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Best of Dubai vol 2

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Showcasing the Best of Dubai in tourism, hospitality, lifestyle and business

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Best of Dubai vol 2

  1. 1. V o l u m e 2 DUBAIAND THE NORTHERN EMIRATES B E S T O F
  2. 2. Inside White Page_L1.qxp 12/6/06 8:52 PM Page 4
  3. 3. This past year has been a time for Dubai to celebrate the era of diversified progress that economic growth and heightened development has fostered in all spheres. It is also a time for the emirate and its people to consolidate the rapid pace of change so that the impressive socio-economic indicators remain strong, persistently forging ahead to embrace fresh regional and global potentials. Conveying this inexorable human capital, the second volume of 'Best of Dubai' is a testament to the dedication and innovative zeal of all the men and women that underscore the business successes of Dubai. We trace their individual stories as they reinforce the foundations of an emirate that stands as a role model of excellence in the Middle East. Building on their progress in dedicated chapters, we deepen our scope in the discovery of new companies, people and lifestyles that weave together to create a colourfully exciting multi-cultural fabric of society. Together we aim to continue our mission to inspire, in a positive scenario that extends worldwide. This yearly publication viewed as an elegant access to business, tourism and lifestyles, is part of the 'Global Village Partnerships' publishing model that now extends across 20 countries with a further 130 on the anvil. Our editorial model is simple and is proving to be incisive. Through the illustration of companies in different sectors making innovative contributions underscored by powerful branding and effective corporate social responsibility, participants showcased plug into a vast global readership that is leveraged through a niche distribution extended worldwide. To complement the readership of our print model we have developed www.globalvillageproduct.com where all our publications can be viewed and downloaded online. With each edition, 'Best of Dubai' will continue to tell stories, drawing on the visions, missions and strategies of individuals and companies that represent the dynamics of an emirate in transition. In these pages, readers will gain perception into how these vital stakeholders, large and small, are collaborating together to ensure a better Dubai, a better Region and ultimately, a better world. 'If history repeats itself, then we are in for an excellent future'. International Group Publisher Sven Boermeester Publisher & Managing Group Editor Lisa Durante CEO Majdi Ali Production & Design Manager Luisa SDC Williams Regional Director Matt Davis Sales & Marketing Director Alenoosh Mirzakhanian Media Consultants Jocelyn Chidiac Lara Faraj Nadia Al Sheikh Printing Emirates Printing Press Creative Director Ravi Handve Administration Sharon Rosales Contributors Sophie Neil Geoff King Rita Kelaita Jane Meikle Muskan Ohri Loft Office 1, Entrance- C, Office 209, Dubai Media City, Dubai, U.A.E. Tel. No.: +971 4 3671039 Fax No.: +971 4 3672505 Email Matt@o2oGroup.com Lisa@o2oGroup.com Website www.GlobalVillageProduct.com Published by One2One Publishing a division of One2One Group FZ LLC ISBN # 1-904566-78-2 Every effort has been made to ensure the accuracy of the information in the Best of Dubai vol.1 publication. Neither Best of Dubai nor One2One Publishing FZ LLC take any responsibility for errors or omissions. All rights reserved: No part of this publication shall be reproduced, copied, transmitted, adapted or modified in any form or by any means. This publication shall not be stored in whole or in part in any form in any retrieval system. Best of Dubai 3
  4. 4. 4 Best of Dubai Contents Best of Dubai ChapterPg24-47 Hotels & Hospitality ChapterPg50-75 Fine Dining ChapterPg78-87 Casual Dining ChapterPg90-103Travel, Tours & Leisure ChapterPg106-117 Mall DesitnationsChapterPg120-125 Fashion & Jewellery ChapterPg128-135 Luxury Lifestyles ChapterPg138-151 Design & Interiors ChapterPg154-163 Health & Beauty ChapterPg166-195 Young People ChapterPg198-205 Corporate Profiles ChapterPg208-229 Banking & Finance ChapterPg232-243 Architecture, Property & Real Estate ChapterPg246-275 Construction & Engineering ChapterPg278-281 Technology ChapterPg284-289 Food & Beverage ChapterPg292-299 The Arts & Media ChapterPg302-325 Training & Education ChapterPg328-345 Setting Up in Dubai ChapterPg348-359 Best of Dubai 5
  5. 5. 4 Best of Dubai Contents Best of Dubai ChapterPg24-47 Hotels & Hospitality ChapterPg50-75 Fine Dining ChapterPg78-87 Casual Dining ChapterPg90-103Travel, Tours & Leisure ChapterPg106-117 Mall DesitnationsChapterPg120-125 Fashion & Jewellery ChapterPg128-135 Luxury Lifestyles ChapterPg138-151 Design & Interiors ChapterPg154-163 Health & Beauty ChapterPg166-195 Young People ChapterPg198-205 Corporate Profiles ChapterPg208-229 Banking & Finance ChapterPg232-243 Architecture, Property & Real Estate ChapterPg246-275 Construction & Engineering ChapterPg278-281 Technology ChapterPg284-289 Food & Beverage ChapterPg292-299 The Arts & Media ChapterPg302-325 Training & Education ChapterPg328-345 Setting Up in Dubai ChapterPg348-359 Best of Dubai 5
  6. 6. CHAPTER 1 Best of Dubai "Waiting has never been our choice in the past, nor is it in the present. We are always striving, anticipating the future and preparing for it". Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE Vice President, Prime Minister & Ruler of Dubai
  7. 7. CHAPTER 1 Best of Dubai "Waiting has never been our choice in the past, nor is it in the present. We are always striving, anticipating the future and preparing for it". Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, UAE Vice President, Prime Minister & Ruler of Dubai
  8. 8. Creek Life 24 Best of Dubai BestofDubai IT would be easy to presume that this impressive entry on to the world stage has been funded by oil money, but that's not the case. Oil revenues amount to less than six percent of the emirate's income. Historically, Dubai was a trading post between East Asia and Europe, with a history of pearl diving, commerce ensconced in a Bedouin heritage. Thanks to the astuteness of its rulers - the Maktoum dynasty founded in 1833 - combined with favourable geopolitical conditions, it is regaining that role on a grander scale. Positioning itself at the crossroads of continents and economies, the modest oil reserves discovered in the 1960s, were cannily invested by Sheikh Mohammed's father, Sheikh Rashid, to upgrade Dubai's port facilities and free-trade amenities. This has resulted in a location sufficiently liberal to attract western corporations and tourists, but Islamic enough to attract Arab money too. With the can-do attitude and feudal might of Sheikh Mohammed, the mission persists. Elevating the concept of cluster economies to an art that is reaping vast dividends, to attract more IT companies, he commissioned a technology zone called Internet City. To compete as a broadcasting centre, Media City was developed, and to place Dubai as a financial stop-over on the daily global trading cycle between London and Hong Kong, a mammoth Dubai International Finance Centre - a business district larger than Canary Wharf - is already capitalising from its world class legal and regulatory frame work to attract financial institutions keen to position themselves in this region immersed in oil wealth and the trillions of dollars that have been repatriated from the US since 9/11. Loved by his subjects and respected by Dubai's expatriate population that forms 80 per cent of the emirate's 1.2 million population. Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Prime Minister and Vice President of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai is an avid horse racing patron, and a champion endurance horse racer with numerous world titles to his name. As the self avowed chairman of what is referred to as 'Dubai Inc.', his innovative moves based on fostering a knowledge economy, have propelled Dubai into pole position regionally. What is perceived as the successful Dubai model has inspired neighbouring countries in dire need of economic diversification from oil related revenues and job creation for the burgeoning demographic explosion of under 25's to replicate his concepts in free zone development, tourism infrastructure initiatives and property ownership for foreigners. Zany real estate projects notwithstanding, Dubai has worked tirelessly to develop its infrastructure of transport facilities, schools, hospitals, tourism developments - the hallmarks of an advanced society. Today Dubai's transition from a small fishing and trading community into the global economy fray represents a parable of remarkable urban development and economic diversification. Thanks to the bold exploitation of unique niches, the strengthening of weak links and aggressive pursuit of iconic or at least record breaking architecture, the emirate has upped its regional profile and kudos worldwide. HRH Princess Haya Bint Al Hussein, wife of HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum with his sons, their Highnesses Hamdan, Rashid and Maktoum Trade Foundation.qxp 12/11/06 1:06 PM Page 1
  9. 9. that industrious approach is definitely paying dividends. In 2005, Dubai's economy grew around 16 per cent to an estimated US$37 billion, with non-oil GDP increasing by 14.92 percent. This illustrates the fabulous success of the emirate's diversification programme, which has been a central plank of government policy since the 1980s. Despite the visionary projects and never-ending expansion that characterise Dubai, the links with the past remain strong. The UAE is conservative, and is one of the last Gulf States to broaden the participation in the political process. Scratching the surface beneath the gleaming edifices that epitomise the emirate's high standards of living, westernized mores and flourishing economy, a parallel system and population from Iran and South Asia control traditional trading on the banks of Dubai's Creek. This legendary waterway crossing Dubai has been a vital part of Dubai's trading past; shaping the city from a flourishing fishing and pearl diving centre to international port in one the fastest developing cities of the world. The Creek remains a hive of activity since time immemorial, with dhows still plying ancient trade routes to Iran, India and East Africa. It is the symbol of how tradition can coexist with modernity and prosper despite the manic pace of change. There is no doubt that this traditional commercial trading model that Dubai's economy was based on is still thriving alongside the new genre of economic model - the knowledge economy, now taking shape. Best of Dubai 25 HH, the late Sheikh Maktoum Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum and HH Sheikh Hamdan Bin Rashid Al Maktoum HH, the late Sheikh Rashid Bin Saeed Al Maktoum Trade Foundation.qxp 12/11/06 1:06 PM Page 2
