswegoboces.org
  3. 3. OBJECTIVES• Provide overview of BOCES emergency response procedures.• Discuss common safety threats and prevention measures.• Inform you of your Right-to-Know• Help you navigate to available online safety resources.
  4. 4. HTTP://SAFETY.OSWEGOBOCES.ORG/YOUR ONLINE SAFETY RESOURCE
  5. 5. WORKPLACE HAZARDS Armed intruder Hazardous materials Natural disaster Bomb threatOperation of equipment FireCommunicable diseasesWMD
  6. 6. OSHA HIERARCHY OF SAFETY Engineering Mechanical deterrents to shield employee from hazard. Administrative Safe work practice protocols Personal Protective Equipment (PPE)
  7. 7. OUR DUTIES UNDER OSHAEmployer shall:Provide safe workplace for employees.Comply with OSHA health and safety standards.Employee shall:Comply with standards, rules and regulations issued pursuant to OSH Act.
  8. 8. COMPREHENSIVE EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT PLAN• BOCES emergency planning and procedural guidelines.• Every employee is responsible for learning procedures applicable to their workplace.• http://teams.oswegoboces.org/Documents/CEMP 01Oct09PublicDomainFinal.pdf
  9. 9. CEMP COMPONENTS• Base plan• Functional Annexes• Hazard Specific Appendices
  10. 10. BASE PLANRoles and ResponsibilitiesPrevention & MitigationPreparednessResponse- ICSRecovery
  11. 11. INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM• A standardized incident management concept.• Flexible, scalable response system• Span of control and communication Incident Command Operations Planning Logistics Finance/ Section Section Section Administration Section
  12. 12. SAMPLE TERMINOLOGYIncident Commander - The individual who is responsible for overall management of all incident operations.Logistics Section Chief – The individual who is responsible for providing facilities, services and materials for the incident.Operations Section Chief – The individual who is responsible for all tactical operations at the incident.Safety Officer – Member of the command staff who is responsible for monitoring and assessing safety hazards, addressing unsafe situations, and developing measures to ensure personnel safety.
  13. 13. X
  14. 14. Fire Drill ICS Accountability OfficerEvacuation Area #1 Evacuation Area #2 Evacuation Area #3 Evacuation Area #4 Teachers Teachers Teachers Teachers Students Students Students Students
  15. 15. Superintendent Planning Logistics Finance/Evacuation Ops Section Section Administration Section Evacuation Area #1 Transportation Evacuation Area #2 Reunification Evacuation Area #3 Evacuation Area #4
  16. 16. PIO Unified Command Safety Liaison Planning Logistics Finance/Operations Section Section Section Administration Section Evacuation Section Transportation Fire Department Communication EMS Reunification Law Enforcement Equipment/Supplies
  17. 17. HTTP://SAFETY.OSWEGOBOCES.ORG/INCIDENT COMMAND SYSTEM FOR SCHOOLS
  18. 18. UNIVERSAL RESPONSE PROCEDURESSection 8.4 of CEMP Lock Down Shelter-in-Place Evacuation
  19. 19. LOCK DOWN• High to Severe Alert Response.• Limit entry and exit within your safe area.• Cover and Conceal• No one enters your space.• Put as many barriers between you and students and person who wants to do harm.
  20. 20. SHELTER-IN-PLACE• Guarded Alert response.• Limit movement of students and staff.• Teaching and work can continue in individual work space.
  21. 21. EVACUATIONOn-site evacuation Exit to exterior or alternate buildingReverse evacuation Move back into building.Off-site evacuation Move to location off-campus
  22. 22. MITIGATE HAZARDS• Be aware of suspicious activity or odd behavior.• Be vigilant to strange packages, items or substances.• Listen to what is going on.• Immediately report suspicious activity or potentially dangerous conditions.
  23. 23. BE PREPAREDKnow the location of exits and how window exits work.Keep rescue window clear.Know your Universal Response Procedures
  24. 24. RESPOND PROPERLY Keep calm and assess the situation. Contact your Supervisor or Responders. Follow announced response measures.Evacuate, relocate or shelter in place. Identify yourself and cooperate with responders.
  25. 25. STUDENT-ON-STUDENT VIOLENCE You are not required to physically intervene, but you must take some action to control the situation: Contact Security by phone (Ext. 289) Contact Security by radio (Channel #1) Contact the Operator (Dial 0) who will then notify Security by radio. Contact you supervisor.
