The Origins and        Development of The English                Language                       The Adventure of English  ...
CONTENTS                      Beowulf                      The Canterbury Tales                      John Wycliffe        ...
ANCIENT TIMES2011년	 5월	 13일	 금요일
43-ca. 420: Roman invasion and             occupation of Britain ca. 450:             Anglo-Saxon Conquest 597:           ...
Beowulf       The greatest of the Old English poems is       Beowulf, the tale of a Scandinavian hero who       goes to th...
Hwaet,              we Gar-Dena   in geardagum  Mynte se manscaða manna cynnes  summa besyrwan in selepam hean.  Onbrædpa ...
Hwaet,              we Gar-Dena   in geardagum  Mynte se manscaða manna cynnes  summa besyrwan in selepam hean.  Onbrædpa ...
Hwaet,              we Gar-Dena          in geardagum  Mynte se manscaða manna cynnes  summa besyrwan in selepam hean.  On...
So,        the Spear-Danes   in days gone byThe bane of the race of manroamed forth, hunting for prey in the high hall.Whe...
So,        the Spear-Danes   in days gone byThe bane of the race of manroamed forth, hunting for prey in the high hall.Whe...
So,        the Spear-Danes   in days gone byThe bane of the race of manroamed forth, hunting for prey in the high hall.Whe...
So,        the Spear-Danes                             in days gone byThe bane of the race of manroamed forth, hunting for...
90                                      Sᴂgde se ᴘe  cupe                                            said  he who knew [ho...
In Old English spelling, ᴂ (line 90) is a vowel symbol that  represents the vowel of Modern English cat  p (line 90) and ð...
One point which seemed almost the clincher in   Early English’s claim to poetic greatness including   Beowulf is its capac...
I am Grandel’s mother                           http://www.youtube.com/watch?                                   v=v9qpqyO_...
The middle age2011년	 5월	 13일	 금요일
1066:               Norman Conquest  1154-1189: Reign of Henry 2  ca. 1200:           Beginning of Middle English         ...
Geoffrey Chaucer       Chaucer decided to write not in Latin - which       he knew well - not in the French from which he ...
The Canterbury Tales        Through skilful stories told by a group of        pilgrims to ease the time as they ride from ...
Whan that April with his showres soote The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich lic...
Whan that April with his showres soote The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich lic...
Whan that April with his showres soote The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich lic...
Whan that April with his showres soote The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich lic...
When April with his sweet showers haspierced the dryness of March to the root,and bathed every vein in such moistureas has...
About twenty to twenty-five percent of the   vocabulary used by Chaucer is from the French. In   that short extract there’s...
John Wycliffe   He born near Richmond in   Yorkshire, admitted to Merton   College, Oxford.   Wycliffe inspired two biblic...
In the bigynnyng God made of nouyt heuene and erthe.Forsothe the erthe was idel and voide, and derknessis weren on theface...
many familiar phrases do have their English origin in this translation: “an eye for an eye” are both in Wycliffe, as are w...
William Tyndale    Like Wycliffe, Tyndale was an Oxford classical scholar.    In 1535, Tyndale was arrested by church auth...
In the begynnynge God created heven and erth.      The erth was voyde and emptic and darcknesse was vpon the      depe and...
In the bigynnyng God made of nouyt heuene and erthe.  Forsothe the erthe was idel and voide, and derknessis weren on  the ...
Elizabeth 12011년	 5월	 13일	 금요일
Elizabeth 1  My loving people, we have been perswaded by some, that are  careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit...
Elizabeth 1  My loving people, we have been perswaded by some, that are  careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit...
Elizabeth 1  My loving people, we have been perswaded by some, that are  careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit...
Elizabeth 1  My loving people, we have been perswaded by some, that are  careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit...
William Shakespeare  William Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright,  widely regarded as the greatest writer in th...
18 Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds ...