  10. 10. With development in Dubai racing ahead at break- neck speed, what factors ensure that Business Bay will deserve the recognition and sustainability you have envisaged? "Business Bay has been planned as a mixed-use urban development, which offers the best design strategy for combining housing, employment, retail, cultural, and recreational activities in a people-friendly environment, creating dynamic, attractive neighbourhoods and communities". With the development of Business Bay marking the first concrete initiative to create a new commercial epicentre, are there more plans to increase the existence of additional commercial hubs, which by extension will enhance Dubai's role as a 'city at the crossroads of continents and economies'? "Dubai's economy is diversifying and the reliance on non-oil sectors means that the enhancement of existing commercial centres as well as the development of more commercial enterprises is inevitable. The World Bank has ranked the UAE 69th worldwide in terms of cost of doing business in 2005, higher than many other Middle East and North African countries. It also takes less time comparatively to secure property rights in the UAE - three steps and nine days to register property in Dubai compared with three steps and 52.2 days in MENA. Thus the UAE's competitiveness continues to attract investors, thereby necessitating the need to constantly improve our commercial centres and the associated facilities. At the same time, this eventually enhances Dubai's role as an important financial, trade and manufacturing hub in the world". With the desire to draw comparisons to Business Bay and other architectural and engineering achievements worldwide, what country or existing architectural feat would you say most inspired the concept behind the project and why? "Business Bay is inspired by the great financial centres of our time. However, successful urban environments are not just an emulation of other cities. With Business Bay, through its architectural and commercial achievements, our intention is to provide international executives and investors with another world-class commercial centre that provides something in addition to existing hubs". Can you define what Business Bay will mean for Dubai and for the architectural and commercial world as a whole and how will this add to reshaping the future of commerce in the region? "Business Bay will be to Dubai what Manhattan is to New York or Ginza is to Tokyo. It will provide the best possible commercial environment to world-class companies, international investors and multinational businesses. Our aim is to create a distinct personality for Dubai and its business heritage through architectural achievements, new market trends and bustling, self-sufficient urban environments that adopt international business practice with the Middle East touch". Given the fact that you are so involved in the fabric of Dubai's infrastructure and society, where would you like to see Dubai within ten years in terms of its international real estate development? "Dubai enjoys a good reputation in the international community, and that is mainly in part due to the efforts of its progressive government. At the same time, we hope to see more legislation and initiatives from the public and private sectors that will facilitate Dubai's growth beyond this region. In terms of real estate development, there are already a lot of projects under planning or in progress that will add to the value of this city, precipitating constant change in the infrastructure and society. Within ten years, we hope to see Dubai at the same level as the most advanced cities in the world". What makes an area particularly suited to mixed-use tenancy structures? "Mixed-use projects are a sophisticated trend that offers smart growth to the retail industry, bringing greater lifestyle convenience to communities. Facilities such as gardens, parkways, waterways and children's play areas, create relaxing zones and comfort in mixed-use developments. An extensive analysis of city life establishes the fact that people thrive on spontaneous and circumstantial interaction. Mixed-use developments, such as the Business Bay and Jumeirah Beach Residence, complement the city's architectural objectives, while providing amenities for people to live, work, and play within the same premises". www.businessbay.ae Business Bay 26 Best of Dubai BestofDubai international player in the world iconic real estate infrastructure? "Business Bay will offer world class infrastructure, in terms of road networks and accessibility, as well as modern telecommunication facilities in hi-tech, sustainable commercial towers. In addition to providing a platform for international business, the mixed-use development will be supported by a strong retail sector and integrated residential projects. As opposed to traditional commercial areas that wind down in the evenings, Business Bay will be a thriving and self- sufficient community". What partnerships with industry stakeholders and international corporations, has Dubai Properties fostered in the development of Business Bay, and why? "Dubai Properties has ties with the local and regional business community. We have been approached by regional and international corporations to set up their regional headquarters in Business Bay. In addition, we have also entered into partnership with developers such as Sungwon, Bando, Porsche and Versace, among others, to develop world-first projects that will enhance the reputation of Business Bay as an enviable place to do business". Best of Dubai 27 AA city within a city, Business Bay is a freehold commercial, residential and business cluster that extends the famous Dubai Creek from Ras Al Khor to Sheikh Zayed Road. Covering an area of 64 million square feet, Business Bay will feature facilities such as commercial and residential towers, landscaped expanses of green, amenities every ilk, as well as a network for roads for easy access and exit. It will also boast canals to add to the project's themed aspect that government developer, Dubai Properties, is hoping to attract: regional and international business ventures and multinationals. The first phase of Dubai's staggering transformation into a buzzing hive of commercial activity began with the dredging of the Creek in the 1970s. With the new extension of the Creek, and the creation of Business Bay, developers hope that Dubai's entry into the premier business cities' league is finally ensured. Hashim Al Dabal, CEO, Dubai Properties, shares his insights about this new topographical wonder to Dubai's expanding urban-scape. How was the idea to expand upon the existing Dubai Creek and extend it into Business Bay formulated and why? "Dubai Creek has an historic value as the commercial centre of Dubai. Trading ships from India, Iran and the Arabian Gulf traded on the abra from as far back as 1850s. As a result when the idea for Business Bay as the region's business capital was conceived, we felt that it was symbolic to extend the Creek towards the new growth sector of the city, Sheikh Zayed Road and its environs". In what specific ways will Business Bay enhance Dubai's position as an Welcome to the newest symbol of the emirate's progress as it embodies the crucial role that the Creek plays in Dubai's past as well its future. Hashim Al Dabal, CEO, Dubai Properties Dancing Towers, Zahar Hadid’s enlightned architectural landmark Bussiness bay Story.qxp 12/28/2006 4:45 PM Page 1
  11. 11. With development in Dubai racing ahead at break- neck speed, what factors ensure that Business Bay will deserve the recognition and sustainability you have envisaged? "Business Bay has been planned as a mixed-use urban development, which offers the best design strategy for combining housing, employment, retail, cultural, and recreational activities in a people-friendly environment, creating dynamic, attractive neighbourhoods and communities". With the development of Business Bay marking the first concrete initiative to create a new commercial epicentre, are there more plans to increase the existence of additional commercial hubs, which by extension will enhance Dubai's role as a 'city at the crossroads of continents and economies'? "Dubai's economy is diversifying and the reliance on non-oil sectors means that the enhancement of existing commercial centres as well as the development of more commercial enterprises is inevitable. The World Bank has ranked the UAE 69th worldwide in terms of cost of doing business in 2005, higher than many other Middle East and North African countries. It also takes less time comparatively to secure property rights in the UAE - three steps and nine days to register property in Dubai compared with three steps and 52.2 days in MENA. Thus the UAE's competitiveness continues to attract investors, thereby necessitating the need to constantly improve our commercial centres and the associated facilities. At the same time, this eventually enhances Dubai's role as an important financial, trade and manufacturing hub in the world". With the desire to draw comparisons to Business Bay and other architectural and engineering achievements worldwide, what country or existing architectural feat would you say most inspired the concept behind the project and why? "Business Bay is inspired by the great financial centres of our time. However, successful urban environments are not just an emulation of other cities. With Business Bay, through its architectural and commercial achievements, our intention is to provide international executives and investors with another world-class commercial centre that provides something in addition to existing hubs". Can you define what Business Bay will mean for Dubai and for the architectural and commercial world as a whole and how will this add to reshaping the future of commerce in the region? "Business Bay will be to Dubai what Manhattan is to New York or Ginza is to Tokyo. It will provide the best possible commercial environment to world-class companies, international investors and multinational businesses. Our aim is to create a distinct personality for Dubai and its business heritage through architectural achievements, new market trends and bustling, self-sufficient urban environments that adopt international business practice with the Middle East touch". Given the fact that you are so involved in the fabric of Dubai's infrastructure and society, where would you like to see Dubai within ten years in terms of its international real estate development? "Dubai enjoys a good reputation in the international community, and that is mainly in part due to the efforts of its progressive government. At the same time, we hope to see more legislation and initiatives from the public and private sectors that will facilitate Dubai's growth beyond this region. In terms of real estate development, there are already a lot of projects under planning or in progress that will add to the value of this city, precipitating constant change in the infrastructure and society. Within ten years, we hope to see Dubai at the same level as the most advanced cities in the world". What makes an area particularly suited to mixed-use tenancy structures? "Mixed-use projects are a sophisticated trend that offers smart growth to the retail industry, bringing greater lifestyle convenience to communities. Facilities such as gardens, parkways, waterways and children's play areas, create relaxing zones and comfort in mixed-use developments. An extensive analysis of city life establishes the fact that people thrive on spontaneous and circumstantial interaction. Mixed-use developments, such as the Business Bay and Jumeirah Beach Residence, complement the city's architectural objectives, while providing amenities for people to live, work, and play within the same premises". www.businessbay.ae Business Bay 26 Best of Dubai BestofDubai international player in the world iconic real estate infrastructure? "Business Bay will offer world class infrastructure, in terms of road networks and accessibility, as well as modern telecommunication facilities in hi-tech, sustainable commercial towers. In addition to providing a platform for international business, the mixed-use development will be supported by a strong retail sector and integrated residential projects. As opposed to traditional commercial areas that wind down in the evenings, Business Bay will be a thriving and self- sufficient community". What partnerships with industry stakeholders and international corporations, has Dubai Properties fostered in the development of Business Bay, and why? "Dubai Properties has ties with the local and regional business community. We have been approached by regional and international corporations to set up their regional headquarters in Business Bay. In addition, we have also entered into partnership with developers such as Sungwon, Bando, Porsche and Versace, among others, to develop world-first projects that will enhance the reputation of Business Bay as an enviable place to do business". Best of Dubai 27 AA city within a city, Business Bay is a freehold commercial, residential and business cluster that extends the famous Dubai Creek from Ras Al Khor to Sheikh Zayed Road. Covering an area of 64 million square feet, Business Bay will feature facilities such as commercial and residential towers, landscaped expanses of green, amenities every ilk, as well as a network for roads for easy access and exit. It will also boast canals to add to the project's themed aspect that government developer, Dubai Properties, is hoping to attract: regional and international business ventures and multinationals. The first phase of Dubai's staggering transformation into a buzzing hive of commercial activity began with the dredging of the Creek in the 1970s. With the new extension of the Creek, and the creation of Business Bay, developers hope that Dubai's entry into the premier business cities' league is finally ensured. Hashim Al Dabal, CEO, Dubai Properties, shares his insights about this new topographical wonder to Dubai's expanding urban-scape. How was the idea to expand upon the existing Dubai Creek and extend it into Business Bay formulated and why? "Dubai Creek has an historic value as the commercial centre of Dubai. Trading ships from India, Iran and the Arabian Gulf traded on the abra from as far back as 1850s. As a result when the idea for Business Bay as the region's business capital was conceived, we felt that it was symbolic to extend the Creek towards the new growth sector of the city, Sheikh Zayed Road and its environs". In what specific ways will Business Bay enhance Dubai's position as an Welcome to the newest symbol of the emirate's progress as it embodies the crucial role that the Creek plays in Dubai's past as well its future. Hashim Al Dabal, CEO, Dubai Properties Dancing Towers, Zahar Hadid’s enlightned architectural landmark Bussiness bay Story.qxp 12/28/2006 4:45 PM Page 1