  26. 26. SPECIFIC HAZARDS
  27. 27. FIRES  Average of 6,000 structure fires per year occur in schools in the U.S.  They account for 88 civilian injuries and $90M in direct property damage.  Common causes in K-12 schools: Trash fire Cooking fire Incendiary* USFA study 2003-2006.
  28. 28. DEADLY SCHOOL FIRES1908 March 4th. USA, Ohio, Collinwood, Lakeview Elementary School: a fire at around 9:30 a.m. destroyed the wooden structure in Collinwood, a city of 8,000 people 7 miles northeast of Cleveland; 174 children and two teachers were killed1923 May 17th. USA, South Carolina, Beulah, Cleveland School: during a school play with more than 300 people in the audience a lamp fell down and started a fire; 77 people died, 47 of them were under the age of 181924 December 24th. -- USA, Oklahoma, Hobart, Babb Switch School; 35 people died during a stage performance of the annual Christmas songfest a candle felt into the branches of the Christmas tree causing it to burst into flames in the one-room schoolhouse; 36 people, mostly small children died.1937, March 18th. USA, Texas, New London: explosion and subsequent fire in a school building due to a gas leak in the heating system; 500 people, mostly children, died1954 March 31st. USA, New York, Buffalo: explosion and fire in a school annex building due to a gas leak; 15 6th graders killed.1958 December 1st. USA, Illinois, Chicago, Fire at "Our Lady of the Angels" school, 90 pupils and 3 nuns died
  29. 29. FF Richard ScheidtJohn Jaikowski, Jr.
  30. 30. RESULTING REQUIREMENTS Prevention  Routine inspections, disposal of refuse Mitigation  Building construction Preparedness  Evacuation plans, fire drills Response  Detection and alerting systems  Fire extinguishers
  31. 31. YOUR RESPONSIBILITIESDETECT fire hazardsDETER by using safe practicesDEFEND by: Knowing how lead your students to safety. Knowing where fire alarm pull stations are. Shutting the doors as you leave.DEFEAT by removing or reporting hazards
  32. 32. EXTINGUISHER CLASSIFICATIONS
  33. 33. EXTINGUISHER TYPES Pressurized Water CO2 Class A Class BC Dry Chemical Class A, B, C
  34. 34. EXTINGUISHING METHOD
  35. 35. HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Employer Requirements Hazard Communication Program Material Safety Data Sheets Assure proper labeling Training
  36. 36. REQUIRED MSDS INFO Name(s) of substance Physical and chemical characteristics Health hazards Signs and symptoms First aid Fire/explosion hazards Safe handling measures PPE
  37. 37. LABELS
  38. 38. http://safety.oswegoboces.org/
  39. 39. ASBESTOS Friable vs. non-friable Most school building constructed before the mid-80’s have or had ACMs Asbestos Hazards Emergency Response Act of 1986 (AHERA) Asbestos is present in some BOCES buildings in secured or encapsulated form. According to EPA, the risk of airborne fibers is very low.
  40. 40. LOCK-OUT / TAG-OUT Method for protecting maintenance personnel from injury: Electrical equipment Hydraulic equipment Pneumatic equipment
  41. 41. FIRST AID Trained medical providers Contact School Nurse or Switchboard Making the call E-911
  42. 42. COMMUNICABLE DISEASES Blood borne pathogens Air borne pathogens
  43. 43. BLOODBORNE PATHOGENS Definition: “a micro-organism that may be present in blood or body fluids that can cause disease in humans”. Bloodborne viruses include: HIV HBV (Hep-B) HCV (Hep-C)
  44. 44. HUMAN IMMUNODEFICIENCY VIRUS HIV damages immune system. Causes AIDS Infected people represent all ages, races, sexes and lifestyles. There is no vaccine or cure. Spread by contact with infected blood or body fluids. NYS has highest prevalence of HIV/AIDs
  45. 45. HEPATITIS B AND C VIRUS Hepatitis is an inflammation of the liver caused by a virus or toxin. Transmitted by exposure to infected blood or body fluids.
  46. 46. HEPATITIS B AND C VIRUS  Can be acute or chronic.  Can lead to scarring of the liver (cirrhosis) and liver cancer.  1.25 million in US have chronic HBV.  HBV is 100 times more infectious that HIV  HCV is the leading cause of liver transplants Source: CDC
  47. 47. ACUTE SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS• Fever • Abdominal pain• Fatigue • Dark urine• Loss of appetite • Clay-colored bowel movements• Nausea • Joint pain• Vomiting • Jaundice
  48. 48. CHRONIC HBV AND HBC INFECTION Chronic HBV and HCV are often described as „silent diseases‟. Most chronic victims remain asymptomatic until the onset of cirrhosis or end-stage liver disease. They don‟t know they are carriers, and neither will you.
