Building the Collection
Permanent Collection Vision <ul><li>Geo-galleries: every country in the world </li></ul><ul><li>Exhibits: multiple exhibit...
 
Permanent Collections <ul><li>Scope: Rethinking the collection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Traditional acquisition guidelines </...
 
 
 
Acquisition Process <ul><li>Wish list for “virtual” exhibits </li></ul><ul><li>Curators, consultants, and sub-consultants ...
The Unknown and the Known <ul><li>No provenance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Selmer saxophone, Vichy auction (France, 1950s) </li...
 
 
Challenges <ul><li>Global scope </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access to remote, restricted, and unsafe areas </li></ul></ul><ul><u...
Lessons Learned <ul><li>Scope </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Change is good </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Procedure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>...
Next Steps <ul><li>Phase 2 wish list </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Filling gaps in the collections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Repl...
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MIM Building the Collection

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  • 2. 3. * Focusing on permanent collection musical instruments. Ideally we would acquire regalia, AV, and images in tandem with musical instruments and regalia. But other times separate. * Not discussing donations and loans.
  • Multiple exhibit components - Musical instruments framed - Contextual - Regalia, masks, decorative arts, furniture - AV - Images - Text and object labels * Presentation focuses on permanent collection of musical instruments. Ideally we would acquire regalia, AV, and images in tandem with musical instruments and regalia. But other times separate. * Not discussing donations and loans.
  • Traditional guidlelines: historical; technological; aesthetic; social; spiritual Objects more than 50 years old Associations with known makers and players Here images of traditional acquisitions: musical instruments as art objects, collector items, and western classical music
  • - MIM’s new ground: Global scope; everyday objects; folk traditions and living traditions
  • Reproductions: other museum collections. Often rarity: octobasse
  • Procedure: Rethinking the acquisition process Challenge: Managing the ambitious time frame - “virtual” exhibits were both place to start for acquisitions and design. For acquisitions., it was basically a shopping list to make initial inquiries. 1. Acquisition process varies by region, need. 2. Some existing, some new relationships 3. Makers: both existing and commissioned objects
  • Selmer Mark VI, tenor saxophone (pic next slide). Vichy Auction Dec. 2008. Reliance on research and as ex. Of a particular desired model. Certain collections, in a number of cases a) we might know who collected it where and when, but not much else (same with Grémaux/Balkans and Kilpatrick/Asia); in one exception b) Fiske: was well-researched (archives, though in disorder with both acquisition and research documents). Collections as well as the objects themselves have a history. Zampogna, Italy (pic next slide). Our consultant worked with musicians in the field.
  • Challenges all resulting from positive aspects of the project 1. wish list: subject to market and traditions Peru, 2 instruments and costume used in Scissor’s Dance: from Los Danzaq de Ayacucho, the most famous group performing this dance. Malena: “These are all initiated instruments, also the costume. A little bit like the Cuban story, the Peruvian instruments only can be used by their owners/performers. It was necessary to get permission from the shrine where they were initiated in order to acquire them. The musicians (harp and violin players) and the dancer, were convinced by my anthropologist friend whom they knew well because he has published about this dance and had worked with them, somebody they trusted, convinced them that, if they agreed to sell their own initiated instruments, their art would be shared by many people.” 3. Time: availability; limited available resources: permissions, access/research; logistics
  • 3. Time: we doubled our acquisition goal ½-way through. Raising the bar to make an ambitious goal led to the making of a great start – a collection with diversity and breadth that will attract other donations and loans.
  • Possible questions: How did you determine what was a country? How did these acquisitions relate to the education collection? Are there opportunities for guests to play instruments? (Experience Gallery) 3) Policy re: playing the collection (Some instruments acquired with this in mind)
  • MIM Building the Collection

    1. 1. Building the Collection
    2. 2. Permanent Collection Vision <ul><li>Geo-galleries: every country in the world </li></ul><ul><li>Exhibits: multiple exhibit components </li></ul><ul><li>Instruments are single component of exhibits </li></ul>
    3. 4. Permanent Collections <ul><li>Scope: Rethinking the collection </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Traditional acquisition guidelines </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Adding new diversity & breadth </li></ul></ul>
    4. 8. Acquisition Process <ul><li>Wish list for “virtual” exhibits </li></ul><ul><li>Curators, consultants, and sub-consultants </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Travel and foreign colleagues </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Other resources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Networking with embassies, museums, scholars </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Sources </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Large existing collections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Collectors, dealers, auctions </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Makers, Musicians </li></ul></ul>
    5. 9. The Unknown and the Known <ul><li>No provenance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Selmer saxophone, Vichy auction (France, 1950s) </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Limited provenance </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Gérard Copperé Collection, France, c. 1970-2000 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Fiske Collection, Claremont College, 20 th c. </li></ul></ul><ul><li>In the field </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Zampogna, Italy, 2009 </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Scissors dance, Peru, 2009 </li></ul></ul>
    6. 12. Challenges <ul><li>Global scope </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Access to remote, restricted, and unsafe areas </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Availability vs. wish list </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Cultural sensitivity and permissions </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Exhibit-minded acquisitions </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Ensembles </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Redundancy </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Relationship to narrative and other components </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Resources: facility, research tools, TMS, time </li></ul>
    7. 13. Lessons Learned <ul><li>Scope </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Change is good </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Procedure </li></ul><ul><ul><li>More research up front </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Manage consultants entirely </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Network early and often </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Large collections are a mixed blessing </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>No replacement for field work </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Time </li></ul>
    8. 14. Next Steps <ul><li>Phase 2 wish list </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Filling gaps in the collections </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Replacing place-holders </li></ul></ul><ul><li>Research and record clean-up </li></ul><ul><li>Devising classification system </li></ul><ul><li>Reviewing relationship to exhibit narratives </li></ul>

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