Understanding By Design Mar.12

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  • Shelley Pierlot Purpose: define Understanding by Design for you, why is it important to use this specific process, explain two components: big ideas, essential questions. Also, examine video example of a school division implementing UbD to implement curricula. Questions? Please feel free to use stickies for the Parking Lot
  • Understanding By Design Mar.12

    1. 1. Understanding by Design NESD Model for Curriculum Implementation Presented by DI Team March, 2009
    2. 2. What is Understanding by Design (UbD)? <ul><li>Unit-planning process </li></ul><ul><li>Created by Grant Wiggins and Jay McTighe </li></ul><ul><li>Known as “backwards design” </li></ul><ul><li>Begins with the end in mind </li></ul><ul><li>Beginning stages of UbD </li></ul>
    3. 3. Basic Stages of UbD <ul><li>Stage 1:Identify desired results </li></ul><ul><li>Curriculum Goals and Learner Outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Big Ideas </li></ul><ul><li>Essential Questions/ Enduring Understandings </li></ul><ul><li>Know/ Understand/ Do </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 2: Determine acceptable evidence </li></ul><ul><li>Formative/Summative Assessments </li></ul><ul><li>Stage 3: Plan learning experiences and instruction </li></ul><ul><li>Developing the Learning Plan </li></ul><ul><li>Consider how to differentiate </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Stages of Backward Design </li></ul>
    5. 5. Curriculum Actualization <ul><li>UbD requires teachers to examine curriculum to align the learning plan/assessment with provincial expectations </li></ul><ul><li>UbD leads students and teachers to higher level of thinking and inquiry </li></ul><ul><li>Links assessment directly to learning outcomes </li></ul>
    6. 6. <ul><li>Establishing Curricular Priorities </li></ul>
    7. 7. Meeting the Learner Needs <ul><li>Invites us to attend to the child </li></ul><ul><li>Allows for scaffolding for students </li></ul><ul><li>Clarifies outcomes that all children are expected to learn </li></ul><ul><li>Clarifies what students need to understand, know, do </li></ul>
    8. 8. The How-to’s of UbD <ul><li>Categories within the process are most important </li></ul><ul><li>Many entry points </li></ul><ul><li>UbD takes time to do well </li></ul><ul><li>Units are often revised as teachers reflect on effectiveness </li></ul><ul><li>Process may guided by organizer use </li></ul>
    9. 9. Big Ideas <ul><li>Invite higher levels of thinking </li></ul><ul><li>Requires uncovering throughout the unit </li></ul><ul><li>Transfers across grades or subject areas </li></ul><ul><li>‘ A big idea is a way of usefully seeing connections, not just another piece of knowledge…..it is more like a theme than the facts of a story.’ (Grant Wiggins, 2007) </li></ul>
    10. 10. Essential Questions/Enduring Understandings <ul><li>Stimulates thought, provokes inquiry, and generates questions </li></ul><ul><li>Interdisciplinary – invites you to transfer and apply learning </li></ul><ul><li>Links to curriculum </li></ul>
    11. 11. <ul><li>‘ They require new thought rather than the mere collection of facts, second-hand opinions, or “cut-and-paste” thinking…many of us believe that schools should devote more time to essential questions and less time to Trivial Pursuit.’ (Jamie McKenzie, 2008) </li></ul>

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