Thank You                      for listening2011년	 5월	 13일	 금요일
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The Adventure of English

  1. 1. The Origins and Development of The English Language The Adventure of English 2011KU0083 JUNEWOO, PARK2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  2. 2. CONTENTS Beowulf The Canterbury Tales John Wycliffe William Tyndale Elizabeth William Shakespeare2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  3. 3. ANCIENT TIMES2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  4. 4. 43-ca. 420: Roman invasion and occupation of Britain ca. 450: Anglo-Saxon Conquest 597: St. Augustine arrives in Kent; beginning of Anglo-Saxon conversion to Christianity 871-899: Reign of King Alfred2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  5. 5. Beowulf The greatest of the Old English poems is Beowulf, the tale of a Scandinavian hero who goes to the aid of Hrothgar, the Danish King, to defend him against the monster Grendel. It has been called the first great poem in the English language.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  6. 6. Hwaet, we Gar-Dena in geardagum Mynte se manscaða manna cynnes summa besyrwan in selepam hean. Onbrædpa bealohydig, pa he gebolgen waes, recedes mupan. . . ac he gefeng hraðe forman siðe slæpendne rinc slat unwearnum, bat banlocan, blod edrum dranc, synsnædum swealh; sona haefde unlyfigendes eal gefeormod, fet ond folma.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  7. 7. Hwaet, we Gar-Dena in geardagum Mynte se manscaða manna cynnes summa besyrwan in selepam hean. Onbrædpa bealohydig, pa he gebolgen waes, recedes mupan. . . ac he gefeng hraðe forman siðe slæpendne rinc slat unwearnum, bat banlocan, blod edrum dranc, synsnædum swealh; sona haefde unlyfigendes eal gefeormod, fet ond folma.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  8. 8. Hwaet, we Gar-Dena in geardagum Mynte se manscaða manna cynnes summa besyrwan in selepam hean. Onbrædpa bealohydig, pa he gebolgen waes, recedes mupan. . . ac he gefeng hraðe forman siðe slæpendne rinc slat unwearnum, bat banlocan, blod edrum dranc, synsnædum swealh; sona haefde unlyfigendes eal gefeormod, fet ond folma. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4L7VTH8ii_82011년 5월 13일 금요일
  9. 9. So, the Spear-Danes in days gone byThe bane of the race of manroamed forth, hunting for prey in the high hall.When his rage boiled overHe ripped open the mouth of the buildingMaddening for blood. . .He grabbed and mauled a man on his benchBit into his bone lappings, bolted down his bloodAnd gorged on him in lumpsLeaving the body utterly lifelessEaten up, hand and foot.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  10. 10. So, the Spear-Danes in days gone byThe bane of the race of manroamed forth, hunting for prey in the high hall.When his rage boiled overHe ripped open the mouth of the buildingMaddening for blood. . .He grabbed and mauled a man on his benchBit into his bone lappings, bolted down his bloodAnd gorged on him in lumpsLeaving the body utterly lifelessEaten up, hand and foot.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  11. 11. So, the Spear-Danes in days gone byThe bane of the race of manroamed forth, hunting for prey in the high hall.When his rage boiled overHe ripped open the mouth of the buildingMaddening for blood. . .He grabbed and mauled a man on his benchBit into his bone lappings, bolted down his bloodAnd gorged on him in lumpsLeaving the body utterly lifelessEaten up, hand and foot.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  12. 12. So, the Spear-Danes in days gone byThe bane of the race of manroamed forth, hunting for prey in the high hall.When his rage boiled overHe ripped open the mouth of the buildingMaddening for blood. . .He grabbed and mauled a man on his benchBit into his bone lappings, bolted down his bloodAnd gorged on him in lumpsLeaving the body utterly lifelessEaten up, hand and foot. http:/ v=CbvEz3s1Xm4 /www.youtube.com/watch?2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  13. 13. 90 Sᴂgde se ᴘe cupe said he who knew [how] ʄrumsceaft ʄira ʄeorran reccan, [the] origin [of] men from far [time] [to] recount, cwᴂð pᴂt se ᴁlmightiga eorðan worhte, said that the Almighty [the]earth wrought wlite-beorhtne wang, swa wᴂter bebugeð, beauty-bright plain as water surrounds [it] gesette sige-hrepig sunnan ond monan, set triumph-glorious sun and moon2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  14. 14. In Old English spelling, ᴂ (line 90) is a vowel symbol that represents the vowel of Modern English cat p (line 90) and ð (line 92) both represent the sound th. The spelling sc (line 91) = sh c (line 92) = k.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  15. 15. One point which seemed almost the clincher in Early English’s claim to poetic greatness including Beowulf is its capacity to make up extra words: “ban-hus” (bone-house, for “body”) “gleo-beam” (glee-wood, for “harp”) “wig-bord” (war-board, for “shield”) “hwæl-wag (whale’s-way, for “sea”) “wæg-hengest” (wave-steed, for “boat”)2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  16. 16. I am Grandel’s mother http://www.youtube.com/watch? v=v9qpqyO_dmU2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  17. 17. The middle age2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  18. 18. 1066: Norman Conquest 1154-1189: Reign of Henry 2 ca. 1200: Beginning of Middle English literature 1345-1400: Geoffrey Chaucer 1485: William Caxton’s printing of Sir Thomas Malory’s Morte Darther, one of the first books printed in England2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  19. 19. Geoffrey Chaucer Chaucer decided to write not in Latin - which he knew well - not in the French from which he translated and which might have given him greater prestige, but in English, his own English, London-based English2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  20. 