  12. 12. Future Fantastic 28 Best of Dubai BestofDubai WWoorrlldd''ss bbiiggggeesstt tthheemmee ppaarrkk Spread over an area of two billion square feet, bigger in surface area than Liechtenstein, this mega project is touted to become the region's own version of Disneyworld in Orlando (Florida), Dubailand. An entertainment, hospitality and mixed-use residential project par excellence, work on the major $5 billion parallel city, which encompasses six themed worlds, is being carried out in phases to be complete by 2012. A few facilities, such as Dubai Heritage Vision, Dubai Autodrome and The Global Village are already operational. Hoping to attract over 200,000 visitors per day thanks to its futuristic leisure and retail attractions ranging from a snow-dome ice and leisure park, Falconcity of Wonders (replicating larger-than-life replicas of world landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower and Taj Mahal), to a planet dome replete with animatronic dinosaurs as well as the world's largest shopping complex, 'Mall of Arabia', Dubailand is a testament to the emirate's determination to broaden its economy away from oil-related revenues towards tourism, real estate and leisure. www.dubailand.ae WWoorrlldd''ss bbiiggggeesstt iinntteerrnnaattiioonnaall aaiirrppoorrtt Occupying a staggering 140 km site, twice the size of Hong Kong Island, Dubai World Central International Airport will be the world's largest passenger and cargo hub boasting a capacity above 12 million tonnes of cargo and 120 million passengers annually when it is complete by 2012. An estimated AED 120 billion is being pumped into Dubai World Central, this multi- phased development centred on the international airport at Jebel Ali. Dubai's charismatic aviation visionary, Sheikh Ahmed HH Sheikh Ahmed Bin Saeed Al Maktoum, President of Dubai Department of Civil Aviation (DCA) and Chairman of Emirates Group recently announced: "The first phase of this mega-project - which primarily involves the development of infrastructure for DWC International Airport, Dubai Logistics City, Residential City, Commercial City, a Golf Resort and Enterprise Park - is already under construction and will be completed in the first quarter of 2008 at a total cost of AED 8 billion," . www.dubailogisticscity.com WWoorrlldd''ss ttaalllleesstt ttoowweerr With vertical supremacy at the core of the emirate's architectural ambitions, Burj Dubai (Arabic for 'Dubai Tower') is on the way to becoming the tallest skyscraper in the world, eclipsing current title holder, the 101 Taipei Tower in Taiwan. Blending commercial, residential, retail, leisure and hospitality in its overall plan in the midst of Dubai's flourishing 'downtown' district, its exact height is being kept a secret but it is expected to be more than 800 metres high. Clearly Dubai is trying to build itself a future as a celebrated global city. In the process, it has become the largest architectural experiment on earth. Designed by US skyscraper specialists Skidmore Owings and Merrill, it is an elegant structure in construction since 2005. The lead architect, Adrian Smith who is responsible for Chicago's Sears tower and many more vertical behemoths worldwide is creating a landmark that will allow an unfettered panorama across the Gulf to Iran on a clear day. Based on this projected height, the total number of habitable floors is expected to be around 162. As of early October 2006, the Burj was at 75 stories and about 287 metres high. From a three-pronged footprint, it rises up in slender, silver-glazed tubes. Being billed as the 'the most prestigious square kilometre in the world' by its government developer Emaar, "The Burj is nothing about the past," says Mohammed Ali Alabbar, Emaar's chairman. "It's about saying, 'We have arrived. We're here.' " www.burjduabi.com Best of Dubai 29 WWOORRLLDD''SS biggest man- made islands Made up of over one billion cubic metres of rock and sand, increasing Dubai's shoreline by 520 km with their nascent topography that will be visible from the Moon and can already be spotted from outer space, the 'iconic trio' are already considered the 'eighth wonder of the world'. Even though the three palm islands are still incomplete - Jumeirah, Jebel Ali and Deira - are rising from the water at break neck speed. Measuring 5.5 km in length and width, Jumeirah Palm will welcome a first batch of residents later this year. Cumulatively the three islands will eventually support over 60 luxury hotels, 4000 exclusive villas, 5000 shoreline apartments, marinas, water parks, miscellaneous health and leisure facilities as well as shopping malls galore. www.thepalm.ae WWoorrlldd''ss bbiiggggeesstt mmaann--mmaaddee aarrcchheeppeellaaggoo "The Palm put Dubai on the map, The World is putting the map on Dubai", so says government developer Nakheel chairman, Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem. To be ready by 2008, the strategically positioned islands fashioned to resemble the global map, will consist of 250 to 300 smaller private artificial islands divided into four categories. Measuring nine km in length and seven km in width, covering over 593 million square feet, the islands are set to create over 200 km of beaches. The only means of transportation between these luxury hideaways will be by boat, helicopter and submarine. Not a literal map of the world, channels have been carved between land masses such as 'France' and 'Spain', in order to create attractively saleable individual plots. Currently The World is undergoing its own tectonic shifts: a private consortium has purchased the whole of Australasia, so as to transform it into a holiday resort. They have plans to modify its shape completely by joining it all up with bridges, building a 12-storey hotel on the south island of New Zealand. The two-stage mammoth land reclamation project costing over US$ 3 billion follows the blueprint of the ultimate status symbol for the rich where owners buying individual 'nations' will have the freedom to create their personal lifestyle vision. Fascinated by the notion of owning a country, or even a continent, UK entrepreneur and Virgin chairman Richard Branson was recently spied pitching the British Union Jack on his latest purchase costing USD$ 30 million - the United Kingdom. www.theworld.ae With one in out of every six cranes worldwide operating in Dubai, the emirate's fast track development feeds on an endless supply of grandiose mega projects that provide a fresh impetus to Dubai's age-old trading reputation. The country is relentlessly, almost obsessively, building itself into significance. Under the auspices of the crown prince Sheikh Mohammed and the rest of the ruling Maktoum family, Dubai is being transformed from a blank canvas into an Arabic fusion of Singapore and Vegas. Palm Island, an impressive land reclamation project Close to the Palm Island, ‘The World ‘ is a mixed-use archepelago to be reckoned with Dubai Sports City in Dubailand, the world’s largest theme park Burj Dubai, the world's tallest tower World's biggest international airport Future Fantastic.qxp 12/28/2006 4:46 PM Page 1
  13. 13. Future Fantastic 28 Best of Dubai BestofDubai WWoorrlldd''ss bbiiggggeesstt tthheemmee ppaarrkk Spread over an area of two billion square feet, bigger in surface area than Liechtenstein, this mega project is touted to become the region's own version of Disneyworld in Orlando (Florida), Dubailand. An entertainment, hospitality and mixed-use residential project par excellence, work on the major $5 billion parallel city, which encompasses six themed worlds, is being carried out in phases to be complete by 2012. A few facilities, such as Dubai Heritage Vision, Dubai Autodrome and The Global Village are already operational. Hoping to attract over 200,000 visitors per day thanks to its futuristic leisure and retail attractions ranging from a snow-dome ice and leisure park, Falconcity of Wonders (replicating larger-than-life replicas of world landmarks such as the Eiffel Tower and Taj Mahal), to a planet dome replete with animatronic dinosaurs as well as the world's largest shopping complex, 'Mall of Arabia', Dubailand is a testament to the emirate's determination to broaden its economy away from oil-related revenues towards tourism, real estate and leisure. www.dubailand.ae WWoorrlldd''ss bbiiggggeesstt iinntteerrnnaattiioonnaall aaiirrppoorrtt Occupying a staggering 140 km site, twice the size of Hong Kong Island, Dubai World Central International Airport will be the world's largest passenger and cargo hub boasting a capacity above 12 million tonnes of cargo and 120 million passengers annually when it is complete by 2012. An estimated AED 120 billion is being pumped into Dubai World Central, this multi- phased development centred on the international airport at Jebel Ali. Dubai's charismatic aviation visionary, Sheikh Ahmed HH Sheikh Ahmed Bin Saeed Al Maktoum, President of Dubai Department of Civil Aviation (DCA) and Chairman of Emirates Group recently announced: "The first phase of this mega-project - which primarily involves the development of infrastructure for DWC International Airport, Dubai Logistics City, Residential City, Commercial City, a Golf Resort and Enterprise Park - is already under construction and will be completed in the first quarter of 2008 at a total cost of AED 8 billion," . www.dubailogisticscity.com WWoorrlldd''ss ttaalllleesstt ttoowweerr With vertical supremacy at the core of the emirate's architectural ambitions, Burj Dubai (Arabic for 'Dubai Tower') is on the way to becoming the tallest skyscraper in the world, eclipsing current title holder, the 101 Taipei Tower in Taiwan. Blending commercial, residential, retail, leisure and hospitality in its overall plan in the midst of Dubai's flourishing 'downtown' district, its exact height is being kept a secret but it is expected to be more than 800 metres high. Clearly Dubai is trying to build itself a future as a celebrated global city. In the process, it has become the largest architectural experiment on earth. Designed by US skyscraper specialists Skidmore Owings and Merrill, it is an elegant structure in construction since 2005. The lead architect, Adrian Smith who is responsible for Chicago's Sears tower and many more vertical behemoths worldwide is creating a landmark that will allow an unfettered panorama across the Gulf to Iran on a clear day. Based on this projected height, the total number of habitable floors is expected to be around 162. As of early October 2006, the Burj was at 75 stories and about 287 metres high. From a three-pronged footprint, it rises up in slender, silver-glazed tubes. Being billed as the 'the most prestigious square kilometre in the world' by its government developer Emaar, "The Burj is nothing about the past," says Mohammed Ali Alabbar, Emaar's chairman. "It's about saying, 'We have arrived. We're here.' " www.burjduabi.com Best of Dubai 29 WWOORRLLDD''SS biggest man- made islands Made up of over one billion cubic metres of rock and sand, increasing Dubai's shoreline by 520 km with their nascent topography that will be visible from the Moon and can already be spotted from outer space, the 'iconic trio' are already considered the 'eighth wonder of the world'. Even though the three palm islands are still incomplete - Jumeirah, Jebel Ali and Deira - are rising from the water at break neck speed. Measuring 5.5 km in length and width, Jumeirah Palm will welcome a first batch of residents later this year. Cumulatively the three islands will eventually support over 60 luxury hotels, 4000 exclusive villas, 5000 shoreline apartments, marinas, water parks, miscellaneous health and leisure facilities as well as shopping malls galore. www.thepalm.ae WWoorrlldd''ss bbiiggggeesstt mmaann--mmaaddee aarrcchheeppeellaaggoo "The Palm put Dubai on the map, The World