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Accommodations and Modifications<br />for Subject Teachers with English Language Learners<br />Slides by: Sylvia Gonsalves...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Program Adaptations<br />To support the literacy needs of English Language Lea...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Program Adaptations<br />The Ministry of Education acknowledges that students ...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodations are strategies and provisions provided by the teacher to help t...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Modifications are adjustments to the curriculum expectations and are made for ...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodations <br />Clarify Instructions<br />Provide a Glossary<br />Adjust ...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodation #1: Clarify Instructions<br />WHAT<br />Simplify vocabulary<br /...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Example<br />Original Question:<br />Which one of the following series of word...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodation #2: Provide a Glossary<br />WHAT<br />Provide a glossaryof diffi...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Glossary of Terms (Weather)<br />
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Providing a Glossary on Tests<br />WHAT<br />Provide a glossary of difficult v...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Example<br />1. A moraine is <br />(a) an elevated, flat area or plateau<br />...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodation #3:Adjust Format<br />WHAT<br />Maintain the same sentence struc...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodation:<br />What to do if you are absent<br />You should:<br />Tell yo...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br /># 1 Word Problems in Science<br />Possible Accommodations<br />Examples for:<b...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Word Problems in Science<br />Original Question<br />A gem dealer is presented...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Possible Accommodations<br />Reformat the question<br />Read the question alou...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodations for ESLEO<br />	WHY<br />Provides more space for first language...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Example #1: ESLEO<br />A gem dealer is presented with three red stones, X, Y a...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodations for ESLCO<br />WHY<br />The word gemologist has no impact on th...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Example # 2: ESLCO<br />There are three stones, X, Y and Z. They may be rubies...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodations for ESLBO<br />WHAT<br />Write the question first<br />Write in...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Example # 3: ESLBO<br />Which of the three stones are rubies?<br />three red s...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br /># 2 Word Problems in Math<br />Possible Accommodations<br />Examples for:<br /...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Word Problems in Math<br />Original Question<br />Two Search and Rescue ships ...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Possible Accommodations<br />Read the paragraph aloud to the students <br />Em...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodations for ESL C, D, E<br />ACCOMODATION<br />Two Search and Rescue sh...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodations for ESL B, C, D<br />ACCOMODATION<br />Two ships, Ship 1 and Sh...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Accommodations for ESL A, B, C<br />ACCOMODATION <br />AND<br />MODIFICATION<b...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Expectations & Evaluation<br />TWO MATH EXPECTATIONS BEING ADDRESSED:<br />Cal...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007  <br />Adaptations and the Report Card<br />Indicate that modifications are made by:<...
Sylvia Gonsalves <br />AMHS, February 2007  <br />Primary Source:<br />Accommodations and Modifications:<br />A Working Ha...
Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS, February 2007  <br />Thank you…<br />For attending this presentation!<br />
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Accommodations and Modifications:


A Working Handbook for Subject Teachers with English Language Learners, 2006

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Accommodations New

  1. 1. Accommodations and Modifications<br />for Subject Teachers with English Language Learners<br />Slides by: Sylvia Gonsalves<br />Alexander Mackenzie H.S., YRDSB<br />
  2. 2. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Program Adaptations<br />To support the literacy needs of English Language Learners, teachers are required by the Ministry of Education to make the necessary adaptations (accommodations and/or modifications) to their programs. <br />The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 to 12: Program Planning and Assessment, 2000 (10).<br />
  3. 3. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Program Adaptations<br />The Ministry of Education acknowledges that students who are receiving modifications are still working towards a credit.<br />The Ontario Curriculum, Grades 9 to 12: English as a Second Language and English Literacy Development, (8–9).<br />
  4. 4. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodations are strategies and provisions provided by the teacher to help the student meet the expectations of a course. Some examples of accommodations include: providing extra time, adjusting instructional language, allowing dictionaries and using graphic organizers. <br />strategies and provisions<br />Accommodations & Modifications<br />Accommodations<br />
  5. 5. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Modifications are adjustments to the curriculum expectations and are made for some or all of the course expectations, based upon the student’slevel of English proficiency. <br />adjustments to the curriculum expectations<br />Accommodations & Modifications<br />Modifications<br />