20. The Canterbury Tales Through skilful stories told by a group of pilgrims to ease the time as they ride from Southwark in London to Canterbury Cathedral.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  21. 21. Whan that April with his showres soote The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich licour, Of which vertu engendred is the flowr; When Zephyrus eek with his sweete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his halve cours yronne, And smale fowles maken melodye That sleepen al the night with open yë - So priketh hem Nature in hir corages - Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  22. 22. Whan that April with his showres soote The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich licour, Of which vertu engendred is the flowr; When Zephyrus eek with his sweete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his halve cours yronne, And smale fowles maken melodye That sleepen al the night with open yë - So priketh hem Nature in hir corages - Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  23. 23. Whan that April with his showres soote The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich licour, Of which vertu engendred is the flowr; When Zephyrus eek with his sweete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his halve cours yronne, And smale fowles maken melodye That sleepen al the night with open yë - So priketh hem Nature in hir corages - Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages,2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  24. 24. Whan that April with his showres soote The droughte of March hath perced to the roote, And bathed every veine in swich licour, Of which vertu engendred is the flowr; When Zephyrus eek with his sweete breeth Inspired hath in every holt and heeth The tendre croppes, and the yonge sonne Hath in the Ram his halve cours yronne, And smale fowles maken melodye That sleepen al the night with open yë - So priketh hem Nature in hir corages - Thanne longen folk to goon on pilgrimages, http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QE0MtENfOMU2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  25. 25. When April with his sweet showers haspierced the dryness of March to the root,and bathed every vein in such moistureas has power to bring forth the flower;when, also, Zephyrus with his sweet breathhas breathed spirit into the tender new shootsin every wood and meadow, and the young sunhas run half his course in the sign of the Ram,and small birds sing melodies andsleep with their eyes open all the night(so Nature pricks them in their hearts):then people long to go on pilgrimages,2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  26. 26. About twenty to twenty-five percent of the vocabulary used by Chaucer is from the French. In that short extract there’s an average of at least one French word per line: “April,” “March,” “perced,” “veyne,” “lycour,” “vertu,” “engendred,” “flour,” “inspired.” Often they have meanings now lost: “lycour” = moisture; “vertu” = power. “Zephirus” is from Latin, “root” is from Old Norse. This language is English. All the words called by linguists “function words” - pronouns and prepositions - are from Old English.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  27. 27. John Wycliffe He born near Richmond in Yorkshire, admitted to Merton College, Oxford. Wycliffe inspired two biblical translations and rightly they bear his name. Both versions are made from the Latin Vulgate version.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  28. 28. In the bigynnyng God made of nouyt heuene and erthe.Forsothe the erthe was idel and voide, and derknessis weren on theface of depthe; and the Spiryt of the Lord was borun on the watris.And God seide, Liyt be maad, and liyt was maad.And God seiy the liyt, that it was good, and he departide the liyt froderknessis; and he clepide the liyt , dai, and the derknessis, nyyt.And the euentid and morwetid was maad, o daie.In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth.Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over thesurface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over thewaters.And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. 4 God sawthat the light was good, and he separated the light from thedarkness.God called the light “day,” and the darkness he called “night.” Andthere was evening, and there was morning—the first day.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  29. 29. many familiar phrases do have their English origin in this translation: “an eye for an eye” are both in Wycliffe, as are words such as “birthday,” “communication,” “crime,” “envy,” “frying-pen,” “injury,” “zeal,” - all these and many more were read first in Wycliffe’s Bible.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  30. 30. William Tyndale Like Wycliffe, Tyndale was an Oxford classical scholar. In 1535, Tyndale was arrested by church authorities and jailed in the castle of Vilvoorde outside Brussels for over a year. He was tried for heresy, strangled and burnt at the stake in 1536. The Tyndale Bible, as it was known, continued to play a key role in spreading Reformation ideas across Europe. The fifty-four independent scholars who created the King James Version of the bible in 1611 drew significantly on Tyndales translations. One estimation suggests the New Testament in the King James Version is 83% Tyndales, and the Old Testament 76%2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  31. 31. In the begynnynge God created heven and erth. The erth was voyde and emptic and darcknesse was vpon the depe and the spirite of God moved vpon the water. Then God sayd; let there be lyghte and there was lyghte. In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth. Now the earth was formless and empty, darkness was over the surface of the deep, and the Spirit of God was hovering over the waters. And God said, “Let there be light,” and there was light. 4 God saw that the light was good, and he separated the light from the darkness.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  32. 32. In the bigynnyng God made of nouyt heuene and erthe. Forsothe the erthe was idel and voide, and derknessis weren on the face of depthe; and the Spiryt of the Lord was borun on the watris. And God seide, Liyt be maad, and liyt was maad. In the begynnynge God created heven and erth. The erth was voyde and emptic and darcknesse was vpon the depe and the spirite of God moved vpon the water. Then God sayd; let there be lyghte and there was lyghte.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  33. 33. Elizabeth 12011년 5월 13일 금요일