  49. 49. BBP TRANSMISSION Exposure to infectious body fluids: Blood Semen Vaginal fluid Breast milk Cerebrospinal fluid Other body materials with visible blood
  50. 50. LIFESTYLE PRECAUTIONS Avoid unprotected sex Avoid promiscuous sex Avoid sex with IV drug users Do not share IV needles
  51. 51. UNIVERSAL PRECAUTIONS Treat ALL blood and body fluids as though they are infectious. Avoid exposure by using protective barriers. (i.e., nonporous gloves, goggles) Prevent penetrating injuries with proper engineering and procedures. (i.e., sharps containers, self-retracting needles)
  52. 52. HEPATITIS B VACCINE  Provides protection against HBV up to 15 years or more.  May prevent infection if given within 1 week of exposure.  Employees with risk of occupational exposure should get vaccinated.  Vaccine is offered at no cost to designated „at-risk‟ employees.
  53. 53. AT RISK EMPLOYEES School nurses Health care faculty Custodians Maintenance workers Special Education, Administrators Teachers and TAs Bus Drivers and Aides Security officers Job coaches
  54. 54. GOOD SAMARITAN ACTS Voluntary acts which result in exposure to blood or other potentially infection materials are not considered an occupational exposure unless the employee is designated to do so (i.e., school nurse providing first aid) However, in such cases the District will offer post-exposure evaluation and follow- up.
  55. 55. PROTECT YOURSELF If you are classified as an at-risk employee, request HBV vaccine series. Wear disposable gloves if blood or possibly infectious body fluids are present. Avoid handling broken glass or uncapped needles. Clean up should be done by designated custodial staff.
  56. 56. POST-EXPOSURE ACTIONS Wash needle sticks and cuts with soap and water. Flush splashes to the nose, mouth or skin with water. Irrigate eyes with clean water, saline, or sterile irrigants. Report exposure to the nurse, who will initiate the evaluation and follow-up process.
  57. 57. AIR BORNE PATHOGEN Disease causing micro-organisms that may be present in sputum and body fluids that can be spread by droplet or air borne transmission.
  58. 58. INFLUENZA VIRUS A viral infection which is spread by close contact with an infected person. The infection may cause discomfort, fever and in some extreme cases death.
  59. 59. N Spikes H Spikes Viral Antigens
  60. 60. INFLUENZA Caused by the seasonal influenza virus and in some cases alternate viruses. H1N1 (Swine Flu) Spreads similarly to seasonal flu Source: CDC
  61. 61. ELIMINATION OF EXPOSURE Sick students and staff stay home. Deny entry of sick visitors. Social distancing. Isolate students with flu-like symptoms.
  62. 62. ENGINEERING CONTROLS Reduce the hazard by removing the hazard or isolating the worker from the hazard. Waterless soap Vaccinations- Protect against seasonal or H1N1.
  63. 63. PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT Surgical gloves N-95 respirators Gloves
  64. 64. WORK PRACTICE CONTROLS Do not share glasses or utensils Limit physical contact, like shaking hands “Cough and sneeze etiquette” Wash hands often
  65. 65. HOW TO WASH YOUR HANDS… Best way to avoid spreading disease.
  66. 66. OSHAU.S. Department of LaborPromulgates regulationsEnforce regulations with the exception of State workers.NYS Public Employee Safety and Health (PESH)Enforcement of Federal regulations for State employees.
  67. 67. WRAP UP29 CFR 1910 Occupational Safety and Health Standards Subpart E – Means of egress  1910.39 Fire Prevention Plans Subpart I – Personal Protective Equipment Subpart J – General Environmental Controls  1910.147 Lock-Out / Tag-Out Subpart K – First Aid Subpart L – Fire Protection Subpart Z – Toxic and Hazardous Substances  1910.1030 – Blood Borne Pathogens  1910.1200 – Hazard Communications
  68. 68. QUESTIONS?Michael Sterio, Tom AbbottDirector Safety and Security Safety Officer963-4289 963-4271msterio@oswegoboces.org tabbott@oswegoboces.org

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