is putting the map on Dubai", so says government developer Nakheel chairman, Sultan Ahmed Bin Sulayem. To be ready by 2008, the strategically positioned islands fashioned to resemble the global map, will consist of 250 to 300 smaller private artificial islands divided into four categories. Measuring nine km in length and seven km in width, covering over 593 million square feet, the islands are set to create over 200 km of beaches. The only means of transportation between these luxury hideaways will be by boat, helicopter and submarine. Not a literal map of the world, channels have been carved between land masses such as 'France' and 'Spain', in order to create attractively saleable individual plots. Currently The World is undergoing its own tectonic shifts: a private consortium has purchased the whole of Australasia, so as to transform it into a holiday resort. They have plans to modify its shape completely by joining it all up with bridges, building a 12-storey hotel on the south island of New Zealand. The two-stage mammoth land reclamation project costing over US$ 3 billion follows the blueprint of the ultimate status symbol for the rich where owners buying individual 'nations' will have the freedom to create their personal lifestyle vision. Fascinated by the notion of owning a country, or even a continent, UK entrepreneur and Virgin chairman Richard Branson was recently spied pitching the British Union Jack on his latest purchase costing USD$ 30 million - the United Kingdom. www.theworld.ae With one in out of every six cranes worldwide operating in Dubai, the emirate's fast track development feeds on an endless supply of grandiose mega projects that provide a fresh impetus to Dubai's age-old trading reputation. The country is relentlessly, almost obsessively, building itself into significance. Under the auspices of the crown prince Sheikh Mohammed and the rest of the ruling Maktoum family, Dubai is being transformed from a blank canvas into an Arabic fusion of Singapore and Vegas. Palm Island, an impressive land reclamation project Close to the Palm Island, ‘The World ‘ is a mixed-use archepelago to be reckoned with Dubai Sports City in Dubailand, the world’s largest theme park Burj Dubai, the world's tallest tower World's biggest international airport Future Fantastic.qxp 12/28/2006 4:46 PM Page 1
  14. 14. An enduring symbol of 'we're modern, we're going forward,' Dubai's love story with iconic, or at least record-breaking, architecture began in 1999 with the creation of the Burj Al-Arab. At 56 storeys, it remains the tallest and only all-suites hotel in the world. Its simple sail-like form has become Dubai's national symbol designed by British architects Atkins, but initially conceived by Sheikh Mohammed himself. Dubai's small pocket of 'old town', the Bastakia Quarter, still boasts examples of historic, pre-industrial architecture. Generally built with coral and lime-mortar walls, enveloped by an open courtyard, the defining feature of these traditional Gulf houses is the barjeel or 'wind tower': a square tower rising above the roofline that channels the winds into the interior. Together with sun-shading, these traditional houses (or rebuilt versions of them) feel perfectly inhabitable in the summer months without air-conditioning. They are the ultimate in ‘Green Buildings.’ Let’s face it, despite the amazing innovations of Dubai, resource conservation and management has never been high on the list of priorities. With the highest rate of water consumption per capita in the world, planning a sustainable eco-friendly future has evidently been a scarce priority in Dubai. Whilst developed nations veer towards a low-energy future, the UAE has oodles of cheap energy and a grand vision to fulfil. Hopefully a new awareness will set in. In the meantime, even though predictions have been made for decades that the infamous bubble will burst sooner rather than later, the massive amount of real estate coming onto the market, and the foreign workforce required to build and purchase it, makes the stakes now higher than ever. Ultimately, the issue is 'can the rest of the world keep up with the emirate's vision' or is Dubai is in for a reality check? How should a 21st-century Arab city look like? Ibn Battuta Mall showcases Arabian Nights-themed indoor villages and a sprawling Chinese-styled atrium with a life-sized sailing vessel in the middle. Egyptian-decorated Wafi City is all about obelisks and pyramids. Nakheel's International City project, housing 60,000 people in practically identical blocks, each garbed in varied national styles: for Thailand, pagoda-like spires, for England, a faux Buckingham Palace- style neo-classicism. There seems to be scarce distinction between resort architecture and residential housing. There is also not much of a holistic urban environment away from the old city centre, with discrete, self-contained developments, separated from each other by ten-lane highways or empty desert instead. Despite the many imaginative works in Dubai, architecturally Arab kitsch sometimes takes hold. Coloured glass and arbitrary turrets have been stuck onto concrete tower blocks. For residential estates and malls, sometimes Dubai risks co-opting the rest of the world for its architectural reference points. This is unnecessary with the thriving socio-economic diversity of the emirate, the unique climatic and environmental conditions and its desire for a recognizable global identity. Dubai is now abundantly ready to set trends in architecture by spearheading its own original design model. DesigninDubai Attempts have been made to adapt traditional Arabic architectural style to wide-scale contemporary commercial needs - most notably the Madinat Jumeirah, a complex of hotels, bars, shops and resort facilities surrounded by canals. Quirky and original, its mall is an indoor version of a traditional Arab souk, with craft shops and piped Bedouin music. Transport is also fun as you can move about the complex by internal river taxi. Even though the barjeels that make up its skyline are actually exhaust vents for the air-conditioning, the development comes together organically like an agglomeration of small buildings rather than an impersonal mega-structure. 30 Best of Dubai Best of Dubai 31 Future Fantastic.qxp 12/28/2006 4:46 PM Page 3
  15. 15. An enduring symbol of 'we're modern, we're going forward,' Dubai's love story with iconic, or at least record-breaking, architecture began in 1999 with the creation of the Burj Al-Arab. At 56 storeys, it remains the tallest and only all-suites hotel in the world. Its simple sail-like form has become Dubai's national symbol designed by British architects Atkins, but initially conceived by Sheikh Mohammed himself. Dubai's small pocket of 'old town', the Bastakia Quarter, still boasts examples of historic, pre-industrial architecture. Generally built with coral and lime-mortar walls, enveloped by an open courtyard, the defining feature of these traditional Gulf houses is the barjeel or 'wind tower': a square tower rising above the roofline that channels the winds into the interior. Together with sun-shading, these traditional houses (or rebuilt versions of them) feel perfectly inhabitable in the summer months without air-conditioning. They are the ultimate in ‘Green Buildings.’ Let’s face it, despite the amazing innovations of Dubai, resource conservation and management has never been high on the list of priorities. With the highest rate of water consumption per capita in the world, planning a sustainable eco-friendly future has evidently been a scarce priority in Dubai. Whilst developed nations veer towards a low-energy future, the UAE has oodles of cheap energy and a grand vision to fulfil. Hopefully a new awareness will set in. In the meantime, even though predictions have been made for decades that the infamous bubble will burst sooner rather than later, the massive amount of real estate coming onto the market, and the foreign workforce required to build and purchase it, makes the stakes now higher than ever. Ultimately, the issue is 'can the rest of the world keep up with the emirate's vision' or is Dubai is in for a reality check? How should a 21st-century Arab city look like? Ibn Battuta Mall showcases Arabian Nights-themed indoor villages and a sprawling Chinese-styled atrium with a life-sized sailing vessel in the middle. Egyptian-decorated Wafi City is all about obelisks and pyramids. Nakheel's International City project, housing 60,000 people in practically identical blocks, each garbed in varied national styles: for Thailand, pagoda-like spires, for England, a faux Buckingham Palace- style neo-classicism. There seems to be scarce distinction between resort architecture and residential housing. There is also not much of a holistic urban environment away from the old city centre, with discrete, self-contained developments, separated from each other by ten-lane highways or empty desert instead. Despite the many imaginative works in Dubai, architecturally Arab kitsch sometimes takes hold. Coloured glass and arbitrary turrets have been stuck onto concrete tower blocks. For residential estates and malls, sometimes Dubai risks co-opting the rest of the world for its architectural reference points. This is unnecessary with the thriving socio-economic diversity of the emirate, the unique climatic and environmental conditions and its desire for a recognizable global identity. Dubai is now abundantly ready to set trends in architecture by spearheading its own original design model. DesigninDubai Attempts have been made to adapt traditional Arabic architectural style to wide-scale contemporary commercial needs - most notably the Madinat Jumeirah, a complex of hotels, bars, shops and resort facilities surrounded by canals. Quirky and original, its mall is an indoor version of a traditional Arab souk, with craft shops and piped Bedouin music. Transport is also fun as you can move about the complex by internal river taxi. Even though the barjeels that make up its skyline are actually exhaust vents for the air-conditioning, the development comes together organically like an agglomeration of small buildings rather than an impersonal mega-structure. 30 Best of Dubai Best of Dubai 31 Future Fantastic.qxp 12/28/2006 4:46 PM Page 3
  16. 16. Best of Dubai 3332 Best of Dubai Legacy of a Visionary “My grandfather rode a camel, my father rode a camel, I drive a Mercedes, my son drives a Land Rover, his son will drive a Land Rover, but his son will ride a camel.” His Highness late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum (1912 - October 7, 1990) This thinking reflected His Highness late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum’s concern that Dubai's oil would someday run out in a decade or two. Thus, he worked to build an economy in Dubai that could survive the end of Dubai's oil boom - Tourism. His Highness Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum (1912 - October 7, 1990) was the Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai from 1979 until his death in 1990. His Prime Ministerial predecessor and successor was his son, His Highness late Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum, who was the prime minister of United Arab Emirates from 1971 to 1979 and from October 7, 1990 up until his sudden demise on January 4, 2006. Known and acknowledged as one of the most successful rulers in the Middle East, Sheikh Rashid was responsible for the transformation of Dubai into a modern port city and commercial hub. The Early Years His Highness Sheikh Rashid, Ruler of Dubai from 1958 - 1990, was the eighth ruler from the Al Maktoum family. Well-loved and greatly respected by the residents of Dubai, His Highness Sheikh Rashid ruled the Emirate with compassion and with a clear vision of what was required in order to transform Dubai into a modern city. Driven by this vision, Rashid accomplished what many believed to be impossible. As the first-born son of Sheikh Saeed, he involved himself at an early age in the politics of the Emirate. He frequently attended his father's Majlis; ever curious, he would listen intently to each man's dilemma or opinion. Eager to comprehend the minutiae of governing a state, he would spend long hours questioning his parents about the events of the day. As a child, he received the finest education available in the region at the time. He attended the Al Ahmadiyah School, and his studies included Islamic studies, Arabic and Arithmetic. Although he was a good student, the true focus of his enthusiasm was reserved for falconry and hunting. "From an early age, he was