  34. 34. Elizabeth 1 My loving people, we have been perswaded by some, that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit our self to armed multitudes for fear of treachery: but I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful, and loving people. Let Tyrants fear, I have always so behaved my self, that under God I have placed my chiefest strength, and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects. And therefore I am come amongst you as you see, at this time, not for my recreation, and disport, but being resolved, in the midst, and heat of the battaile to live, or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my Honour, and my blood even in the dust. I know I have the bodie, but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and Stomach of a King, and a King of England too. . . We shall shortly have a famous victorie over those enemies of my God, of my Kingdomes, and of my People.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  35. 35. Elizabeth 1 My loving people, we have been perswaded by some, that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit our self to armed multitudes for fear of treachery: but I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful, and loving people. Let Tyrants fear, I have always so behaved my self, that under God I have placed my chiefest strength, and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects. And therefore I am come amongst you as you see, at this time, not for my recreation, and disport, but being resolved, in the midst, and heat of the battaile to live, or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my Honour, and my blood even in the dust. I know I have the bodie, but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and Stomach of a King, and a King of England too. . . We shall shortly have a famous victorie over those enemies of my God, of my Kingdomes, and of my People.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  36. 36. Elizabeth 1 My loving people, we have been perswaded by some, that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit our self to armed multitudes for fear of treachery: but I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful, and loving people. Let Tyrants fear, I have always so behaved my self, that under God I have placed my chiefest strength, and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects. And therefore I am come amongst you as you see, at this time, not for my recreation, and disport, but being resolved, in the midst, and heat of the battaile to live, or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my Honour, and my blood even in the dust. I know I have the bodie, but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and Stomach of a King, and a King of England too. . . We shall shortly have a famous victorie over those enemies of my God, of my Kingdomes, and of my People.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  37. 37. Elizabeth 1 My loving people, we have been perswaded by some, that are careful of our safety, to take heed how we commit our self to armed multitudes for fear of treachery: but I assure you, I do not desire to live to distrust my faithful, and loving people. Let Tyrants fear, I have always so behaved my self, that under God I have placed my chiefest strength, and safeguard in the loyal hearts and good will of my subjects. And therefore I am come amongst you as you see, at this time, not for my recreation, and disport, but being resolved, in the midst, and heat of the battaile to live, or die amongst you all, to lay down for my God, and for my kingdom, and for my people, my Honour, and my blood even in the dust. I know I have the bodie, but of a weak and feeble woman, but I have the heart and Stomach of a King, and a King of England too. . . We http://www.youtube.com/watch? shall shortlyv=vITxj7Tq4f4&feature=related have a famous victorie over those enemies of my God, of my Kingdomes, and of my People.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  38. 38. William Shakespeare William Shakespeare was an English poet and playwright, widely regarded as the greatest writer in the English language and the worlds pre-eminent dramatist. He is often called Englands national poet. His surviving works, including some collaborations, consist of about 38plays, 154 sonnets, two long narrative poems, and several other poems.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  39. 39. 18 Shall I compare thee to a summer’s day? Thou art more lovely and more temperate: Rough winds do shake the darling buds of may, And summer’s lease hath all too short a date: Sometime too hot the eye of heaven shines, And often is his gold complexion dimm’d. And every fair from fair sometime declines, By chance, or nature’s changing course untrimm’d But thy eternal summer shall not fade. Nor lose possession of that fair thou ow’st; Nor shall Death brag thou wander’st in his shade, When in eternal lines to time thou grow’st; So long as men can breathe, or eyes can see, So long lives this, and this gives life to thee.2011년 5월 13일 금요일
  40. 40. Thank You for listening2011년 5월 13일 금요일

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