  6. 6. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodations <br />Clarify Instructions<br />Provide a Glossary<br />Adjust Format<br />
  7. 7. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodation #1: Clarify Instructions<br />WHAT<br />Simplify vocabulary<br />Simplify instructions (less words; simpler construction)<br />Bold key words in questions<br /> WHY<br />Helps students comprehend content<br />Helps students understand what to do<br />Helps students focus on what is being asked <br />Accommodation #1<br />
  8. 8. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Example<br />Original Question:<br />Which one of the following series of words best describes the Appalachian Region?<br />ice-covered, flat lowlands<br />high, young, peaked mountains<br />coastal plain, muskeg<br />worn down, old, rounded mountains<br />Accommodation:<br />II. Which best describes the Appalachian Region?<br />ice-covered, flat lowlands<br />high, young, peaked mountains<br />coastal plain, muskeg<br />old, rounded mountains<br />
  9. 9. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodation #2: Provide a Glossary<br />WHAT<br />Provide a glossaryof difficult words before unit<br />Provide a glossaryfor review & tests<br />Underline glossary words in questions/ handouts <br /> WHY<br />Helps students focus on essential terms<br />Helps students comprehend content<br />Indicates to students that the unfamiliar term is explained <br />Accommodation #2<br />
  10. 10. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Glossary of Terms (Weather)<br />
  11. 11. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Providing a Glossary on Tests<br />WHAT<br />Provide a glossary of difficult vocabulary<br />Place a glossary at the end of the test on a separate sheet of paper<br />Give students a glossary in advance to study at home and bring into the test <br />WHY<br />While the glossary is not a list of the terminology being tested, it does simplify the language.<br />Students can tear off the glossary page and use it efficiently as they work through the test<br />Helps students learn words and phrases used on the test <br />
  12. 12. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Example<br />1. A moraine is <br />(a) an elevated, flat area or plateau<br />(b) a ridge or hill of glacial till<br />(c) the bottom of a river valley<br />(d) another name for glacial valleys<br />That was easy . . .<br />GLOSSARY of terms<br />elevated: raised up in the air; high<br />till: sand and gravel<br />
  13. 13. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodation #3:Adjust Format<br />WHAT<br />Maintain the same sentence structure throughout<br />Increase spacing<br />Chunk related information together in a chart format <br />WHY<br />Reduces level of reading complexity<br />Reduces density of text and provides space for first language translation and student notes<br />Helps students understand the relationship between pieces of key information <br />Accommodation #3<br />
  14. 14. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodation:<br />What to do if you are absent<br />You should:<br />Tell your teacher when you will be away.<br />Bring a note from your parents/ guardians or tell them to call Attendance Office (905) 884-0554.<br />Bring an admit slip to class from the office.<br />Finish missed work.<br />Example<br />Original:<br />WHAT YOU SHOULD KNOW ABOUT ATTENDANCE<br />If you know you will be absent, inform your teacher prior to the day.<br />All absences must be authorized with a note or phone call to the attendance office.<br />You must authorize your absences with your teacher by presenting an admit slip upon your return.<br />You must complete an assignment for every 3 absences.<br />Accommodation:<br />
  15. 15. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br /># 1 Word Problems in Science<br />Possible Accommodations<br />Examples for:<br />ESL EO<br />ESL CO<br />ESL BO<br />Nothing like the<br />wonder of SCIENCE<br />
  16. 16. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Word Problems in Science<br />Original Question<br />A gem dealer is presented with three red stones, X, Y and Z, and told that they are rubies. He knows that rubies have a density range of between 3950kg/m³and 4100 kg/m³. He is also able to mix different liquids to obtain a liquid, A, with a density of 3950 kg/m³ , and another liquid, B, with a density of 4100 kg/m³ . After experimenting, the gemologist finds that in liquid A, Z floats, while X and Y sink. In liquid B, Y sinks, while X and Z float. Can you determine which stones are real rubies and which stones are fake?<br />
  17. 17. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Possible Accommodations<br />Reformat the question<br />Read the question aloud to the student & stress the important words<br />Explain unfamiliar words<br />Bold the question <br />Eliminate unnecessary vocabulary<br />Chunk the information into three distinct paragraphs<br />Highlight variables and key concepts<br />Write the question first<br />Write information in point form<br />Put the information in a graphic organizer (chart)<br />Highlight headings<br />Sequence process<br />Provide space for work and blanks for answers<br />
  18. 18. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodations for ESLEO<br /> WHY<br />Provides more space for first language translation <br />Reading aloud helps students get the main idea <br />Stress helps students focus on the key words and the task <br />Provides context; for example, students may not know what a gem dealer is<br />Helps students focus<br />WHAT<br />Reformat the question<br />Read the question aloud to the students<br />Stress the important words<br />Explain unfamiliar words<br />Bold the question<br />Accommodation<br />