an excellent shot with the rifle and, while his mother took a leading role in his upbringing, falconry was a passion which brought together Sheikh Saeed and Sheikh Rashid, father and son, throughout their lives." These hunting expeditions, that were taken twice a year, led the Ruler and his hunting entourage to Iran and later, on occasion, to Pakistan. They provided Sheikh Rashid with brief, welcome respites from the responsibilities of his position. Houbara, gazelle, rabbit, and grouse were the game of choice. Sheikh Rashid's hand's-on approach called for a disciplined daily schedule. Twice daily he would tour Dubai to see for himself how the projects were progressing. Sheikh Rashid was never satisfied with a simple explanation; instead he wanted to have a detailed understanding of every project undertaken in Dubai. Furthermore, these inspections provided him with the opportunity to meet with the man on the street. "After returning home in the evening, it was time to take on more official business in the traditional evening Majlis, an occasion where the Ruler gave his people the opportunity to meet him and share problems or grievances. This duty was one which Sheikh Rashid took very seriously." Sheikh Rashid was famed and admired for his patience on these occasions; he thoughtfully considered each man's complaint or opinion, ensuring that proper assistance was given to each individual. The Majlis, a mix of nationals, also provided a vibrant stage for debate. Surrounded by men whose opinions he valued, projects were dissected, moulded together, and often implemented by members of the Majlis. BestofDubai Sheikh Rashid found himself engaged in efforts on two levels, both in Dubai and on a pan-Truicial States basis. (Khaleej Times) ImagescourtesyofMediaPrima When Dubai’s commercial artery, Creek, was silting up and impacting the economic activity, the people turned to Sheikh Rashid to find a solution (Dubai Municipality) Left: Sheikh Rashid and two of his four sons, Sheikh Hamdan (left) and Sheikh Mohammed (right) Sheikh Rashid and Sheikh Mohammed
  17. 17. Best of Dubai 3332 Best of Dubai Legacy of a Visionary “My grandfather rode a camel, my father rode a camel, I drive a Mercedes, my son drives a Land Rover, his son will drive a Land Rover, but his son will ride a camel.” His Highness late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum (1912 - October 7, 1990) This thinking reflected His Highness late Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum’s concern that Dubai's oil would someday run out in a decade or two. Thus, he worked to build an economy in Dubai that could survive the end of Dubai's oil boom - Tourism. His Highness Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum (1912 - October 7, 1990) was the Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai from 1979 until his death in 1990. His Prime Ministerial predecessor and successor was his son, His Highness late Sheikh Maktoum bin Rashid Al Maktoum, who was the prime minister of United Arab Emirates from 1971 to 1979 and from October 7, 1990 up until his sudden demise on January 4, 2006. Known and acknowledged as one of the most successful rulers in the Middle East, Sheikh Rashid was responsible for the transformation of Dubai into a modern port city and commercial hub. The Early Years His Highness Sheikh Rashid, Ruler of Dubai from 1958 - 1990, was the eighth ruler from the Al Maktoum family. Well-loved and greatly respected by the residents of Dubai, His Highness Sheikh Rashid ruled the Emirate with compassion and with a clear vision of what was required in order to transform Dubai into a modern city. Driven by this vision, Rashid accomplished what many believed to be impossible. As the first-born son of Sheikh Saeed, he involved himself at an early age in the politics of the Emirate. He frequently attended his father's Majlis; ever curious, he would listen intently to each man's dilemma or opinion. Eager to comprehend the minutiae of governing a state, he would spend long hours questioning his parents about the events of the day. As a child, he received the finest education available in the region at the time. He attended the Al Ahmadiyah School, and his studies included Islamic studies, Arabic and Arithmetic. Although he was a good student, the true focus of his enthusiasm was reserved for falconry and hunting. "From an early age, he was an excellent shot with the rifle and, while his mother took a leading role in his upbringing, falconry was a passion which brought together Sheikh Saeed and Sheikh Rashid, father and son, throughout their lives." These hunting expeditions, that were taken twice a year, led the Ruler and his hunting entourage to Iran and later, on occasion, to Pakistan. They provided Sheikh Rashid with brief, welcome respites from the responsibilities of his position. Houbara, gazelle, rabbit, and grouse were the game of choice. Sheikh Rashid's hand's-on approach called for a disciplined daily schedule. Twice daily he would tour Dubai to see for himself how the projects were progressing. Sheikh Rashid was never satisfied with a simple explanation; instead he wanted to have a detailed understanding of every project undertaken in Dubai. Furthermore, these inspections provided him with the opportunity to meet with the man on the street. "After returning home in the evening, it was time to take on more official business in the traditional evening Majlis, an occasion where the Ruler gave his people the opportunity to meet him and share problems or grievances. This duty was one which Sheikh Rashid took very seriously." Sheikh Rashid was famed and admired for his patience on these occasions; he thoughtfully considered each man's complaint or opinion, ensuring that proper assistance was given to each individual. The Majlis, a mix of nationals, also provided a vibrant stage for debate. Surrounded by men whose opinions he valued, projects were dissected, moulded together, and often implemented by members of the Majlis. BestofDubai Sheikh Rashid found himself engaged in efforts on two levels, both in Dubai and on a pan-Truicial States basis. (Khaleej Times) ImagescourtesyofMediaPrima When Dubai’s commercial artery, Creek, was silting up and impacting the economic activity, the people turned to Sheikh Rashid to find a solution (Dubai Municipality) Left: Sheikh Rashid and two of his four sons, Sheikh Hamdan (left) and Sheikh Mohammed (right) Sheikh Rashid and Sheikh Mohammed
  18. 18. Best of Dubai 3534 Best of Dubai history of the UAE. With an eye on less affluent citizens, Sheikh Maktoum spear- headedaprogrammetoconstructthousands of new homes in projects throughout the United Emirates. He and his brothers were also responsible for transforming Dubai into one of the most impressive cities in the world. Development Between 1990 and 2006, Sheikh Maktoum's leadership led to nationwide development. In Dubai, this has resulted in major infra- structure projects, including internationally renowned sporting facilities, an impressive road network, modern parks and gardens, and public libraries. Dubai International Airport has also been expanded and improved to reflect the Emirates’ status as the regional aviation hub. His love of horses showed in his intro- duction of international horse racing to the Arab world. He and his brothers ran the highly successful Godolphin stables and Sheikh Maktoum was the most successful horse owner in Europe in 1997. He played a major role in raising the standard of international racing. Modern technology diversified Dubai has been quick to adapt to the intro- duction of e-commerce and the rapid technological development of recent years. The establishment of Dubai Internet City, in October 2000, and Dubai Media City, in January 2001, has ensured that the majority of the world’s major business players have a presence in Dubai. Both these establish- ments offer their clients state-of-the-art infrastructure and many business incentives. Together with Dubai Knowledge Village they make up the Dubai Technology, E- Commerce and Media Free Zone, a central feature of the plans for Dubai’s future. Information technology has not only been incorporated into Dubai’s trade and industry, but also into its education system and its government. The e-government project is another vital part of the Al Maktoum family’s plans for the future. Dubai has also moved into the world of international finance, with the opening, in February 2002, of the Dubai International Financial Centre, which Sheikh Mohammed announced would “be a bridge for financial services between our region and the inter-national markets 24 hours a day and 7 days aweek.”Headded,“thiscentre willprovideanidealbusinessenvironment basedonahighly developed infrastructure, and control regula-tions and laws that rival the latest and most competent regulations and laws worldwide.” Progress Before 1990, Dubai International Airport was always busy, but the majority of passengers were in transit. Now, millions of them each year stay in Dubai for their holidays, and the airport is even busier. In 2001 the state-of- the-art Sheikh Rashid Terminal opened to cater for the increase in passengers. The Maktoum brothers have introduced many initiatives to attract more visitors to Dubai, the most famous of which is the Dubai Shopping Festival – an annual month- long event during which the majority of Dubai’s stores offer considerable discounts on their goods. One of the most popular featuresoftheShoppingFestivalistheGlobal Village, where various countries take the opportunity to showcase their heritage through exhibitions of traditional handicrafts, clothing,food,musicanddance.Eachcountry has its own pavilion, and every evening throughout the Shopping Festival, crowds flock to the Village to enjoy this perfect example of Dubai’s cosmopolitan nature. In recent years, Dubai has witnessed the development of some of the world’s most well-appointed and architecturally accom- plished hotels. On a man-made island just off the shore of Jumeirah, the world’s tallest hotel, the Burj Al Arab, stands. This building, built to resemble the sail of a traditional Arabian dhow, is the centrepiece of Dubai’s tourism industry, offering the most luxurious accommodationimaginable.Themostrecent Palm Island and The World projects prove that the Eighth Wonder of the World is indeed in Dubai. Little wonder, then, that the projects’ builders say, “The Palm puts Dubai on the Map, but the World puts the map on Dubai.” Achievement Despite the recent success that Dubai has enjoyed in this area, the Maktoum brothers haveshownthattheysharetheirfather’straitof striving for continual improvement by stating their aim to increase the number of tourists visiting Dubai annually from twenty-five million in 2005 to over fifty million by the year 2010. Innovative projects such as Burj Dubai, Dubai Festival City, International City, Dubai Water- frontandDubailand-plansthatcombineenter- tainment, dining, shopping, marinas, hotels, offices and residential apartments – are all manifestationsoftheMaktoumfamilies’commit- ment to bring to fruition the vision of the found- ingfatherSheikhRashidbinSaeedAlMaktoum. The discovery of oil certainly helped, but it is His Highness Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum’s family’s commitment and intelli- gent use of resources that has modernised Dubai. The tale of Dubai is a tale of the wisdom of its Rulers. Sheikh Rashid and delegates on a visit to Dubai Port Services (Khaleej Times) Determined in his unfaltering belief that a modernised Dubai could be achieved, Sheikh Rashid initiated numerous remarkable developments in his city-state. Project Inc. Projects viewed as impossible by many members of society (including foreign nationals) were seen as challenges by the Ruler. Examples of such projects included the Al Maktoum Hospital, the first modern hospital in what was then the Trucial States; the Al Maktoum Bridge, which spanned the Creek, joining Dubai with Deira and eliminating the long trip around the head of the Creek; and the Dubai Airport, which bore immediate reward as demand for seats grew much faster than anticipated. "Both these projects, the airport and the bridge, showed clearly that Dubai’s infrastructure planning was hardly ever just a response to the immediate needs of the community: it was clearly linked to the ambitious ideas about the future development of Dubai." With his passing away on October 7, 1990, Sheikh Rashid left behind a legacy visible in the town planning of Dubai. News of his death travelled far and wide. Heads of States throughout the world sent their condolences. Most