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Positive behavior support

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A case study on positive behavior support. A way for classroom management in urban school settings.

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Positive behavior support

  1. 1. Case Study: Positive Behavior Support By: Sydelle Prosopio
  2. 2. Student Overview Miguel Rivera  Puerto  ESL Rico 1-2  6th-7th grade Previous Services  Pull out method was used on him.  Not accustomed to being in a classroom.
  3. 3.  One on one session  Completed work  Not many tangible incentives were given  Two more students were added to the class. A change in behavior • • • • • Poor behavior Instigated arguments Disengaged No longer provided work Disrespectful
  4. 4. Positive Behavior Support  Implement incentives for students during class.  In class praise  Tangible/Intangible items  Completed work=Candy/Chips/Cookies  Good behavior=Extra computer and music time at the end of class.
  5. 5. Quantitative/Qualitative Methods  Likes/Dislikes for treats  Behavior in previous school setting  Parent Input  Class interest  Checklists  Teacher behavior observation sheet
  6. 6. Target Behavior Target Behavior 2 1 (Excellent): (Okay): Completed and turned in assignments quietly and on time. Student was very respectful and followed directions Date 2/20/2014 2/21/2014 Target Behavior 3 (Poor): Student was not on task, responded in an inappropriate manner to redirection, and was disrespectful. Please refer to *NOTES. Staying on task, had to be redirected a few times. Student was respectful for the most part but would benefit from being more focused. 2 *NOTES 1 Participated and was well-behaved in class. 1 2/22/2014 2/23/2014 2/24/2014 1 2 1 2/25/2014 1 2 2 2/26/2014 1 2 1
  7. 7.  Checklist success  Motivation -computer use -cookies  Leader -helped peers -motivated class  Learner  Proud Results/Analysis
  8. 8. Discussions  Positive behavior support is effective.  Not only made him a leader, but he noticed the importance of completing his work even without the incentives.  There was a change within myself as well. -creating relationships -reflecting on teaching -stepping out of my comfort zone
  9. 9. References         Akey, T. (2006) School context, student attitudes and behavior, and academic achievement: An exploratory analysis-Building Knowledge to Improve Social Policy, 1-36. Retrieved from http://files.eric.ed.gov/fulltext/ED489760.pdf Anderson, C., Barnes A., Campbell, A., & Rodriguez, B.- (2013)- Effects of a tier 2 intervention on classroom disruptive behavior and academic engagement, Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, 7(1), 32-54. doi:10.3776/joci.2013.v7n1p32-54 Anderson, C. M., & Spaulding, S. S., (2007), Using positive behavior support to design effective classrooms, PBS in the Classroom, 16 (2), 27-31. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmc.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eue&AN=24377959&site=ehost-live Arter, P. (2007), The positive alternative learning supports program collaborating to improve student success, Supporting Secondary Students Council for Exceptional Children, 40 (1), 38-46. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmercyu.edu:3061/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=1e0a3657-9719-4f29-b0be-4a480a45a8d4%40sessionmgr4001&vid=1&hid=4209      Baker, S., K., Horner, R., H., & Preciado J., A., (2006) Using a Function-Based Approach to Decrease Problem Behaviors and Increase Academic Engagement for Latino English Language Learners, Function Based Approach to Decrease Problem Behaviors, 1-23. Retrieved from http://www.ocde.us/PBIS/Documents/Articles/Revised_ELLs_and_Problem_Behaviors.pdf Bloom, L. (2013) Providing Positive Behavioral Support for All Students, Journal of Curriculum and Instruction, 7 (1), 1-5. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmercyu.edu:3061/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=d46cd29d-f4a4-47a0-9886-0ae143d9b1b1%40sessionmgr4004&vid=1&hid=4209 Blum, C., & Cheney, D. (2009), The validity and reliability of the teacher knowledge and skills survey for positive behavior support, Teacher Education and Special Education: The Journal of the Teacher Education Division of the Council for Exceptional Children, 32 (3), 239-254. doi: 10.1177/0888406409340013    Bondy, E., & Ross, D. (2008), The teacher as warm demander, Educational Leadership, 66 (1), 54-58. Retrieved from http://www.ascd.org/publications/educational-leadership/sept08/vol66/num01/The-Teacher-as-Warm-Demander.aspx   Cambell-Whately, G., Khea, C., & McKinney, S., (2005), Managing student behavior in urban classrooms, The Role of Teacher ABC Assessments, 79 (1), 16-20. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmercyu.edu:3061/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=89fd413d-6a9b-447d-a2d2-26a23a7b43eb%40sessionmgr4004&vid=1&hid=4209   Fleischman, S., & Osher, D. (2005) Positive culture in urban schools, Research Matters Educational Leadership, 62 (6), 84-85. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmercyu.edu:3061/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=13c0fa1e-b027-4591-9b69-5d4e5514b3d8%40sessionmgr4001&vid=1&hid=4209   Gersten, R. & Ward, B., (2013) A Randomized Evaluation of the Safe and Civil Schools Model for Positive Behavioral Interventions and Supports at Elementary Schools in a Large Urban School District, Research Into Practice School Psychology Review, 42 (3), 317-333. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmercyu.edu:3061/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=9dc0653f-f009-4aa5-b8c1-262d4b89315b%40sessionmgr4001&vid=1&hid=4209   Hendly, S. (2007), 20 Ways to use positive behavior support for inclusion in the general education classroom, Intervention in School & Clinic, 42 (4), 225-228. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmercyu.edu:2189/ehost/delivery?sid=85d562c-98e-4b99-8ad0-1ded1e7bf738%40sessionmgr198&vid=9&hid=114   Kamps, D., Kravits, T., Stolze, J. & Swaggart, B., (1999), Prevention strategies for at-risk students and students with EBD in urban elementary schools, Journal of Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, 7 (3), 178-188. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmercyu.edu:3061/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=f15bf2f7-ce5f-4d91-afcf495cf179b26d%40sessionmgr4004&vid=1&hid=4209   Negron, M., Sugai, G., & Simonsen, B. (2008), Schoolwide Positive Behavior Supports Primary Systems and Practices, Teaching Exceptional Students Positive Behavior Interventions and Supports, 40 (6), 32-40. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmc.edu:2048/login?url=http://search.ebscohost.com/login.aspx?direct=true&db=eue&AN=508074243&site=ehost-live     Simonsen, B., Sugai, G. (2013), PBIS in alternative education settings: positive support for youth with high-risk behavior, Education and Treatment of Children, 36 (3), 3-14. Retrieved from http://libproxy.gmercyu.edu:3061/ehost/pdfviewer/pdfviewer?sid=58fd674b-342e-4d0d-84f6-7f289c9de680%40sessionmgr4003&vid=1&hid=4209

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