  19. 19. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Example #1: ESLEO<br />A gem dealer is presented with three red stones, X, Y and Z, and told that they are rubies. <br />He knows that rubies have a density range of between 3950kg/m³ and 4100 kg/m³. <br />He is also able to mix different liquids to obtain a liquid, A, with a density of 3950 kg/m³ , and another liquid, B, with a density of 4100 kg/m³ . <br />After experimenting, the gemologist finds that in liquid A, Z floats, while X and Y sink. In liquid B, Y sinks, while X and Z float.<br />Can you determine which stones are real rubies and which stones are fake?<br />
  20. 20. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodations for ESLCO<br />WHY<br />The word gemologist has no impact on the question and may present a barrier to understanding <br />Helps students sequence information in the question and organize their thoughts<br />Provides more space for first language translation of unfamiliar terms<br />Helps students pick out important information<br />WHAT<br />Eliminate unnecessary vocabulary<br />Chunk the information into three distinct paragraphs<br />Reformat the question<br />Highlight variables and key concepts<br />Accommodation<br />
  21. 21. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Example # 2: ESLCO<br />There are three stones, X, Y and Z. They may be rubies. Rubies have a density range of 3950 kg/m³ to 4100 kg/m³. <br />There are two liquids. Liquid A has a density of 3950 kg/m³.Liquid B has a density of 4100 kg/m³. <br />Each of the stones is put into liquid A and then into liquid B. In liquidA, stone X sinks, and stone Y sinks, too. StoneZfloats. In liquidB, stone X floats, stone Y sinks and stone Zfloats. <br />Which stones are rubies?<br />
  22. 22. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodations for ESLBO<br />WHAT<br />Write the question first<br />Write information in point form<br />Highlight variables<br />WHY<br />Provides a purpose for reading <br />Eliminates excess information and provides one idea per line<br />Helps students organize information <br />Accommodation<br />
  23. 23. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Example # 3: ESLBO<br />Which of the three stones are rubies?<br />three red stones: X, Y, and Z<br />density of rubies: 3950 kg/m³ - 4100 kg/m³<br />density of liquid A= 3950 kg/m³<br />density of liquid B= 4100 kg/m³<br />in liquid A: X sinks, Y sinks, Z floats<br />in liquid B: X floats, Y sinks, Z floats<br />Moving on<br />
  24. 24. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br /># 2 Word Problems in Math<br />Possible Accommodations<br />Examples for:<br />ESLC/D/E<br />ESLB/C/D<br />ESLA/B<br />Identify the equation . . .<br />That was easy . . .<br />Y = mX + b?<br />
  25. 25. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Word Problems in Math<br />Original Question<br />Two Search and Rescue ships are out at sea looking for a downed aircraft. The two ships, SR1 and SR2, are 108 km apart. SR1 picks up a signal from the downed aircraft and estimates that it is 95 km away. SR1 calculates that the angle between the line of sight from SR1 to SR2 and the line from SR1 to the downed aircraft is 36°. Determine who is closer to the downed aircraft, SR1 or SR2.<br />
  26. 26. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Possible Accommodations<br />Read the paragraph aloud to the students <br />Emphasize key words <br />Highlight key words<br />Simplify the vocabulary<br />Eliminate unnecessary words<br />Reformat the question <br />Provide a labeled diagram<br />
  27. 27. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodations for ESL C, D, E<br />ACCOMODATION<br />Two Search and Rescue ships are out at sea looking for a downed aircraft. The two ships, SR1 and SR2, are 108 km apart. SR1 picks up a signal from the downed aircraft and estimates that it is 95 km away. SR1 calculates that the anglebetween the line of sight from SR1 to SR2 and the line from SR1 to the downed aircraft is 36°. Determine who is closer to the downed aircraft SR1 or SR2.<br />
  28. 28. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodations for ESL B, C, D<br />ACCOMODATION<br />Two ships, Ship 1 and Ship 2, are 108 km apart. <br />Ship 1 is 95 km away from an airplane.<br />The angle for Ship 1, between the line to Ship 2 and the line to the airplane is 36°.<br />Which ship is closer to the airplane – Ship 1 or Ship 2?<br />
  29. 29. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Accommodations for ESL A, B, C<br />ACCOMODATION <br />AND<br />MODIFICATION<br />Ship 1<br />This ain't rocket science . . .<br />36°<br />95 km<br />108 km<br />Airplane<br />Ship 2<br />Which ship is closer to the airplane? Prove your answer.<br />
  30. 30. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Expectations & Evaluation<br />TWO MATH EXPECTATIONS BEING ADDRESSED:<br />Calculate the measures of sides and angles in acute triangles, using the sine law and cosine law.<br />Solve problems involving the measures of sides and angles in acute triangles.<br />All examples meet #1<br />Example 3 does NOT meet Expectation # 2<br />EVALUATION <br />Examples 1&2 (ACCOMMODATION)<br />Students are evaluated on both expectations.<br />Example 3 (MODIFICATION)<br />Students are evaluated only on #1.<br />As the students’ English language proficiency increases, the be second expectation can evaluated (most recent).<br />
  31. 31. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS February 2007 <br />Adaptations and the Report Card<br />Indicate that modifications are made by:<br />Checking the ESL or ELD box according to the designation of the learner as ESL or ELD.<br />Inserting the code: 8657<br />“Adaptations have been made to support ESL/ELD learners.”<br />Do not check the box if only accommodations are made.<br />
  32. 32. Sylvia Gonsalves <br />AMHS, February 2007 <br />Primary Source:<br />Accommodations and Modifications:<br />A Working Handbook for Subject Teachers with English Language Learners, 2006<br />
  33. 33. Sylvia Gonsalves, AMHS, February 2007 <br />Thank you…<br />For attending this presentation!<br />

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