extraordinary, however, was the reaction across the Atlantic in New York, at the United Nations. The General Assembly was debating a motion on Palestine when invited to mark the passing of Dubai's leader. Both General Assembly and Security Council observed a minute's silence, after which representatives of Kuwait, Poland and the US paid tribute to Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum. Though scarcely a whisper marked his birth in 1912, in a place which few outsiders at the time had even heard of, Sheikh Rashid had laboured hard to develop Dubai and later the United Arab Emirates into a lasting and sustainable entity. Seventy-eight years later, his death drew the world community to its feet in the UN General Assembly, a remarkable tribute to a remarkable man and his many achievements. A legacy he left to his sons, who continue to follow in their father’s footsteps. A Vision Accomplished Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum recognised that Dubai had the potential to become a great city. When he became the Ruler of Dubai in 1958, Dubai's infrastructure was developing to accommodate its rapidly growing population. It was evident that basic services needed to be established and existing services improved upon, but Sheikh Rashid never settled for just meeting needs when he could plan for the future. In 1959, work began on dredging the creek, which had silted up rapidly during the 1950s, limiting the number of seagoing vessels that could enter it. As the creek was deepened, the excavated rock and soil was deposited on low laying land along its shores, this reclaimed land was sold to pay for the project. By the end of 1960, the creek project was completed and shipping lines began using Dubai as their main port in the Gulf. Demand dictated the need for new wharfs, warehouses and port facilities. In 1967, construction began on a deep-water harbour. Originally designed for four berths, the completed harbour had fifteen and eventually expanded to thirty-five. Built to service the largest ships, Port Rashid officially opened on 5 October 1972. A second port was later built at Jebel Ali, just south of the city. Above: Sheikh Rashid and his party on the steps of the Capitol Building in Washington. Inset: Visiting the United Nations in New York (Dubai Petroleum Company) Right: Sheikh Rashid visiting a rig. Excitement grew in Dubai as news spread that the government was about to announce the discovery of commercial oil deposits. (Simon Nicolas) An imposing harbour with sixty-seven berths made it the world's largest manmade port at the time. Built around the port, the Jebel Ali Free Zone was founded in 1985. The airfield that Sheikh Rashid ordered in 1959 opened in 1961 it proved very popular with airlines seeking landing rights. As more companies established bases in Dubai and the population grew, the airfield expanded. In 1985, Dubai's airport became the home base for the newly founded Emirates Airline. The mastermind of numerous projects, Sheikh Rashid was steadfast in his belief that anything is possible. Dubai's transformation is the result of massive effort driven by the vision of its rulers. Sheikh Rashid’s decades The achievements of the UAE in the past three decades are evidence of the abilities of the people who worked selflessly alongside the first UAE President, His Highness Late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan. In May 1981, Sheikh Rashid fell ill and the onus fell firmly on his four sons. Although he recovered, he still needed much rest, leaving the practical management of day-to-day affairs to Sheikh Maktoum, who was ably supported by his brothers, Sheikh Hamdan, Sheikh Mohammed and Sheikh Ahmed. The three brothers formed an effective leadership team that maintained and expanded their father's legacy. Following the death of Sheikh Rashid in November 1990, Sheikh Maktoum became Ruler of Dubai and Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE, positions he held until he passed away in January 2006. Sheikh Maktoum's return as Prime Minister coincided with one of the most astonishing bursts of national development in the thirty-year
  19. 19. Best of Dubai 3534 Best of Dubai history of the UAE. With an eye on less affluent citizens, Sheikh Maktoum spear- headedaprogrammetoconstructthousands of new homes in projects throughout the United Emirates. He and his brothers were also responsible for transforming Dubai into one of the most impressive cities in the world. Development Between 1990 and 2006, Sheikh Maktoum's leadership led to nationwide development. In Dubai, this has resulted in major infra- structure projects, including internationally renowned sporting facilities, an impressive road network, modern parks and gardens, and public libraries. Dubai International Airport has also been expanded and improved to reflect the Emirates’ status as the regional aviation hub. His love of horses showed in his intro- duction of international horse racing to the Arab world. He and his brothers ran the highly successful Godolphin stables and Sheikh Maktoum was the most successful horse owner in Europe in 1997. He played a major role in raising the standard of international racing. Modern technology diversified Dubai has been quick to adapt to the intro- duction of e-commerce and the rapid technological development of recent years. The establishment of Dubai Internet City, in October 2000, and Dubai Media City, in January 2001, has ensured that the majority of the world’s major business players have a presence in Dubai. Both these establish- ments offer their clients state-of-the-art infrastructure and many business incentives. Together with Dubai Knowledge Village they make up the Dubai Technology, E- Commerce and Media Free Zone, a central feature of the plans for Dubai’s future. Information technology has not only been incorporated into Dubai’s trade and industry, but also into its education system and its government. The e-government project is another vital part of the Al Maktoum family’s plans for the future. Dubai has also moved into the world of international finance, with the opening, in February 2002, of the Dubai International Financial Centre, which Sheikh Mohammed announced would “be a bridge for financial services between our region and the inter-national markets 24 hours a day and 7 days aweek.”Headded,“thiscentre willprovideanidealbusinessenvironment basedonahighly developed infrastructure, and control regula-tions and laws that rival the latest and most competent regulations and laws worldwide.” Progress Before 1990, Dubai International Airport was always busy, but the majority of passengers were in transit. Now, millions of them each year stay in Dubai for their holidays, and the airport is even busier. In 2001 the state-of- the-art Sheikh Rashid Terminal opened to cater for the increase in passengers. The Maktoum brothers have introduced many initiatives to attract more visitors to Dubai, the most famous of which is the Dubai Shopping Festival – an annual month- long event during which the majority of Dubai’s stores offer considerable discounts on their goods. One of the most popular featuresoftheShoppingFestivalistheGlobal Village, where various countries take the opportunity to showcase their heritage through exhibitions of traditional handicrafts, clothing,food,musicanddance.Eachcountry has its own pavilion, and every evening throughout the Shopping Festival, crowds flock to the Village to enjoy this perfect example of Dubai’s cosmopolitan nature. In recent years, Dubai has witnessed the development of some of the world’s most well-appointed and architecturally accom- plished hotels. On a man-made island just off the shore of Jumeirah, the world’s tallest hotel, the Burj Al Arab, stands. This building, built to resemble the sail of a traditional Arabian dhow, is the centrepiece of Dubai’s tourism industry, offering the most luxurious accommodationimaginable.Themostrecent Palm Island and The World projects prove that the Eighth Wonder of the World is indeed in Dubai. Little wonder, then, that the projects’ builders say, “The Palm puts Dubai on the Map, but the World puts the map on Dubai.” Achievement Despite the recent success that Dubai has enjoyed in this area, the Maktoum brothers haveshownthattheysharetheirfather’straitof striving for continual improvement by stating their aim to increase the number of tourists visiting Dubai annually from twenty-five million in 2005 to over fifty million by the year 2010. Innovative projects such as Burj Dubai, Dubai Festival City, International City, Dubai Water- frontandDubailand-plansthatcombineenter- tainment, dining, shopping, marinas, hotels, offices and residential apartments – are all manifestationsoftheMaktoumfamilies’commit- ment to bring to fruition the vision of the found- ingfatherSheikhRashidbinSaeedAlMaktoum. The discovery of oil certainly helped, but it is His Highness Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum’s family’s commitment and intelli- gent use of resources that has modernised Dubai. The tale of Dubai is a tale of the wisdom of its Rulers. Sheikh Rashid and delegates on a visit to Dubai Port Services (Khaleej Times) Determined in his unfaltering belief that a modernised Dubai could be achieved, Sheikh Rashid initiated numerous remarkable developments in his city-state. Project Inc. Projects viewed as impossible by many members of society (including foreign nationals) were seen as challenges by the Ruler. Examples of such projects included the Al Maktoum Hospital, the first modern hospital in what was then the Trucial States; the Al Maktoum Bridge, which spanned the Creek, joining Dubai with Deira and eliminating the long trip around the head of the Creek; and the Dubai Airport, which bore immediate reward as demand for seats grew much faster than anticipated. "Both these projects, the airport and the bridge, showed clearly that Dubai’s infrastructure planning was hardly ever just a response to the immediate needs of the community: it was clearly linked to the ambitious ideas about the future development of Dubai." With his passing away on October 7, 1990, Sheikh Rashid left behind a legacy visible in the town planning of Dubai. News of his death travelled far and wide. Heads of States throughout the world sent their condolences. Most extraordinary, however, was the reaction across the Atlantic in New York, at the United Nations. The General Assembly was debating a motion on Palestine when invited to mark the passing of Dubai's leader. Both General Assembly and Security Council observed a minute's silence, after which representatives of Kuwait, Poland and the US paid tribute to Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum. Though scarcely a whisper marked his birth in 1912, in a place which few outsiders at the time had even heard of, Sheikh Rashid had laboured hard to develop Dubai and later the United Arab Emirates into a lasting and sustainable entity. Seventy-eight years later, his death drew the world community to its feet in the UN General Assembly, a remarkable tribute to a remarkable man and his many achievements. A legacy he left to his sons, who continue to follow in their father’s footsteps. A Vision Accomplished Sheikh Rashid bin Saeed Al Maktoum recognised that Dubai had the potential to become a great city. When he became the Ruler of Dubai in 1958, Dubai's infrastructure was developing to accommodate its rapidly growing population. It was evident that basic services needed to be established and existing services improved upon, but Sheikh Rashid never settled for just meeting needs when he could plan for the future. In 1959, work began on dredging the creek, which had silted up rapidly during the 1950s, limiting the number of seagoing vessels that could enter it. As the creek was deepened, the excavated rock and soil was deposited on low laying land along its shores, this reclaimed land was sold to pay for the project. By the end of 1960, the creek project was completed and shipping lines began using Dubai as their main port in the Gulf. Demand dictated the need for new wharfs, warehouses and port facilities. In 1967, construction began on a deep-water harbour. Originally designed for four berths, the completed harbour had fifteen and eventually expanded to thirty-five. Built to service the largest ships, Port Rashid officially opened on 5 October 1972. A second port was later built at Jebel Ali, just south of the city. Above: Sheikh Rashid and his party on the steps of the Capitol Building in Washington. Inset: Visiting the United Nations in New York (Dubai Petroleum Company) Right: Sheikh Rashid visiting a rig. Excitement grew in Dubai as news spread that the government was about to announce the discovery of commercial oil deposits. (Simon Nicolas) An imposing harbour with sixty-seven berths made it the world's largest manmade port at the time. Built around the port, the Jebel Ali Free Zone was founded in 1985. The airfield that Sheikh Rashid ordered in 1959 opened in 1961 it proved very popular with airlines seeking landing rights. As more companies established bases in Dubai and the population grew, the airfield expanded. In 1985, Dubai's airport became the home base for the newly founded Emirates Airline. The mastermind of numerous projects, Sheikh Rashid was steadfast in his belief that anything is possible. Dubai's transformation is the result of massive effort driven by the vision of its rulers. Sheikh Rashid’s decades The achievements of the UAE in the past three decades are evidence of the abilities of the people who worked selflessly alongside the first UAE President, His Highness Late Sheikh Zayed bin Sultan Al Nahyan. In May 1981, Sheikh Rashid fell ill and the onus fell firmly on his four sons. Although he recovered, he still needed much rest, leaving the practical management of day-to-day affairs to Sheikh Maktoum, who was ably supported by his brothers, Sheikh Hamdan, Sheikh Mohammed and Sheikh Ahmed. The three brothers formed an effective leadership team that maintained and expanded their father's legacy. Following the death of Sheikh Rashid in November 1990, Sheikh Maktoum became Ruler of Dubai and Vice President and Prime Minister of the UAE, positions he held until he passed away in January 2006. Sheikh Maktoum's return as Prime Minister coincided with one of the most astonishing bursts of national development in the thirty-year
  20. 20. Best of Dubai 3736 Best of Dubai Consisting of Dubai Internet City, Dubai Media City, Dubai Knowledge Village, International Media Production Zone, Dubai Outsource Zone, Dubai Biotechnology and Research Park, Dubai Studio City, e-Hosting Datafort, ITEP and TAMKEEN , TECOM Investments provides a range of services and opportunities for international corporations and companies to operate successfully from the Middle East. An initiative born out of the vision of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, the TECOM Investments project began in 2000 as part of an ambitious and visionary ten-year plan. The aim was to revolutionise and diversify the emirate's booming economy, which was previously reliant on the oil industry. The concept stands forth as a successful implementation of cluster economies as propounded by Michael Porter through his theories. This is a familiar business model in the Arab world where industries such as gold, textiles, spices and electronics have all naturally clustered into 'souks'. The campus-style environments of Dubai Internet City, Dubai Media City and Dubai Knowledge Village provide the ultimate operations and networking facilities. Equipment vendors are next door to systems integrators for convenient coordination, while the close proximity of Dubai Media City encourages interaction between advertising agencies and creative free-lancers. Specialist training for companies and general academia is also available in Dubai Knowledge village. The incentives for companies entering TECOM Investments' free zone are numerous. From support services provided by its internal departments, sister companies and subsidiaries, businesses are offered the ultimate efficiency, convenience and flexibility. In fact, TECOM is now exporting its expertise in developing and managing knowledge-industry business clusters and is holding discussions with several cities in Asia and Europe to establish business parks there. It has also tied up with Dubai Investment Group (DIG), its sister company in the Dubai Holding group to make strategic telecom acquisitions. Today, this unique free zone is the ultimate success story. Home to hundreds of global companies, it is recognised internationally as a world-leading business climate, serving information and communication technology, (ITC) media, education, biotechnology and energy. Interview with TECOM Investments CEO, Abdullatif Al Mulla: With interests ranging from technology clusters to e-education, what is the common thread that links all of these entities together? What other areas do you want to conquer? TECOM clusters are united by one goal - the development of Dubai's knowledge- based economy. TECOM's first cluster, Dubai Internet City, was established in October 2000, to develop the information and communication technology (ICT) sector. Dubai Media City and Dubai Knowledge Village were set up subsequently to develop the media and education sectors respectively. Later we launched initiatives targeted at niche industries. International Media Production Zone (IMPZ) was focused on printing and publishing and Dubai Studio City was dedicated to film, broadcast and music production. Business process outsourcing (BPO) was another area we identified as potentially high-growth, and therefore we launched Dubai Outsource Zone (DOZ). Later, we announced the Dubai Biotechnology and Research Park (DuBiotech) to develop the knowledge- intensive biotechnology sector. TECOM is constantly exploring new opportunities in knowledge-based sectors where we can add value. What is your vision for your group in 10 years' time? How do you think telecommunications will transform Dubai and what role do you think TECOM will have played in this development? Over the past five years, TECOM has acquired considerable expertise in setting up and managing business campuses for knowledge based industries and we are now looking to share this expertise with other countries. TECOM is in talks with governments of countries in Asia and Europe to set up IT and media business campuses in cities with high growth potential. This will create a network of business campuses, which will create tremendous synergies and promote growth both in Dubai and the regions they are located in. Our vision for TECOM in the next 10 years is to be a leading player in the global knowledge-based economy. Telecommunications is an integral part of TECOM's strategy to go international. We recently acquired stakes in Maltacom and Tunisie Telecom. We have also invested in Interoute, the owner and operator of Europe's largest and most-advanced voice and data network and Axiom Telecom, the largest distributor and retailer of wireless products in the region. BestofDubai TECOM Investments is Dubai's state-of-the-art free zone for business globalisation, a distinction it has earned for itself through the advanced infrastructure and supportive red tape free environment offered to its associates. Standing Tall Abdullatif Al Mulla CEO - TECOM Investments Dubai Media City
  21. 21. Best of Dubai 3736 Best of Dubai Consisting of Dubai Internet City, Dubai Media City, Dubai Knowledge Village, International Media Production Zone, Dubai Outsource Zone, Dubai Biotechnology and Research Park, Dubai Studio City, e-Hosting Datafort, ITEP and TAMKEEN , TECOM Investments provides a range of services and opportunities for international corporations and companies to operate successfully from the Middle East. An initiative born out of the vision of His Highness Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, Vice-President and Prime Minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, the TECOM Investments project began in 2000 as part of an ambitious and visionary ten-year plan. The aim was to revolutionise and diversify the emirate's booming economy, which was previously reliant on the oil industry. The concept stands forth as a successful implementation of cluster economies as propounded by Michael Porter through his theories. This is a familiar business model in the Arab world where industries such as gold, textiles, spices and electronics have all naturally clustered into 'souks'. The campus-style environments of Dubai Internet City, Dubai Media City and Dubai Knowledge Village provide the ultimate operations and networking facilities. Equipment vendors are next door to systems integrators for convenient coordination, while the close proximity of Dubai Media City encourages interaction between advertising agencies and creative free-lancers. Specialist training for companies and general academia is also available in Dubai Knowledge village. The incentives for companies entering TECOM Investments' free zone are numerous. From support services provided by its internal departments, sister companies and subsidiaries, businesses are offered the ultimate efficiency, convenience and flexibility. In fact, TECOM is now exporting its expertise in developing and managing knowledge-industry business clusters and is holding discussions with several cities in Asia and Europe to establish business parks there. It has also tied up with Dubai Investment Group (DIG), its sister company in the Dubai Holding group to make strategic telecom acquisitions. Today, this unique free zone is the ultimate success story. Home to hundreds of global companies, it is recognised internationally as a world-leading business climate, serving information and communication technology, (ITC) media, education, biotechnology and energy. Interview with TECOM Investments CEO, Abdullatif Al Mulla: With interests ranging from technology clusters to e-education, what is the common thread that links all of these entities together? What other areas do you want to conquer? TECOM clusters are united by one goal - the development of Dubai's knowledge- based economy. TECOM's first cluster, Dubai Internet City, was established in October 2000, to develop the information and communication technology (ICT) sector. Dubai Media City and Dubai Knowledge Village were set up subsequently to develop the media and education sectors respectively. Later we launched initiatives targeted at niche industries. International Media Production Zone (IMPZ) was focused on printing and publishing and Dubai Studio City was dedicated to film, broadcast and music production. Business process outsourcing (BPO) was another area we identified as potentially high-growth, and therefore we launched Dubai Outsource Zone (DOZ). Later, we announced the Dubai Biotechnology and Research Park (DuBiotech) to develop the knowledge- intensive biotechnology sector. TECOM is constantly exploring new opportunities in knowledge-based sectors where we can add value. What is your vision for your group in 10 years' time? How do you think telecommunications will transform Dubai and what role do you think TECOM will have played in this development? Over the past five years, TECOM has acquired considerable expertise in setting up and managing business campuses for knowledge based industries and we are now looking to share this expertise with other countries. TECOM is in talks with governments of countries in Asia and Europe to set up IT and media business campuses in cities with high growth potential. This will create a network of business campuses, which will create tremendous synergies and promote growth both in Dubai and the regions they are located in. Our vision for TECOM in the next 10 years is to be a leading player in the global knowledge-based economy. Telecommunications is an integral part of TECOM's strategy to go international. We recently acquired stakes in Maltacom and Tunisie Telecom. We have also invested in Interoute, the owner and operator of Europe's largest and most-advanced voice and data network and Axiom Telecom, the largest distributor and retailer of wireless products in the region. BestofDubai TECOM Investments is Dubai's state-of-the-art free zone for business globalisation, a distinction it has earned for itself through the advanced infrastructure and supportive red tape free environment offered to its associates. Standing Tall Abdullatif Al Mulla CEO - TECOM Investments Dubai Media City
  22. 22. We seek to contribute to the economic development of the regions we are investing in, which in the long run will contribute to the success of our initiatives. What other geographic markets do you wish to enter, now that TECOM already has a presence in Malta, Tunisia, and Europe? Our telecom investment strategy is global with a special focus on the Middle East and Mediterranean regions. What are the critical components of creating a successful cluster development? Do you think that this model can be successfully implemented in every country? The single-most critical factor behind the success of a planned cluster is the environment and infrastructure it provides. TECOM clusters have been successful because they have provided an exceptional hard and soft infrastructure as well as a host of financial incentives, and business-enabling and business development services. Our objective is to help companies cut down their operational hassles so that they can concentrate on their core business. In addition, we provide them several opportunities for business development. The success of this model depends on the support and commitment of key stake-holders, mainly the government. Dubai's government has shown exceptional vision and commitment in supporting TECOM's knowledge- based clusters. What impact will the convergence of communications technologies have on the need for businesses to be located in physical proximity? How will you manage the balancing act of being a technology leader while keeping the real estate projects fully occupied? The convergence of communication technologies has revolutionised the way corporations do business and it has facilitated tremendous efficiencies. But you cannot limit the value of human interaction in conducting business. Locating in a cluster gives companies greater opportunities to establish human relationships with partners, suppliers and customers critical to the development of business. So, our aim to be a technology leader does not conflict with our need to build a community of knowledge- based companies. Demand for space in the Media and Internet Cities still exceeds supply. What provisions have you made for further expansion? Dubai Internet City and Dubai Media City are poised for massive expansion with a number of private investors developing buildings on Free Zone land. About 27 buildings are expected to be built in the next five years. This expansion will create the capacity for the growth of Dubai Media City and Dubai Internet City into a richer and even more vibrant knowledge industry hub. What kind of businesses are you seeking for prime tenancy of Studio City? From where do most of them originate? Dubai Studio City is a cluster for film, broadcast and music production companies across the world. We are particularly targeting the Hollywood and Bollywood film industries, which have being showing increasing interest in what Dubai Studio City has to offer. In the immediate term, we will be catering to the demand from Dubai Media City's broadcasting companies which are looking for the infrastructure to expand. Ultimately, Dubai Studio City aims to build a large cluster of companies from across the industry value-chain. These include production companies, support service providers offering production and post-production facilities, animation studios and services like dubbing, make-up, costume designing, stage designing and building, casting, telnet agencies as well as telecine and lab facilities. Your stated aim in supporting e-TQM is to promote quality management. What does that mean for you? Total quality management is about quality being the guiding principle of everything that we do. It is a tool which enables all members of our team to become involved in the continuous improvement of our services. It is also about a commitment to standards, systems and processes that help us achieve high customer satisfaction. What is TECOM's biggest strength? TECOM's biggest strength is its people. They are the ones responsible for our achievements and our continued success. And therefore, we believe that by developing our people we can develop our company. If there was one thing in your career you would like to change or do better, what would it be? I am striving to work closer with my team leaders to shift the mindset of employees so that we can raise their efficiency, productivity and effectiveness to meet international benchmarks rather than just local or regional. TECOM has always demonstrated its leadership in raising standards to meet international bench-marks and we will continue to do so. Tel.: +9714 391 1111 www.tecom.ae DuBiotech Headquarters Dubai Studio City Dubai Internet City Dubai Knowledge Village Best of Dubai 3938 Best of Dubai
  23. 23. We seek to contribute to the economic development of the regions we are investing in, which in the long run will contribute to the success of our initiatives. What other geographic markets do you wish to enter, now that TECOM already has a presence in Malta, Tunisia, and Europe? Our telecom investment strategy is global with a special focus on the Middle East and Mediterranean regions. What are the critical components of creating a successful cluster development? Do you think that this model can be successfully implemented in every country? The single-most critical factor behind the success of a planned cluster is the environment and infrastructure it provides. TECOM clusters have been successful because they have provided an exceptional hard and soft infrastructure as well as a host of financial incentives, and business-enabling and business development services. Our objective is to help companies cut down their operational hassles so that they can concentrate on their core business. In addition, we provide them several opportunities for business development. The success of this model depends on the support and commitment of key stake-holders, mainly the government. Dubai's government has shown exceptional vision and commitment in supporting TECOM's knowledge- based clusters. What impact will the convergence of communications technologies have on the need for businesses to be located in physical proximity? How will you manage the balancing act of being a technology leader while keeping the real estate projects fully occupied? The convergence of communication technologies has revolutionised the way corporations do business and it has facilitated tremendous efficiencies. But you cannot limit the value of human interaction in conducting business. Locating in a cluster gives companies greater opportunities to establish human relationships with partners, suppliers and customers critical to the development of business. So, our aim to be a technology leader does not conflict with our need to build a community of knowledge- based companies. Demand for space in the Media and Internet Cities still exceeds supply. What provisions have you made for further expansion? Dubai Internet City and Dubai Media City are poised for massive expansion with a number of private investors developing buildings on Free Zone land. About 27 buildings are expected to be built in the next five years. This expansion will create the capacity for the growth of Dubai Media City and Dubai Internet City into a richer and even more vibrant knowledge industry hub. What kind of businesses are you seeking for prime tenancy of Studio City? From where do most of them originate? Dubai Studio City is a cluster for film, broadcast and music production companies across the world. We are particularly targeting the Hollywood and Bollywood film industries, which have being showing increasing interest in what Dubai Studio City has to offer. In the immediate term, we will be catering to the demand from Dubai Media City's broadcasting companies which are looking for the infrastructure to expand. Ultimately, Dubai Studio City aims to build a large cluster of companies from across the industry value-chain. These include production companies, support service providers offering production and post-production facilities, animation studios and services like dubbing, make-up, costume designing, stage designing and building, casting, telnet agencies as well as telecine and lab facilities. Your stated aim in supporting e-TQM is to promote quality management. What does that mean for you? Total quality management is about quality being the guiding principle of everything that we do. It is a tool which enables all members of our team to become involved in the continuous improvement of our services. It is also about a commitment to standards, systems and processes that help us achieve high customer satisfaction. What is TECOM's biggest strength? TECOM's biggest strength is its people. They are the ones responsible for our achievements and our continued success. And therefore, we believe that by developing our people we can develop our company. If there was one thing in your career you would like to change or do better, what would it be? I am striving to work closer with my team leaders to shift the mindset of employees so that we can raise their efficiency, productivity and effectiveness to meet international benchmarks rather than just local or regional. TECOM has always demonstrated its leadership in raising standards to meet international bench-marks and we will continue to do so. Tel.: +9714 391 1111 www.tecom.ae DuBiotech Headquarters Dubai Studio City Dubai Internet City Dubai Knowledge Village Best of Dubai 3938 Best of Dubai
  24. 24. Starting its days as a one-station force with just 29 members, the Dubai Police have grown considerably over the last 50 years to become a 15,000 strong organization with a reputation for safety and security that is second- to-none in the Gulf region. 40 Best of Dubai BestofDubai The Dubai Police force was established in January 1956 when the civil guards employed to protect souqs were promoted to the regular force following an order from the late Sheikh Rashid Bin Saeed Al Maktoum. His son, Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum, vice-president and prime minister of the UAE and Ruler of Dubai, was appointed as the first chief of police. Gradually a comprehensive agenda was developed for the local population to acquire the necessary skills for taking charge of their own force. This dream was realized in 1975 with the appointment of Colonel Abdullah Khalfan Abulhoul as director of the Dubai Police and Colonel Mohammad Saeed Al Gaith as his deputy. In 1980, Lieutenant-General Dhahi Khalfan Tamim took over as chief of the Dubai Police, a position he still holds to this day. Having joined the force as a 17-year- old Cadet Officer, Lieutenant-General Khalfan quickly rose up the ranks to assume complete authority while still only 28. Despite his relative youth, the new chief of police quickly set about bringing the organization into the modern world with his first project the establishment of a Crime Lab. “In those days there were no police labs,” he said in an interview to mark 50 years of the Dubai Police. “The statement would be recorded and the matter would either be settled or disputed in a haphazard manner.” From the concept of the Crime Lab, the Dubai Police force was the first Arab police force to apply DNA testing to criminal investigations, the use of Best of Dubai 41 Protect and Serve electronic finger printing and implementation of the paperless department concept. Dubai Police were also among the first in the Gulf to utilize the Automatic Vehicle Locator using Loran C signals and the first to replace this system with satellite and GPS. Under his guidance and the unflinching support of the Leadership, the Dubai Police Force is a highly efficient and modern arm of government, with a humane face. Lieutenant- General Khalfan hasn’t forgotten his community responsibilities. “Community police means a police that is acceptable amongst society, its word reaches people and gets a response from them,” he said. “I believe we cannot be a community police unless we share with the people their worries, tragedies and happiness.” Under the guidance of a leader who considers policing not just about arresting criminals, but also providing exceptional levels of public service, it is no wonder the Dubai Police have recorded a community satisfaction rating of 85 per cent, an enormous achievement considering the diverse nature of the Dubai population. It is precisely this dedication to community that Lieutenant- General Khalfan believes will maintain Dubai as one of the safest places on the globe to live and work. Despite the political geo- sensitivities of the region overall, the emirate is a haven of safety and prosperity. “If we succeed in strongly establishing the concept of community police we will be able to discover more crimes, face the dangers of terrorism and large crimes because the public is willing to cooperate with the police”, he concludes. Tel.: +9714 269 2222 www.dubaipolice.gov.ae HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum with General Dhahi Khalfan Tamim, Commander and Chief of Dubai Police at the opening of Dubai Police Headquarters in 2006 HH Sheikh Mohammed Bin Rashid Al Maktoum with General Dhahi Khalfan Tamim, Commander and Chief of Dubai Police Dubai Police.qxp 12/28/2006 11:01 AM Page 1

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